Neuropsychological Analysis of Language Disorders

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurolinguistics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (11 November 2022) | Viewed by 12048

Special Issue Editors

Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: learning disabilities; dyslexia and related disorders; models of dyslexia; eye movements in reading; language
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies – CNR (National Research Council), 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: language acquisition; language disorders; sign language; deafnesss

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Children with language disorders are a heterogeneous group, and the severity of the delay in early expressive language and/or the presence of weaknesses in linguistic and cognitive measures, as well as environmental aspects, may affect their neuropsychological profile. This Special Issue of Brain Sciences aims to present a collection of studies detailing the most recent advancements in the field of language disorders. Authors are invited to submit cutting-edge research and reviews that address a broad range of topics related to language disorders, including the following: epidemiology, screening, early identification, comorbidities, environmental aspects that may have a role as risk or protective factors, neuropsychological profiles, relationship with a linguistic profile in toddlerhood and with learning in school years, evidence-based intervention, and long-term treatment results.

In particular, we aim to present research advances in the neuropsychological analysis of language disorders that may have a significant translational effect on the field of clinical services

Prof. Dr. Pierluigi Zoccolotti
Dr. Pasquale Rinaldi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • language disorder
  • early identification
  • comorbidity
  • screening
  • epidemiology
  • neuropsychological analysis

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

19 pages, 1721 KiB  
Article
Is Specific Learning Disorder Predicted by Developmental Language Disorder? Evidence from a Follow-Up Study on Italian Children
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(4), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13040701 - 21 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1782
Abstract
Specific Learning Disorder (SLD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component, characterized by varying manifestations and considerable differences among children. Several studies have highlighted that difficulties in language acquisition and the presence of Developmental Language Disorders (DLDs) are frequently associated with [...] Read more.
Specific Learning Disorder (SLD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component, characterized by varying manifestations and considerable differences among children. Several studies have highlighted that difficulties in language acquisition and the presence of Developmental Language Disorders (DLDs) are frequently associated with SLD, suggesting a continuity between the two disorders. This study aimed to add evidence on the proximal and distal predictors of SLD, focusing on the eventual continuity for the presence of DLD at 4–5 years, on some linguistic and communicative abilities at 27–30 months, and on biological and environmental factors. Our sample consisted of 528 families, whose children (Italian monolingual) participated in a screening program at the age of 27–30 months. When children were on average 8.05 years old, parents were asked to answer an interview aimed at collecting information about the children’s language and learning development. Results showed that the prevalence of children with an SLD (7.01%) was in line with those reported in other similar studies. The diagnosis of SLD was significantly predicted by the previous diagnosis of DLD, by male sex/gender, and by the familial risk of SLD. Children with these characteristics had a 54% probability of presenting an SLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropsychological Analysis of Language Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 1798 KiB  
Article
Relationship among Connectivity of the Frontal Aslant Tract, Executive Functions, and Speech and Language Impairment in Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(1), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13010078 - 31 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2572
Abstract
Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a subtype of motor speech disorder usually co-occurring with language impairment. A supramodal processing difficulty, involving executive functions (EFs), might contribute to the cognitive endophenotypes and behavioral manifestations. The present study aimed to profile the EFs in [...] Read more.
Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a subtype of motor speech disorder usually co-occurring with language impairment. A supramodal processing difficulty, involving executive functions (EFs), might contribute to the cognitive endophenotypes and behavioral manifestations. The present study aimed to profile the EFs in CAS, investigating the relationship between EFs, speech and language severity, and the connectivity of the frontal aslant tract (FAT), a white matter tract involved in both speech and EFs. A total of 30 preschool children with CAS underwent speech, language, and EF assessments and brain MRIs. Their FAT connectivity metrics were compared to those of 30 children without other neurodevelopmental disorders (NoNDs), who also underwent brain MRIs. Alterations in some basic EF components were found. Inhibition and working memory correlated with speech and language severity. Compared to NoND children, a weak, significant reduction in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left presupplementary motor area (preSMA) FAT component was found. Only speech severity correlated and predicted FA values along with the FAT in both of its components, and visual-spatial working memory moderated the relationship between speech severity and FA in the left SMA. Our study supports the conceptualization of a composite and complex picture of CAS, not limited to the speech core deficit, but also involving high-order cognitive skills. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropsychological Analysis of Language Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 686 KiB  
Article
Gross, Fine and Visual-Motor Skills in Children with Language Disorder, Speech Sound Disorder and Their Combination
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(1), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13010059 - 28 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2503
Abstract
Increasing evidence shows that children with Communication Disorders (CDs) may show gross, fine, and visual-motor difficulties compared to children with typical development. Accordingly, the present study aims to characterize gross, fine and visual-motor skills in children with CDs, distinguishing children with CDs into [...] Read more.
Increasing evidence shows that children with Communication Disorders (CDs) may show gross, fine, and visual-motor difficulties compared to children with typical development. Accordingly, the present study aims to characterize gross, fine and visual-motor skills in children with CDs, distinguishing children with CDs into three subgroups, i.e., with Language Disorders (LD), Speech Sound Disorders (SSD), and LD + SSD. In Experiment 1, around 60% of children with CDs (4 to 7 years; 21 with LD, 36 with SSD, and 90 with LD + SSD) showed clinical/borderline scores in balance skills, regardless of the type of communication deficit. However, children with LD, SSD, and LD + SSD did not differ in gross and fine motor skills. In Experiment 2, a higher percentage of children with CDs (4 to 7 years; 34 with LD, 62 with SSD, 148 with LD + SSD) obtained clinical/borderline scores in Visual Perception skills. Moreover, children with LD + SSD performed significantly worsen in Visual Perception and Fine Motor Coordination skills compared to children with SSD only. Our results underlined that CDs are generally associated with gross motor difficulties and that visual-motor difficulties are related to the type of communication deficit. Paying earlier attention to the motor skills of children with CDs could help clinicians design effective interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropsychological Analysis of Language Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3640 KiB  
Article
Examining Individual Differences in Singing, Musical and Tone Language Ability in Adolescents and Young Adults with Dyslexia
Brain Sci. 2022, 12(6), 744; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12060744 - 06 Jun 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2013
Abstract
In recent years, evidence has been provided that individuals with dyslexia show alterations in the anatomy and function of the auditory cortex. Dyslexia is considered to be a learning disability that affects the development of music and language capacity. We set out to [...] Read more.
In recent years, evidence has been provided that individuals with dyslexia show alterations in the anatomy and function of the auditory cortex. Dyslexia is considered to be a learning disability that affects the development of music and language capacity. We set out to test adolescents and young adults with dyslexia and controls (N = 52) for their neurophysiological differences by investigating the auditory evoked P1–N1–P2 complex. In addition, we assessed their ability in Mandarin, in singing, their musical talent and their individual differences in elementary auditory skills. A discriminant analysis of magnetencephalography (MEG) revealed that individuals with dyslexia showed prolonged latencies in P1, N1, and P2 responses. A correlational analysis between MEG and behavioral variables revealed that Mandarin syllable tone recognition, singing ability and musical aptitude (AMMA) correlated with P1, N1, and P2 latencies, respectively, while Mandarin pronunciation was only associated with N1 latency. The main findings of this study indicate that the earlier P1, N1, and P2 latencies, the better is the singing, the musical aptitude, and the ability to link Mandarin syllable tones to their corresponding syllables. We suggest that this study provides additional evidence that dyslexia can be understood as an auditory and sensory processing deficit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropsychological Analysis of Language Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 1163 KiB  
Systematic Review
Reinvestigating the Neural Bases Involved in Speech Production of Stutterers: An ALE Meta-Analysis
Brain Sci. 2022, 12(8), 1030; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12081030 - 03 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1970
Abstract
Background: Stuttering is characterized by dysfluency and difficulty in speech production. Previous research has found abnormalities in the neural function of various brain areas during speech production tasks. However, the cognitive neural mechanism of stuttering has still not been fully determined. Method: Activation [...] Read more.
Background: Stuttering is characterized by dysfluency and difficulty in speech production. Previous research has found abnormalities in the neural function of various brain areas during speech production tasks. However, the cognitive neural mechanism of stuttering has still not been fully determined. Method: Activation likelihood estimation analysis was performed to provide neural imaging evidence on neural bases by reanalyzing published studies. Results: Our analysis revealed overactivation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, and deactivation in the anterior superior temporal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus among the stutterers. The overactivated regions might indicate a greater demand in feedforward planning in speech production, while the deactivated regions might indicate dysfunction in the auditory feedback system among stutterers. Conclusions: Our findings provide updated and direct evidence on the multi-level impairment (feedforward and feedback systems) of stutterers during speech production and show that the corresponding neural bases were differentiated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropsychological Analysis of Language Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop