Thermal Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Buildings

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2359

Special Issue Editors

School of Thermal Engineering, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101, China
Interests: thermal comfort; building energy conservation; CFD; ground source heat pump; radiant floor heating/cooling system; urban thermal environment; building energy use; indoor air quality; ventilation; HVAC; outdoor thermal environment; air pollution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction Management, School of Engineering and the Environment, Kingston University London, Penrhyn Road, Surrey, Kingston Upon Thames KT1 2EE, UK
Interests: building and construction technology; low-carbon and sustainable building designs; building performance modelling and simulation; building thermal energy systems; low-temperature solar thermal applications; solar collector dynamic models; solar seasonal thermal storages; PCM heat storage; solar PV potential assessment; urban thermal environment; urban tree cooling effects; air-source and ground-source heat pumps; compact heat exchangers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The built environment is closely related to our daily lives with the provision of shelter, comfort of occupants, spaces for work, leisure, and living. To develop sustainable built environments in terms of energy cost efficiency and comfort of occupants, it is imperative to focus on thermal fluid flow and heat transfer in buildings, which is now a topical theme in this context. This involves an in-depth understanding of thermo-physical processes via building envelopes, heat dissipation by internal heat sources, air infiltration and ventilation in buildings, efficiency and operation strategies of building energy supply systems, occupants behavior, and so on. The fundamental principles of related thermal fluid flow and heat transfer need to be addressed, with a view to optimizing the thermal conditions and reducing energy consumption in building operation.

The Special Issue seeks to offer valuable insights into the related areas through brainstorming. It is expected to showcase effective integrated design solutions that can enhance energy efficiency and the well-being of occupants for sustainable development, as well as to address the challenges in some potential solutions. We welcome various types of articles reporting original, pioneering research that reveals pertinent aspects of Thermal Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Buildings by experimental tests, theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Topics of interests for publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Modeling and simulation of heat transfer in buildings;
  • Sustainable building designs;
  • Energy-efficient HVAC systems;
  • Building performance tests and simulations;
  • Thermal comfort in buildings;
  • Indoor air quality in buildings;
  • Integration of renewable energy systems in buildings;
  • Innovative materials and technologies for thermal enhancement;
  • Building thermal energy system and management;
  • Case studies on energy-efficient building retrofits or new construction projects.

Dr. Jiying Liu
Dr. Jie Deng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • thermal fluid
  • fluid flow
  • heat transfer
  • conduction
  • convection
  • radiation
  • built environment
  • energy efficiency
  • sustainable building
  • ventilation
  • air distribution
  • thermal comfort
  • occupant well-being
  • HVAC
  • building retrofit
  • building envelope
  • thermal management
  • CFD
  • building simulation
  • case studies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 5912 KiB  
Article
Study on the Modified Ventilation Network on the Ventilation Effect and Ozone Migration Characteristics in Grain Pile
by Kaimin Yang, Fengjiao Chu, Jiabin Li, Yuancheng Wang, Xiaoqian Dong, Jiying Liu and Yudong Mao
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 604; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030604 - 24 Feb 2024
Viewed by 585
Abstract
Grain is an important material for human survival. However, the expanding world population is contributing to a growing grain shortage. In order to reduce the loss of grain due to pests and mold during storage, mechanical ventilation as the main method of ventilation [...] Read more.
Grain is an important material for human survival. However, the expanding world population is contributing to a growing grain shortage. In order to reduce the loss of grain due to pests and mold during storage, mechanical ventilation as the main method of ventilation has crucial research significance. This article proposed and analyzed the ventilation effect and the migration characteristics of ozone in the grain pile under the modified ventilation network (MVN) and compared it with the original ventilation network (OVN). The study found that the temperature, moisture, and ozone concentration in the grain pile of the two ventilation networks are not evenly distributed in the vertical direction, showing a layered pattern. That is, with an increase in grain stack height, the temperature and moisture content of the grain stack are higher, and the ozone concentration is lower. Moreover, in the pre-ventilation period, the average temperature decline rate of the MVN was 1.25 °C/d, which was better than that of the OVN (0.84 °C/d), and the maximum temperature difference between the MVN and the OVN was 0.89 °C. The vertical ducts added to the MVN improved the ventilation effect, maintaining high ozone concentrations within the grain pile. Notably, on the sixth day of fumigation, the average ozone concentration of the MVN exceeded that of the OVN. The MVN can solve the shortcomings of the OVN, where air intake and fumigation gas rise slowly in the vertical direction. These findings hold substantial significance for optimizing ventilation network structures, devising effective fumigation strategies, and enhancing the insecticidal effects of grain storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Buildings)
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22 pages, 12346 KiB  
Article
CFD Analysis for a New Trombe Wall Concept
by Alexandru Mihai Bulmez, Alin Ionuț Brezeanu, George Dragomir, Mariana Fratu, Nicolae Fani Iordan, Sorin Ionuț Bolocan, Lucian Rozorea, Eugen Călin Popa and Gabriel Năstase
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030579 - 21 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 736
Abstract
The envelope (façade) of a building is the first barrier between the exterior and the interior of the building and withstands the highest variation in temperature and solar radiation. Trombe walls are used to take advantage of that and contribute to the heating [...] Read more.
The envelope (façade) of a building is the first barrier between the exterior and the interior of the building and withstands the highest variation in temperature and solar radiation. Trombe walls are used to take advantage of that and contribute to the heating of interior air, helping the heating system. In this study, a new Trombe wall design is presented to contribute significantly to the indoor ventilation of residential buildings. For this, an exterior wall equipped with a proposed Trombe system was studied in a numerical simulation analysis. The proposed systems consist of two important sections, an exterior one and an interior one. The air cavities on the exterior of the wall, covered with silica glass, are the first heat-transfer layer. The secondary layer used for heat transfer, on the interior, is comprised of a MPCLB wall of 115 mm. The air circulation from the exterior to the interior was established as forced convection with a ventilator. The air circulates through the first heating layer on the exterior air cavities and then passes through the second heating layer on the interior MPCLBs. Two cities in Romania were considered to represent the coldest and hottest climates in Romania. Brașov represents the cold climate and Constanța represents the hot climate. In the investigation, both the presence and absence of solar radiation were taken into account. In total, four cases were established. For all four cases, monthly research was made using monthly mean temperatures, and direct and diffuse solar radiation. The results are promising and illustrate that the system works best during the transitional seasons of spring and autumn. The lower the outdoor temperature, the higher the temperature can be increased. Overall, solar radiation accounted for an average 2 °C increase. The temperature increase varied between 3.4 °C and 15.99 °C for Brașov and between 6.42 °C and 12.07 °C in Constanța. This study presents an alternative way to use the Trombe wall for indoor ventilation purposes throughout the year, compared to traditional uses for the Trombe wall for indoor heating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Buildings)
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15 pages, 3989 KiB  
Article
Phonon Transport Characteristics of Nano-Silicon Thin Films Irradiated by Ultrafast Laser under Dispersion Relation
by Yudong Mao, Shouyu Liu, Jiying Liu, Mingzhi Yu, Xinwei Li, Moon Keun Kim and Kaimin Yang
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010210 - 13 Jan 2024
Viewed by 695
Abstract
The gray model simplifies calculations by ignoring phonon polarization, but sacrifices a certain level of computational accuracy. In effect, the frequency and wavevector of phonons form complex polarization patterns, which means their propagation modes and vibrational directions have different influences. Therefore, based on [...] Read more.
The gray model simplifies calculations by ignoring phonon polarization, but sacrifices a certain level of computational accuracy. In effect, the frequency and wavevector of phonons form complex polarization patterns, which means their propagation modes and vibrational directions have different influences. Therefore, based on the phonon dispersion relations in silicon, the lattice Boltzmann method is used to analyze the phonon transport characteristics in nano-silicon films under ultrafast laser excitation. The results show that the total energy density distribution obtained by superimposing acoustic and optical branches exhibits multiple wave-like behaviors. Among them, the acoustic branch has excellent transfer capability, dominating the rate at which the total energy density reaches a steady state distribution, while the optical branch has stronger heat capacity characteristics, with a greater impact on the peak value of the total energy density. When the heat transfer approaches a steady state, the longitudinal optical branch surprisingly contributes up to 52.73%. This indicates that the often-neglected optical phonons should also receive sufficient attention. Additionally, compared to the results of the gray model, it is found that the dispersion model is preferred when more attention is paid to the propagation characteristics during phonon transport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermal Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Buildings)
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