Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Collection on Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience

A topical collection in Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This collection belongs to the section "Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience".

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Collection Editor
Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Interests: stroke; ageing; drug delivery; neuroprotection; neurorepair; learning and memory; behavioural neuroscience; neuropharmacology; CNS diseases; neuroinflammation; epilepsy; extracellular matrix; glial biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

We recently started a Special Issue dedicated to systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the molecular and cellular basis of neurological disorders. The scope of the issue is broad and covers all aspects of molecular and cellular neuroscience, from genetic analyses of human populations to tissue culture and animal models of neurological disorders. The covered topics include research on action potentials, glial cells, ion channels, neuroimmunology, neurotransmitters, protein trafficking, and synapses. Of particular interest are studies using animal models of disease with translational prospects, and experimental works utilizing a bedside-to-bench approach to validate disease signatures from human patients.

Dr. Andrew Clarkson
Collection Editor

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Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Published Papers (1 paper)

2022

17 pages, 1200 KiB  
Review
Immediate Early Gene c-fos in the Brain: Focus on Glial Cells
by Fernando Cruz-Mendoza, Fernando Jauregui-Huerta, Adriana Aguilar-Delgadillo, Joaquín García-Estrada and Sonia Luquin
Brain Sci. 2022, 12(6), 687; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12060687 - 24 May 2022
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 5975
Abstract
The c-fos gene was first described as a proto-oncogene responsible for the induction of bone tumors. A few decades ago, activation of the protein product c-fos was reported in the brain after seizures and other noxious stimuli. Since then, multiple studies have used [...] Read more.
The c-fos gene was first described as a proto-oncogene responsible for the induction of bone tumors. A few decades ago, activation of the protein product c-fos was reported in the brain after seizures and other noxious stimuli. Since then, multiple studies have used c-fos as a brain activity marker. Although it has been attributed to neurons, growing evidence demonstrates that c-fos expression in the brain may also include glial cells. In this review, we collect data showing that glial cells also express this proto-oncogene. We present evidence demonstrating that at least astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia express this immediate early gene (IEG). Unlike neurons, whose expression changes used to be associated with depolarization, glial cells seem to express the c-fos proto-oncogene under the influence of proliferation, differentiation, growth, inflammation, repair, damage, plasticity, and other conditions. The collected evidence provides a complementary view of c-fos as an activity marker and urges the introduction of the glial cell perspective into brain activity studies. This glial cell view may provide additional information related to the brain microenvironment that is difficult to obtain from the isolated neuron paradigm. Thus, it is highly recommended that detection techniques are improved in order to better differentiate the phenotypes expressing c-fos in the brain and to elucidate the specific roles of c-fos expression in glial cells. Full article
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