New Technologies in Concrete Structures

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 3373

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Department, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421, Saudi Arabia
Interests: fiber-reinforced concrete; ferrocement; structural repair; structural design; normal, high-performance, and lightweight concretes; pozzolanic materials; durability of concrete; smart materials

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Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Department, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421, Saudi Arabia
Interests: behavior of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures; concrete materials; innovative construction materials; modern method of construction; bridge engineering; finite element analysis; repair and rehabilitation of concrete structures; forensic engineering

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Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Department, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421, Saudi Arabia
Interests: bio-cementation soil improvement; bio-grouting bio-bricks; enzyme-induced carbonate precipitation; concrete repair; treated soil/concrete under different carbonate contents and different treatments; biomineralization; characterization of each material related to calcium carbonate using techniques such as SEM, TEM, and XRD

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Upgraded design standards and increased safety requirements, in addition to the deterioration of infrastructures coupled with the damage caused by natural disasters, necessitate the need for developing new technologies that can be used in concrete structures. New technologies are also needed to meet the recent challenges posed by the increasing demand for performance, sustainability, and durability while cutting costs. The introduction of new construction materials in the industry sector is steadily rising as a result of resource constraints, advances in engineering systems, and new manufacturing technologies. Today, designing civil engineering structures requires more than just satisfying the requirements for functionality and load-carrying capacity. There is a crucial need for designing structural systems that possess a high strength to weight ratio and have a high adaptability to changes in temperature and loading conditions.

For this Special Issue, entitled “New Technologies in Concrete Structures”, authors are kindly invited to submit high-quality original research articles, reviews, and case studies on topics including, but not limited to: advances in reinforced concrete structures; smart materials; new strengthening systems,  nano building materials; off-site construction; self-healing concrete; 3D printing; geopolymer concrete; fiber-reinforced concrete; high-performance concrete; soil-cement materials; special foundation technologies; and eco-friendly cement-based materials.

This is a Special Issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This Special Issue will be edited by Mohammad Alshannag, Ali Alqarni, and Abdullah Almajed. The submission deadline for this Special Issue is 31st October 2023. This Special Issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Mohammad Jamal Mahmoud M Al-Shannag
Dr. Ali Saeed Abdulrahman Alqarni
Dr. Abdullah Abdulrahman Almajed
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • concrete structures
  • construction materials
  • fiber-reinforced composites
  • smart materials
  • structural repair
  • nanotechnology
  • durability
  • 3D printing
  • geopolymers
  • soil treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 11069 KiB  
Article
Comparative Studies on the Strength and Swell Characteristics of Cohesive Soils Using Lime and Modified Enzyme-Induced Calcite Precipitation Technique
by Abdullah Almajed, Arif Ali Baig Moghal, Mohammad Nuruddin and Syed Abu Sayeed Mohammed
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 909; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14040909 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 801
Abstract
Enzyme-induced calcite precipitation (EICP) emerges as a highly effective and well-established technique within bio-cementation approaches, offering notable advantages over traditional methods. Conversely, lime, known for its accessibility, cost-effectiveness, and efficacy, serves as a valuable material in enhancing the engineering properties of problematic soils. [...] Read more.
Enzyme-induced calcite precipitation (EICP) emerges as a highly effective and well-established technique within bio-cementation approaches, offering notable advantages over traditional methods. Conversely, lime, known for its accessibility, cost-effectiveness, and efficacy, serves as a valuable material in enhancing the engineering properties of problematic soils. This study explores the application of EICP and lime treatments separately on two distinct soils (low-plastic and high-plastic soil) exhibiting different mineralogical and plasticity characteristics to assess their impact on strength and swell characteristics. Various combinations of treatments, including jack bean (JICP), soya bean (SICP), and bio-enhancer (BICP), were employed for EICP treatment. Bio-enhancer, rich in natural urea and urease enzyme, was particularly remarkable due to its compatibility with urea supplementation. Similarly, jack bean and soya bean exhibited high efficacy in natural urease enzyme content. The study has revealed that the unconfined compression strength (UCS) of red soil increased significantly by six times at the end of 21 days of the curing period with JICP treatment, while lime treatment was more effective for the black soil. Specifically, the UCS of black cotton soil increased by 11 and 17 times when treated with Enzyme-Induced Calcite Precipitation (EICP) and lime, respectively. Moreover, EICP with J2 solution (jack bean solution with 1M urea and 4 g/L non-fat milk powder) reduced swell pressure by 60% and 67.5% in low-plastic and high-plastic soil, respectively. Lime treatment, on the other hand, led to a swell pressure reduction of 47% and 70% in low-plastic and high-plastic soil, respectively. As a result, EICP proved efficient in mitigating swell pressure for red soil, whereas lime treatment performed exceptionally well for black soil, highlighting the soil-specific effectiveness of each method. Furthermore, a life cycle assessment revealed substantial carbon footprint emission savings with EICP treatment strategy. In brief, this paper contributes to understanding the phenomena and significance of these two treatment techniques on distinct mineralogical soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies in Concrete Structures)
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27 pages, 13213 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation on the Performance of Exterior Beam–Column Joints Reinforced with Shape Memory Alloys
by Mahmoud M. Higazey, Mohammad J. Alshannag and Ali S. Alqarni
Buildings 2023, 13(7), 1801; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13071801 - 15 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2034
Abstract
Upgraded design standards coupled with the damage caused by natural disasters have led to the development of smart materials with the potential to modernize current construction practices. This investigation proposes a nonlinear finite element (FE) model for evaluating the performance of beam–column joints [...] Read more.
Upgraded design standards coupled with the damage caused by natural disasters have led to the development of smart materials with the potential to modernize current construction practices. This investigation proposes a nonlinear finite element (FE) model for evaluating the performance of beam–column joints (RC-BCJ) reinforced with shape memory alloys (SMA) and steel rebars. The model was validated based on accredited experimental data, followed by parametric analysis in ABAQUS to optimize the use of SMA bars for enhancing the seismic resistance of RC-BCJ without compromising their energy dissipation capacity. Parameters investigated include the (a) SMA–steel reinforcement ratio, (b) lengths of SMA bars, (c) elastic modulus of SMA, (d) compressive strength of concrete, and (e) axial load applied on the column. The finite element simulation results indicated that the model was capable of predicting the optimum length of SMA bars sufficient for relocating the plastic hinge away from the face of the column along the beam. Further, simulation results proved that the use of SMA bars in conjunction with steel reinforcement could be considered as an effective tool for enhancing the seismic performance of RC-BCJ joints. Among the parameters investigated, high-strength concrete was the most effective in improving joint resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies in Concrete Structures)
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