Structure and Function of Brain Circuits and Networks

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1106

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
Interests: neural circuit; mouse behavior; psychiatric disorders; synaptic transmission and plasticity; learning and memory

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037, USA
Interests: machine learning; neural circuit coding of behavior; neural ensemble activity; neurological disorders; systems neuroscience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Welcome to this Special Issue of the journal Brain Sciences, which is dedicated to exploring the intricate world of brain circuits and networks. The brain's complexity lies in its network of interconnected cells that enable our thoughts, emotions, and actions. Understanding the structure and function of these circuits is crucial for unraveling the mysteries of the mind and advancing neuroscience.

This Special Issue brings together cutting-edge research that investigates various aspects of neural connectivity, from microscopic organization to large-scale dynamics. Contributors employ innovative techniques and computational approaches to provide new insights into the principles governing brain function. Topics covered include synaptic plasticity, neural development, information processing, and the role of circuits in cognition and behavior. By examining the interplay between structure and function, we deepen our understanding of neural circuitry and its implications for neurological and psychiatric disorders. We invite readers to explore this collection and embark on a journey through the remarkable world of brain circuits and networks.

Dr. Jianyang Du
Dr. Hui Lu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brain circuits
  • neural networks
  • synaptic plasticity
  • neural development
  • network dynamics
  • neural coding
  • information processing
  • neuron–glia interaction
  • behavioral output
  • neurological disorders

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2627 KiB  
Article
Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1a Contributes to the Prefrontal Cortex Ischemia-Enhanced Neuronal Activities in the Amygdala
by Gyeongah Park, Qian Ge, Zhen Jin and Jianyang Du
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1684; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13121684 - 07 Dec 2023
Viewed by 855
Abstract
Following a stroke, the emergence of amygdala-related disorders poses a significant challenge, with severe implications for post-stroke mental health, including conditions such as anxiety and depression. These disorders not only hinder post-stroke recovery but also elevate mortality rates. Despite their profound impact, the [...] Read more.
Following a stroke, the emergence of amygdala-related disorders poses a significant challenge, with severe implications for post-stroke mental health, including conditions such as anxiety and depression. These disorders not only hinder post-stroke recovery but also elevate mortality rates. Despite their profound impact, the precise origins of aberrant amygdala function after a stroke remain elusive. As a target of reduced brain pH in ischemia, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have been implicated in synaptic transmission after ischemia, hinting at their potential role in reshaping neural circuits following a stroke. This study delves into the intriguing relationship between post-stroke alterations and ASICs, specifically focusing on postsynaptic ASIC1a enhancement in the amygdala following prefrontal cortex (PFC) ischemia induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) injection. Our findings intriguingly illustrate that mPFC ischemia not only accentuates the PFC to the amygdala circuit but also implicates ASIC1a in fostering augmented synaptic plasticity after ischemia. In contrast, the absence of ASIC1a impairs the heightened induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the amygdala induced by ischemia. This pivotal research introduces a novel concept with the potential to inaugurate an entirely new avenue of inquiry, thereby significantly enhancing our comprehension of the intricate mechanisms underlying post-stroke neural circuit reconfiguration. Importantly, these revelations hold the promise of paving the way for groundbreaking therapeutic interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structure and Function of Brain Circuits and Networks)
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