How Can Psychotic Disorders Be Prevented and Treated?

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychiatric Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 1373

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Otsuka Canada Pharmaceutical Inc., Saint-Laurent, QC, Canada
Interests: brain stimulation; neuroimaging; psychiatric disorder; neurophysiology; brain stimulation; psychotic disorders; mood disorders; sub-stance-use disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Schizophrenia is a serious and devastating mental health disorder that affects 1% of our population. While the prevalence rate of schizophrenia remains constant, conversion rates seem to be increasing from substance-induced psychosis. Furthermore, the complex interplay of behaviour, the environment and genetics needs greater consideration. Antipsychotic medication is the mainstay for the treatment of psychosis. Beyond second-generation antipsychotics, dopamine-modulating medications such as aripiprazole, brexpiprazole and cariprazine are efficacious and may be more tolerable. More recently, novel compounds that target trace-associated amine receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes and Gly-T1 inhibitors show promise for negative and cognitive symptoms that often persist, in spite of positive symptom management. The question remains: can psychosis be prevented? Preclinical research is now evaluating whether the brain mechanisms associated with psychosis onset can be disrupted. Moreover, studying people with attenuated psychosis syndrome may help translate these findings and possibly prevent later conversion to schizophrenia. The aim of this Special Issue is to examine how psychotic disorders may be prevented and treated across different treatment settings. New research papers, case study reports, expert opinions and reviews are invited for submission to this Special Issue.

Dr. Mera S. Barr
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychosis
  • psychotic disorders
  • stimulant-induced psychosis
  • clinical high risk
  • schizophrenia
  • antipsychotic medication
  • prevention
  • intervention
  • maintenance

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

15 pages, 1420 KiB  
Review
Reelin Signaling and Synaptic Plasticity in Schizophrenia
by Renata Markiewicz, Agnieszka Markiewicz-Gospodarek, Bartosz Borowski, Mateusz Trubalski and Bartosz Łoza
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1704; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13121704 - 11 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1194
Abstract
Recent research emphasizes the significance of studying the quality of life of schizophrenia patients, considering the complex nature of the illness. Identifying neuronal markers for early diagnosis and treatment is crucial. Reelin (RELN) stands out among these markers, with genetic studies highlighting its [...] Read more.
Recent research emphasizes the significance of studying the quality of life of schizophrenia patients, considering the complex nature of the illness. Identifying neuronal markers for early diagnosis and treatment is crucial. Reelin (RELN) stands out among these markers, with genetic studies highlighting its role in mental health. Suppression of RELN expression may contribute to cognitive deficits by limiting dendritic proliferation, affecting neurogenesis, and leading to improper neuronal circuits. Although the physiological function of reelin is not fully understood, it plays a vital role in hippocampal cell stratification and neuroglia formation. This analysis explores reelin’s importance in the nervous system, shedding light on its impact on mental disorders such as schizophrenia, paving the way for innovative therapeutic approaches, and at the same time, raises the following conclusions: increased methylation levels of the RELN gene in patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia results in a multiple decrease in the expression of reelin, and monitoring of this indicator, i.e., methylation levels, can be used to monitor the severity of symptoms in the course of schizophrenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How Can Psychotic Disorders Be Prevented and Treated?)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop