Neuroimmunology - the Past, Present, and Future

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3497

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Territorial Office of Messina, Italian Ministry of Health, 98122 Messina, Italy
Interests: immunology; neuroimmunology; neuroscience; multiple sclerosis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neuroimmunology as a separate discipline has its roots in the fields of neurology, neuroscience and immunology. While neuroimmunologists originally focused on classical neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and infections, there is strong evidence to suggest that the immune response contributes to genetic white matter disorders, epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, peripheral nervous system and neuro-oncological conditions, as well as aging. The COVID-19 pandemic also is a timely reminder of the importance of neuroinflammation in brain health given the shared pathobiology of COVID-19, acute stroke, and many other acquired neurological disorders.

We propose future perspectives including molecular biological studies and experimental models that may have the potential to push many areas of neuroimmunology. Such an understanding of neuroimmunology will open up new avenues for therapeutic approaches to manipulate neuroinflammation.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

(1) The Neuroimmunology of Multiple Sclerosis;

(2) immune mechanisms (human nervous system and immune systems interact);

(3) clinical neuroimmunology research;

(4) neuroimmunological aspects of health and diseases;

(5) developments in the immunotherapy of neurological disorders.

I/We look forward to receiving your contributions.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Vaccines.

Dr. Maria Elsa Gambuzza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multiple sclerosis
  • central nervous system
  • inflammation
  • neuroimmunology
  • neuroinflammation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1716 KiB  
Article
Adherence and Reactogenicity to Vaccines against SARS-COV-2 in 285 Patients with Neuropathy: A Multicentric Study
by Salvatore Iacono, Vincenzo Di Stefano, Paolo Alonge, Claudia Vinciguerra, Giammarco Milella, Francesca Caputo, Piergiorgio Lasorella, Gabriele Neto, Antonia Pignolo, Angelo Torrente, Antonino Lupica, Paola Ajdinaj, Alberto Firenze, Stefano Tozza, Fiore Manganelli, Antonio Di Muzio, Giuseppe Piscosquito and Filippo Brighina
Brain Sci. 2022, 12(10), 1396; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12101396 - 16 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2185
Abstract
Background: The safety of the new vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 have already been shown, although data on patients with polyneuropathy are still lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate the adherence to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, as well as the reactogenicity to those vaccines [...] Read more.
Background: The safety of the new vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 have already been shown, although data on patients with polyneuropathy are still lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate the adherence to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, as well as the reactogenicity to those vaccines in patients affected by neuropathy. Methods: A multicentric and web-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients affected by neuropathy from part of South Italy. Results: Out of 285 responders, n = 268 were included in the final analysis and n = 258 of them (96.3%) were fully vaccinated. Adherence to vaccination was higher in patients with hereditary neuropathies compared to others, while it was lower in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy (all p < 0.05). The overall prevalence of adverse events (AEs) was 61.2% and its occurrence was not associated with neuropathy type. Being female and of younger age were factors associated with higher risk of AEs, while having an inflammatory neuropathy and steroids assumption were associated with a lower risk (all p < 0.05). Younger age, having had an AE, and COVID-19 before vaccination were factors associated with symptoms worsening after vaccination (all p < 0.05). (4) Conclusions: Patients with neuropathy showed a high level of adherence to COVID-19 vaccination. Safety of vaccines in patients with neuropathies was comparable to the general population and it was more favorable in those with inflammatory neuropathy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroimmunology - the Past, Present, and Future)
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Review

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33 pages, 920 KiB  
Review
Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration Associated with Breast Cancer: A Case Report and a Narrative Review
by Rosario Luca Norrito, Maria Grazia Puleo, Chiara Pintus, Maria Grazia Basso, Giuliana Rizzo, Tiziana Di Chiara, Domenico Di Raimondo, Gaspare Parrinello and Antonino Tuttolomondo
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(2), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14020176 - 14 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) are an uncommon complication of cancer, affecting nearby 1/10,000 subjects with a tumour. PNSs can involve all the central and peripheral nervous systems, the muscular system, and the neuromuscular junction, causing extremely variable symptomatology. The diagnosis of the paraneoplastic [...] Read more.
Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) are an uncommon complication of cancer, affecting nearby 1/10,000 subjects with a tumour. PNSs can involve all the central and peripheral nervous systems, the muscular system, and the neuromuscular junction, causing extremely variable symptomatology. The diagnosis of the paraneoplastic disease usually precedes the clinical manifestations of cancer, making an immediate recognition of the pathology crucial to obtain a better prognosis. PNSs are autoimmune diseases caused by the expression of common antigens by the tumour and the nervous system. Specific antibodies can help clinicians diagnose them, but unfortunately, they are not always detectable. Immunosuppressive therapy and the treatment of cancer are the cornerstones of therapy for PNSs. This paper reports a case of PNSs associated with breast tumours and focuses on the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. We report a case of a young female with a clinical syndrome of the occurrence of rigidity in the right lower limb with postural instability with walking supported and diplopia, with a final diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration and seronegative rigid human syndrome associated with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroimmunology - the Past, Present, and Future)
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