Urban Infrastructure Construction and Management

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction Management, and Computers & Digitization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 3007

Special Issue Editors

School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710061, China
Interests: asphalt pavement structure and material; micromechanical properties simulation of road materials; sustainable ecological pavement materials; high-performance road maintenance materials in special areas

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Civil Engineering, Fujian Provincial University Engineering Research Center for Advanced Civil Engineering Materials, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China
Interests: development and characterization of novel multi-functional composite materials to aid in the design of smart and sustainable infrastructures; development of new low-carbon and high-performance marine engineering materials including techniques to detect, prevent, predict, and remediate damage due to corrosion and biological fouling in the marine environment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
Interests: mechanics of pavement materials; multiscale and multiphysics modelling; resilience and sustainability of asphalt pavements; intelligent transport infrastructure and materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Management Science and Engineering, School of Management, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China
Interests: sustainable infrastructure construction and management; life cycle assessment (LCA) modelling for infrastructure system; occupational health and safety management for workers in infrastructure industry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban infrastructure construction and management, as the backbone of urban economic and social development, have significant impacts on green economic development. However, with the growing demands of urbanisation, population growth, and climate change, urban infrastructure will undoubtedly face more serious challenges. In order to solve these challenges, new construction materials and technologies are needed to enhance and improve urban infrastructure construction, such as roads, bridges, and so on. For example, urban road infrastructure is currently encountering severe obstacles, such as higher and lower temperatures, flooding, and an increased number of freezing and thawing cycles due to climate change. To avoid more frequent pavement maintenance, rehabilitation, and reconstruction, researchers and transportation agencies have recently started to focus on the resilience of pavement structures and materials. In addition, there is significant potential for improvement through the digitalisation of processes and the application of the building information modelling (BIM) approach, a methodology used to improve efficiency in urban infrastructure construction. Meanwhile, utilizing artificial intelligence and machine learning for urban infrastructure construction and management is conducive to enhancing the integration of roadside infrastructure and intelligent transportation systems. This approach shows promise in improving traffic safety and system management efficiency. The construction and management of infrastructure pose various environmental risks that jeopardize the well-being of urban inhabitants and construction workers. It is imperative to employ scientific modelling techniques to accurately assess these environmental impacts throughout the entire life cycle.

This Special Issue “Urban Infrastructure Construction and Management” will provide an overview of existing knowledge on new materials, processes, and technologies for urban infrastructure construction. Original research, theoretical and experimental work, case studies, and comprehensive review papers are invited for possible publication.

Relevant topics to this Special Issue include (but are not limited to) the following subjects:

  • New materials for urban infrastructure construction;
  • Advanced technologies for infrastructure construction;
  • Sustainable infrastructure construction management;
  • Infrastructure construction structural health monitoring;
  • Machine-learning-powered management;
  • Urban infrastructure construction under climate change;
  • Smart and sustainable infrastructural construction;
  • Building information modelling (BIM) for infrastructural construction;
  • Environmental impact modelling for infrastructure in the life cycle.

Dr. Dongyu Niu
Prof. Dr. Zhengxian Yang
Dr. Yangming Gao
Dr. Dan Chong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cement-based materials
  • asphalt materials
  • numerical modelling
  • durability and resilience
  • intelligent transport
  • BIM
  • infrastructure construction

