Research on Energy Efficiency and Indoor Ventilation Performance in Buildings

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 1221

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Cheongju University, 298 Daesung-ro, Cheongju 28503, Republic of Korea
Interests: building energy efficiency; ventilation performance; IAQ; NZEB

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The energy sector is responsible for a high share of human environmental impact, and this impact is caused by energy production which emits greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and intensifies climate change. Specifically, the building sector is among the main consumers of energy in communities. In addition, more than half of the total building energy consumption is due to heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, putting significant pressure on energy supply systems and leading to substantial environmental and economic impacts. Focusing on building energy consumption and ventilation systems, this Special Issue invites contributions describing new research trends, case studies, pilot-projects, reviews and state-of-the-art discussions related to building energy efficiency, ventilation performance, etc.

Submissions may concern theoretical or applied research concerning the analysis and development of building physics and performance evaluations; architectural and constructive solutions; materials characterization and preservation approaches; indoor comfort; or inhabitants' experiences in space use and energy consumption.

Dr. Daeung Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy efficiency
  • energy consumption forecasting
  • building-energy services
  • energy management
  • carbon neutrality
  • HVAC systems
  • ventilation performance
  • hybrid ventilation
  • IAQ

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3857 KiB  
Article
Energy Performance and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment towards the Nearly Zero-Energy School Buildings in Mild Climates
by Kyungmo Kang and Daeung Danny Kim
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 1147; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14041147 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 499
Abstract
The study presented an approach to accomplish the nearly zero-energy school building through the assessment of energy and economic performance of the design solutions with renewable energy systems. For energy use in the school building, the energy was mainly consumed by artificial lighting [...] Read more.
The study presented an approach to accomplish the nearly zero-energy school building through the assessment of energy and economic performance of the design solutions with renewable energy systems. For energy use in the school building, the energy was mainly consumed by artificial lighting through the analysis of two years’ energy consumption. Available passive and active solutions were adopted to improve energy efficiency in the school building and the energy performance of each design solution was analyzed. To achieve the nearly zero-energy school building, the remaining energy was offset by solar PV panels. Comparing the payback time for design solutions with the PV systems, the most appropriate design solution was selected to achieve the nearly zero-energy school building design under mild climates. In sum, the present study has revealed the challenges of achieving nearly zero-energy school building design under the climate conditions in Saudi Arabia. Moreover, the outcome of the study can lead to the development of a nearly/net-zero-energy building design under hot climates. Full article
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21 pages, 4601 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Energy-Saving Effect of Green Remodeling in Public Welfare Facilities for Net Zero: The Case of Public Daycare Centers, Public Health Centers, and Public Medical Institutions
by Sujin Woo, Kyungmo Kang and Sangyun Lee
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 949; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14040949 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 491
Abstract
In 2021, the South Korean government highlighted the Green Remodeling Project for Public Buildings as a crucial initiative for reducing building emissions and tackling post-COVID challenges. Aimed at enhancing energy efficiency and living conditions in public buildings, especially those used by children and [...] Read more.
In 2021, the South Korean government highlighted the Green Remodeling Project for Public Buildings as a crucial initiative for reducing building emissions and tackling post-COVID challenges. Aimed at enhancing energy efficiency and living conditions in public buildings, especially those used by children and the elderly, this project represents a novel approach to sustainable building practices. This research aimed to evaluate the project’s effectiveness and identify areas for improvement using a two-fold methodological approach. Initially, a survey of 1065 buildings undergoing green remodeling revealed their condition and the impact of such renovations. Additionally, simulations predicted the energy savings to be achievable, uncovering an average improvement of 30% across buildings, with variations by region and building use. Public health centers saw the highest gains. Despite these successes, disparities in outcomes highlighted the need for strategic adjustments to ensure uniform benefits. This study suggests a refined strategy to enhance green remodeling’s impact, making a significant contribution to sustainable building practices by addressing both energy saving for carbon neutrality and public health priorities in a post-pandemic context. Full article
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