High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 7659

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Interests: steel-concrete composite structures; concrete constitutive models; seismic time-history analysis, slab spacial composite effect, finite element model
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Transportation Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, China
Interests: steel-concrete composite structures; steel constitutive models; seismic resilience; passive energy dissipation devices and systems; structural intelligent analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Steel–concrete composite/hybrid structures generally refer to structures that are composed of two or more types of steel and concrete components. By taking full advantage of the material properties of steel and concrete, steel–concrete composite/hybrid structures have the characteristics of excellent mechanical performance, convenient construction, low resource consumption and outstanding comprehensive benefits. Recent advances in structural material and construction technology have further promoted the development of composite/hybrid structures, which have been increasingly widely used in the fields of high-rise buildings, large-span bridges, ocean engineering, and so on. To face the challenges of large and complex civil infrastructure, the development of high-performance composite/hybrid structures has become an important trend in structural engineering.

This Special Issue, entitled “High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures”, aims to showcase the state-of-the-art investigations of steel–concrete composite/hybrid members and structures worldwide. Theoretical research, experimental work, case studies and comprehensive review papers are invited for publication. Relevant topics to this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following subjects:

  • Innovation in the novel form of steel–concrete composite/hybrid structures;
  • Resilience-enhancing strategies for composite/hybrid components and systems;
  • Composite/hybrid structures with high-performance materials;
  • Composite/hybrid structures under extreme conditions;
  • Analytical and numerical models of composite/hybrid structures;
  • Construction technology of composite/hybrid structures;
  • Intelligent analysis and design of composite/hybrid structures;
  • Life cycle performance of composite/hybrid structures;
  • Application of composite/hybrid structures in civil infrastructure.

Dr. Mu-Xuan Tao
Dr. Li-Yan Xu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • steel–concrete composite structures
  • high-resilience structural system
  • disaster resistance and mitigation
  • high-performance materials
  • performance evaluation
  • fabricated construction
  • numerical simulation
  • seismic design
  • life-cycle design
  • machine learning

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4120 KiB  
Article
Design Method for Local Buckling Resistance of Double Steel Plate–Concrete Composite Walls with Stiffening Ribs and Tie Plates
by Bin Wu, Jia-Ning Wu, Yan Lu, Wei-Yi Zhang, Dong Zhang and Song-Han Wang
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 806; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030806 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 517
Abstract
An ordinary double steel plate–concrete composite wall (ODSC wall) is composed of core concrete, the faceplates, and shear connectors such as studs, etc. Based on an ODSC wall, a new type of stiffened double steel plate–concrete composite wall (SDSC wall) is conceived by [...] Read more.
An ordinary double steel plate–concrete composite wall (ODSC wall) is composed of core concrete, the faceplates, and shear connectors such as studs, etc. Based on an ODSC wall, a new type of stiffened double steel plate–concrete composite wall (SDSC wall) is conceived by incorporating additional stiffeners and tie plates on the internal surface, which aims to improve the local stability of the faceplates. In the authors’ previous study, a series of axial compression tests were conducted on the SDSC walls. The SDSC walls in the test showed better mechanical performance, as the presence of stiffeners changed the buckling deformation mode and significantly improved the corresponding local buckling stress and ultimate strength. In this paper, a comprehensive summary of the prior research on SDSC walls is provided, and the effect of the constructive parameters on the local stability is discussed. The results reveal that the modified formula of the critical stress can degrade to the Euler formula when the stiffener-to-stud spacing ratio (i.e., a/B ratio) approaches infinity. What is more, the analysis model is also applicable for DSC walls with enclosed side plates, and the proposed formula can predict the buckling stress of the SDSC walls with different a/B ratios. In addition, according to the analysis of the numerical simulation, a design approach for SDSC walls to prevent local buckling is provided, which is applicable in practical engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures)
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23 pages, 4378 KiB  
Article
Seismic Performance Assessment of Composite Frame–High-Strength Steel Plate Wall Core Tube Resilient Structural System
by Lei Zhang, Cuikun Wang, Caihua Chen and Mingzhe Cui
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010301 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 964
Abstract
Against the backdrop of China’s continuous promotion of green and low-carbon transformation and the development of construction industrialization, high-strength composite structural systems have significant development prospects. However, their research and application in the field of construction are insufficient. In response to this issue, [...] Read more.
Against the backdrop of China’s continuous promotion of green and low-carbon transformation and the development of construction industrialization, high-strength composite structural systems have significant development prospects. However, their research and application in the field of construction are insufficient. In response to this issue, the study proposes a new high-performance structural system, namely the composite frame–high-strength steel plate wall core tube resilient structural system, which includes a core tube composed of double steel plate concrete composite shear walls and replaceable energy dissipation coupling beams, as well as composite frames. The highest strength grades of the steel plate and concrete used in the composite walls of the core tube are Q550 and C100, respectively. Using a 200 m building as an example, this study designs and establishes models for this high-performance structure and a conventional reinforced concrete frame–core tube structure. Subsequently, the dynamic elastoplastic time history analysis and seismic resilience assessment of structures are conducted under design basis earthquakes (DBEs), maximum considered earthquakes (MCEs), and extremely rare earthquakes (EREs). Research has shown that, compared to conventional structures, the thickness of shear walls of new high-performance structures can be effectively reduced, which helps decrease the self-weight of the structure and improve the available space in buildings. Additionally, high-performance structures exhibit a better performance in controlling the story drift ratio, lower plastic damage and overall stiffness degradation of the structure, and better seismic performance. The seismic resilience of the high-performance structure has been significantly enhanced, especially in terms of minimizing casualties, thereby better ensuring the safety of people’s lives and property. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures)
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28 pages, 13311 KiB  
Article
Residual Flexural Performance of Double-Layer Steel–RLHDC Composite Panels after Impact
by Zhenyu Huang, Xiaolong Zhao, Yutao Guo and Xiangqian Liu
Buildings 2023, 13(12), 2916; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13122916 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 695
Abstract
The mechanical behavior of steel–concrete–steel (SCS) sandwich composite structures under low- or high-velocity impact loading has garnered increasing attention from researchers in recent decades. However, to date, limited effort has been dedicated to studying the residual resistance of SCS sandwich composite structures following [...] Read more.
The mechanical behavior of steel–concrete–steel (SCS) sandwich composite structures under low- or high-velocity impact loading has garnered increasing attention from researchers in recent decades. However, to date, limited effort has been dedicated to studying the residual resistance of SCS sandwich composite structures following impact damage. In a previous investigation, the authors developed a rubberized lightweight high-ductility cement composite (RLHDC) for implementation in double-layer steel–RLHDC–steel composite panels and examined the dynamic response of these panels under impact. To further explore the residual performance of impact-damaged composite panels, the present study conducts flexural tests on nine such panels. The study quantifies and analyzes the effects of various connector types, connector spacing, number of concrete layers, rubber powder content, and number of impacts on the residual flexural resistance of the impact-damaged composite panels. Detailed analysis is conducted on the failure modes, load–displacement curves, strain curves, and load–slip curves of the impact-damaged specimens. The test results reveal that the impact-damaged composite panels experience flexural failure with bond slip under static load. The residual flexural performance is found to be sensitive to the number of concrete layers and number of impacts. Finite element (FE) simulations are performed using LS-DYNA to investigate the residual flexural behavior of the impact-damaged composite panels. The restart method is employed in the simulations to mimic the post-impact static loading scenario. The agreement between the FE results and the experimental findings validates the model and provides a straightforward and effective approach for studying the residual performance of composite structures. An expanded parameter analysis leveraging the calibrated FE model indicates that the steel plate’s thickness and strength predominantly influence the composite panel’s residual resistance, whereas the influence from concrete strength proves less consequential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures)
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18 pages, 3645 KiB  
Article
Economical Design Comparison of Large-Span Composite Floor Systems with I Beams and Corrugated Web Beams
by Yifan Wu, Wenhao Pan and Yaozhi Luo
Buildings 2023, 13(8), 1940; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13081940 - 30 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1701
Abstract
A comparative study of composite floor systems with I-beams and corrugated web beams is performed based on non-linear programming (NLP) algorithm. The optimization is conducted to find the most economical design with minimum steel consumption considering variables associated with the cross-sectional dimensions and [...] Read more.
A comparative study of composite floor systems with I-beams and corrugated web beams is performed based on non-linear programming (NLP) algorithm. The optimization is conducted to find the most economical design with minimum steel consumption considering variables associated with the cross-sectional dimensions and multiple constraints from standards, specifications and engineering practices. Various parameters of live loads ranging from 2 to 10 kN/m2 and spans ranging from 20 to 100 m are considered. The optimization results reveal that composite floors with corrugated web beams have reasonable and economical cross-sections with less steel consumption, owing to the high performance of the corrugated web in shear resistance and stability. Further comparative studies show that composite floors with corrugated web beams are economically competitive for spans larger than 30 m with a steel saving of 20–60%, and composite floors with welded I-beams can be applicable for spans less than 30 m considering the simpler configuration and construction. In addition, a spatially structured cable-supported steel–concrete composite floor system is proposed and recommended for super-large-span floor structures considering the cost-effectiveness of the analyzed floor systems reduces as the span further increases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures)
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20 pages, 9381 KiB  
Article
Seismic Assessment of a Single-Column Elevated Station Structure
by Yi-Fan Li, Liang-Dong Zhuang and Zhen-Hao Wu
Buildings 2023, 13(7), 1827; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13071827 - 19 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1053
Abstract
Single-column elevated station structures are irregular structures with long-span cantilever beams and individual pier columns in the transverse section. The uneven mass and stiffness in the horizontal and vertical planes necessitate research on the seismic performance of these structures. This study performed a [...] Read more.
Single-column elevated station structures are irregular structures with long-span cantilever beams and individual pier columns in the transverse section. The uneven mass and stiffness in the horizontal and vertical planes necessitate research on the seismic performance of these structures. This study performed a nonlinear response-history analysis (NRHA) of a single-column elevated station structure using the finite element program MSC.MARC and analysed its seismic performance under different seismic intensities. The stress states of the primary components were evaluated, and the effect of vertical earthquake motion on the seismic performance of the structure was considered. The torsional behavior caused by the uneven mass and stiffness in both horizontal and vertical directions should be considered, and energy dissipation measures should be taken to reduce the internal force and deformation of the bottom-pier columns and second-floor columns in the process of designation to improve the seismic performance of the structure. A bidirectional pushover analysis (BPA) was applied. The load amplification factor was adjusted to optimize the BPA results. The results of the modified BPA were similar to those of the NRHA, indicating the computational reliability of the modified BPA. The modified BPA method was accurate, applicative, and efficient. The BPA can improve computational efficiency compared to NRHA and can be widely applied in the structural design process for practical engineering applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures)
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15 pages, 3611 KiB  
Article
Experimental and Analytical Investigation on Flexural Behavior of High-Strength Steel-Concrete Composite Beams
by Hao Du, Shengnan Yuan, Tianhong Yu and Xiamin Hu
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 902; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040902 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2105
Abstract
This research investigated the flexural behavior of high-strength steel (HSS)—concrete composite beams. The effect of concrete strength on the load-deflection behavior, flexural capacity, and ductility of HSS—concrete composite beams was investigated. Four full-scale HSS—concrete composite beam specimens were tested under static load. The [...] Read more.
This research investigated the flexural behavior of high-strength steel (HSS)—concrete composite beams. The effect of concrete strength on the load-deflection behavior, flexural capacity, and ductility of HSS—concrete composite beams was investigated. Four full-scale HSS—concrete composite beam specimens were tested under static load. The test results demonstrate that the failure mode of HSS—concrete composite beams is flexural failure of the steel member and compression fracture of concrete at mid-span. The HSS—concrete composite beam exhibits good mechanical performance and deformation behavior. The ultimate bending strength and ductility of HSS—concrete composite beams were improved with the increased concrete strength. The theoretical results demonstrate that the simplified plastic method overestimates the ultimate bending strength of HSS—concrete composite beams. The main reason is that only a small part of the steel beam bottom shows plastic strengthening, which is not enough to make up for the strength loss caused by the steel near the neutral axis failure to yield and the relative interface slip. The nonlinear method based on material constitutive model could predict the load-bearing capacity accurately. After analyzing the ultimate bending capacity of 192 sample beams, the simplified plastic method was modified, and the theoretical method for ultimate bearing capacity of HSS—concrete composite beams was proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Steel–Concrete Composite/Hybrid Structures)
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