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

14 pages, 7304 KiB  
Article
Automatic Detection of Urban Pavement Distress and Dropped Objects with a Comprehensive Dataset Collected via Smartphone
by Lin Xu, Kaimin Fu, Tao Ma, Fanlong Tang and Jianwei Fan
Buildings 2024, 14(6), 1546; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14061546 - 27 May 2024
Viewed by 167
Abstract
Pavement distress seriously affects the quality of pavement and reduces driving comfort and safety. The dropped objects from vehicles have increased the risks of traffic accidents. Therefore, automatic detection of urban pavement distress and dropped objects is an effective method to timely evaluate [...] Read more.
Pavement distress seriously affects the quality of pavement and reduces driving comfort and safety. The dropped objects from vehicles have increased the risks of traffic accidents. Therefore, automatic detection of urban pavement distress and dropped objects is an effective method to timely evaluate pavement condition. Firstly, this paper utilized a portable platform to collect pavement distress and dropped objects to establish a high-quality dataset. Six types of pavement distresses: transverse crack, longitudinal crack, alligator crack, oblique crack, potholes, and repair, and three types of dropped objects: plastic bottle, metal bottle, and tetra pak were included in this comprehensive dataset. Secondly, the real-time YOLO series detection models were used to classify and localize the pavement distresses and dropped objects. In addition, segmentation models W-segnet, U-Net, and SegNet were utilized to achieve pixel-level detection of pavement distress and dropped objects. The results show that YOLOv8 outperformed YOLOv5 and YOLOv7 with a MAP of 0.889. W-segnet showed an overall MIoU of 70.65% and 68.33% on the training set and test set, respectively, being superior to the comparison model and being able to achieve high-precision pixel-level segmentation. Finally, the trained models were performed on the holdout dataset for the generalization test. The proposed methods integrated the detection of urban pavement distress and dropped objects, which could significantly contribute to driving safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Infrastructure Construction and Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 5102 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Properties of Attapulgite-Hydroxyethyl Cellulose Composite Poly (Acrylic Acid-co-2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic Acid) Concrete Internal Curing Material
by Younan Zhao, Laifa Wang, Yongqing Li, Rui Xiong and Fuyang Lu
Buildings 2024, 14(5), 1467; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14051467 - 18 May 2024
Viewed by 314
Abstract
Attapulgite-hydroxyethyl cellulose-poly (acrylic acid-co-2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) (ATP-HEC-P(AA-co-AMPS)) in-concrete curing material was synthesized by aqueous solution polymerization using attapulgite (ATP) as an inorganic filler and hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) as a backbone. The effects of relevant factors such as ATP dosage, HEC dosage, degree of neutralization, [...] Read more.
Attapulgite-hydroxyethyl cellulose-poly (acrylic acid-co-2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) (ATP-HEC-P(AA-co-AMPS)) in-concrete curing material was synthesized by aqueous solution polymerization using attapulgite (ATP) as an inorganic filler and hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) as a backbone. The effects of relevant factors such as ATP dosage, HEC dosage, degree of neutralization, initiator quality, and cross-linking agent quality on the water absorption characteristics of ATP-HEC-P (AA-co-AMPS) were investigated through expansion tests. The micro-morphology of ATP-HEC-P (AA-co-AMPS) was also comprehensively characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, a thermal analysis, and other applicable means. The results showed that the prepared ATP-HEC-P (AA-co-AMPS) had a strong water absorption and water retention capacity, with a water absorption multiplicity of 382 g/g in deionized water and 21.55% water retention capacity after being placed at room temperature for 7 d in a bare environment. Additionally, ATP-HEC-P (AA-co-AMPS) showed good performance for absorbing liquids within the pH range of 7–12. The material’s thermal stability and mechanical properties were also significantly improved after the addition of ATP. The preparation cost is low, the process is simple, and the material meets the requirements for concrete curing materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Infrastructure Construction and Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 10449 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Workability and Mechanical Properties in Cement Mortar after Compounding Igneous Rock Powder and Silica Fume
by Bo Liu, Xiaodong Zhao, Xing Liu, Zhenqing He, Xuanhao Cao and Bowen Guan
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020359 - 28 Jan 2024
Viewed by 667
Abstract
In order to investigate the influence of igneous rock powder and silica fume on the performance of cement mortar, facilitate the application of igneous rock powder in engineering, and promote the greening of the cement industry, this study examined the pozzolanic activity of [...] Read more.
In order to investigate the influence of igneous rock powder and silica fume on the performance of cement mortar, facilitate the application of igneous rock powder in engineering, and promote the greening of the cement industry, this study examined the pozzolanic activity of three different types of igneous rock powders: granite, andesite, and tuff. It explored the workability and mechanical properties of both binary systems (igneous rock–cement) and ternary systems (igneous rock–silica fume–cement). Microscopic techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis–differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and nitrogen adsorption were used to investigate the mechanisms of how different types of igneous rock and silica fume affect the cementitious systems. The results showed that the pozzolanic activity of igneous rock powders was relatively weak, and their inclusion at levels below 20% had minimal impact on the flowability of cement mortar. In fact, within the 20% inclusion range, andesite powder even increased the flowability. Co-blending igneous rock powders with silica fume promoted the early hydration of cement, resulting in reduced calcium hydroxide (CH) content in the hydration products. The most significant increase in strength of the cement mortar system was observed when 5% to 10% (by mass) of igneous rock powder and 5% to 10% of silica fume were used as replacements for cement. The highest cement mortar strength was achieved when 10% andesite and 10% silica fume were used as replacements, resulting in a compressive strength of 52.2 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Infrastructure Construction and Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

25 pages, 7346 KiB  
Review
Recycling of Aluminosilicate-Based Solid Wastes through Alkali-Activation: Preparation, Characterization, and Challenges
by Lichao Feng, Shengjie Yi, Shuyuan Zhao, Qiucheng Zhong, Feirong Ren, Chen Liu, Yu Zhang, Wenshou Wang, Ning Xie, Zhenming Li and Na Cui
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010226 - 15 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1199
Abstract
Recycling aluminosilicate-based solid wastes is imperative to realize the sustainable development of constructions. By using alkali activation technology, aluminosilicate-based solid wastes, such as furnace slag, fly ash, red mud, and most of the bio-ashes, can be turned into alternative binder materials to Portland [...] Read more.
Recycling aluminosilicate-based solid wastes is imperative to realize the sustainable development of constructions. By using alkali activation technology, aluminosilicate-based solid wastes, such as furnace slag, fly ash, red mud, and most of the bio-ashes, can be turned into alternative binder materials to Portland cement to reduce the carbon footprint of the construction and maintenance activities of concrete structures. In this paper, the chemistry involved in the formation of alkali-activated materials (AAMs) and the influential factors of their properties are briefly reviewed. The commonly used methods, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and X-ray pair distribution function technology, to characterize the microstructure of AAMs are introduced. Typical characterization results of AAMs are shown and the limitations of each method are discussed. The main challenges, such as shrinkage, creep, efflorescence, carbonation, alkali–silica reaction, and chloride ingress, to conquer for a wider application of AAMs are reviewed. It is shown that several performances of AAMs under certain circumstances seem to be less satisfactory than traditional portland cement systems. Existing strategies to improve these performances are reviewed, and recommendations for future studies are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Infrastructure Construction and Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop