Advances in Neuroeconomics

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2021) | Viewed by 19041

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Medicina Legal, Psiquiatría y Patología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Interests: neuroscience; neuroeconomics; behavioral economics

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Guest Editor
Departamento de Economía de la Empresa, Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, Spain
Interests: banking; microfinance; fintech; neuroeconomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Neuroeconomics is a fairly new discipline, and one of its challenges is understanding financial decision-making. Although our lives are often determined by the financial decisions we make, we still do not fully understand what causes these choices. Neuroeconomics has managed to go one step further by including neuroscience in the study of this decision-making process.

 In this emerging new field, most research has focused on certain brain areas based on what neuroscience literature has discovered so far. However, many related areas require further research.

Thus, original articles or critical reviews submitted to this Special Issue should cover topics from a wide range of views and fields, such as neuroscience, neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, psychology, behavioral neuroscience, economics, and statistics.  All original research articles and reviews investigating these topics will be welcomed.

This Special Issue seeks original contributions demonstrating the significant advancements, innovations, relevance, and potential growth in the forthcoming years of this field of neuroscience.

Dr. Tomás Ortiz
Dr. Joaquín López Pascual
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Neuroeconomics 
  • Neuromarketing 
  • Neuroscience 
  • Neuroimaging 
  • Cognitive neuroscience 
  • Psychology 
  • Behavioral neuroscience

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 9234 KiB  
Article
Watershed Brain Regions for Characterizing Brand Equity-Related Mental Processes
by Shinya Watanuki
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(12), 1619; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11121619 - 08 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2422
Abstract
Brand equity is an important intangible for enterprises. As one advantage, products with brand equity can increase revenue, compared with those without such equity. However, unlike tangibles, it is difficult for enterprises to manage brand equity because it exists within consumers’ minds. Although, [...] Read more.
Brand equity is an important intangible for enterprises. As one advantage, products with brand equity can increase revenue, compared with those without such equity. However, unlike tangibles, it is difficult for enterprises to manage brand equity because it exists within consumers’ minds. Although, over the past two decades, numerous consumer neuroscience studies have revealed the brain regions related to brand equity, the identification of unique brain regions related to such equity is still controversial. Therefore, this study identifies the unique brain regions related to brand equity and assesses the mental processes derived from these regions. For this purpose, three analysis methods (i.e., the quantitative meta-analysis, chi-square tests, and machine learning) were conducted. The data were collected in accordance with the general procedures of a qualitative meta-analysis. In total, 65 studies (1412 foci) investigating branded objects with brand equity and unbranded objects without brand equity were examined, whereas the neural systems involved for these two brain regions were contrasted. According to the results, the parahippocampal gyrus and the lingual gyrus were unique brand equity-related brain regions, whereas automatic mental processes based on emotional associative memories derived from these regions were characteristic mental processes that discriminate branded from unbranded objects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Neuroeconomics)
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12 pages, 1508 KiB  
Article
Left Frontal EEG Power Responds to Stock Price Changes in a Simulated Asset Bubble Market
by Filip-Mihai Toma and Makoto Miyakoshi
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(6), 670; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060670 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2711
Abstract
Financial bubbles are a result of aggregate irrational behavior and cannot be explained by standard economic pricing theory. Research in neuroeconomics can improve our understanding of their causes. We conducted an experiment in which 28 healthy subjects traded in a simulated market bubble, [...] Read more.
Financial bubbles are a result of aggregate irrational behavior and cannot be explained by standard economic pricing theory. Research in neuroeconomics can improve our understanding of their causes. We conducted an experiment in which 28 healthy subjects traded in a simulated market bubble, while scalp EEG was recorded using a low-cost, BCI-friendly desktop device with 14 electrodes. Independent component (IC) analysis was performed to decompose brain signals and the obtained scalp topography was used to cluster the ICs. We computed single-trial time-frequency power relative to the onset of stock price display and estimated the correlation between EEG power and stock price across trials using a general linear model. We found that delta band (1–4 Hz) EEG power within the left frontal region negatively correlated with the trial-by-trial stock prices including the financial bubble. We interpreted the result as stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN) occurring as a dis-inhibition of the resting state network. We conclude that the combination between the desktop-BCI-friendly EEG, the simulated financial bubble and advanced signal processing and statistical approaches could successfully identify the neural correlate of the financial bubble. We add to the neuroeconomics literature a complementary EEG neurometric as a bubble predictor, which can further be explored in future decision-making experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Neuroeconomics)
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23 pages, 2651 KiB  
Article
Citation Classics in Consumer Neuroscience, Neuromarketing and Neuroaesthetics: Identification and Conceptual Analysis
by Pablo Sánchez-Núñez, Manuel J. Cobo, Gustavo Vaccaro, José Ignacio Peláez and Enrique Herrera-Viedma
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(5), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050548 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3806
Abstract
Neuromarketing, consumer neuroscience and neuroaesthetics are a broad research area of neuroscience with an extensive background in scientific publications. Thus, the present study aims to identify the highly cited papers (HCPs) in this research field, to deliver a summary of the academic work [...] Read more.
Neuromarketing, consumer neuroscience and neuroaesthetics are a broad research area of neuroscience with an extensive background in scientific publications. Thus, the present study aims to identify the highly cited papers (HCPs) in this research field, to deliver a summary of the academic work produced during the last decade in this area, and to show patterns, features, and trends that define the past, present, and future of this specific area of knowledge. The HCPs show a perspective of those documents that, historically, have attracted great interest from a research community and that could be considered as the basis of the research field. In this study, we retrieved 907 documents and analyzed, through H-Classics methodology, 50 HCPs identified in the Web of Science (WoS) during the period 2010–2019. The H-Classic approach offers an objective method to identify core knowledge in neuroscience disciplines such as neuromarketing, consumer neuroscience, and neuroaesthetics. To accomplish this study, we used Bibliometrix R Package and SciMAT software. This analysis provides results that give us a useful insight into the development of this field of research, revealing those scientific actors who have made the greatest contribution to its development: authors, institutions, sources, countries as well as documents and references. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Neuroeconomics)
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15 pages, 628 KiB  
Article
Neural Predictors of Changes in Party Closeness after Exposure to Corruption Messages: An fMRI Study
by Juan Sánchez-Fernández and Luis-Alberto Casado-Aranda
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(2), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11020158 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1812
Abstract
Daily worldwide newspapers are filled with campaigning unveiling political corruption. Despite this information be worrying to many citizens, political researchers have not identified any consistent trend of decline of support among party sympathizers. This study utilizes neuroimaging for the first time to examine [...] Read more.
Daily worldwide newspapers are filled with campaigning unveiling political corruption. Despite this information be worrying to many citizens, political researchers have not identified any consistent trend of decline of support among party sympathizers. This study utilizes neuroimaging for the first time to examine the neuropsychological origin of party closeness variation among backers of a liberal (Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party, PSOE) and a conservative party (Popular Party, PP) in Spain after a month receiving corruption messages among their preferred party. Brain data provide some explanation as to the origin of party closeness reduction among liberal sympathizers: areas involved with negative feelings, disappointment and self-relevance served to predict party closeness reduction 30 days in advance. Implications for liberals and conservatives’ campaigns are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Neuroeconomics)
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Review

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12 pages, 940 KiB  
Review
An ALE Meta-Analysis on Investment Decision-Making
by Elena Ortiz-Teran, Ibai Diez and Joaquin Lopez-Pascual
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(3), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030399 - 21 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3165
Abstract
It is claimed that investment decision-making should rely on rational analyses based on facts and not emotions. However, trying to make money out of market forecasts can trigger all types of emotional responses. As the question on how investors decide remains controversial, we [...] Read more.
It is claimed that investment decision-making should rely on rational analyses based on facts and not emotions. However, trying to make money out of market forecasts can trigger all types of emotional responses. As the question on how investors decide remains controversial, we carried out an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that have reported whole-brain analyses on subjects performing an investment task. We identified the ventral striatum, anterior insula, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex as being involved in this decision-making process. These regions are limbic-related structures which respond to reward, risk and emotional conflict. Our findings support the notion that investment choices are emotional decisions that take into account market information, individual preferences and beliefs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Neuroeconomics)
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13 pages, 1876 KiB  
Review
Economic Evaluation in Neurological Physiotherapy: A Systematic Review
by David García-Álvarez, Núria Sempere-Rubio and Raquel Faubel
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(2), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11020265 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3572
Abstract
This systematic review was carried out to compile and assess original studies that included economic evaluations of neurological physiotherapy interventions. A thorough search of PubMED, Cochrane and Embase was developed using keywords such as health economics, neurological physiotherapy and cost analysis, and studies [...] Read more.
This systematic review was carried out to compile and assess original studies that included economic evaluations of neurological physiotherapy interventions. A thorough search of PubMED, Cochrane and Embase was developed using keywords such as health economics, neurological physiotherapy and cost analysis, and studies published during the last six-year term were selected. A total of 3124 studies were analyzed, and 43 were eligible for inclusion. Among the studies analyzed, 48.8% were interventions for stroke patients, and 13.9% were focused on Parkinson’s disease. In terms of the countries involved, 46.5% of the studies included were developed in the UK, and 13.9% were from the USA. The economic analysis most frequently used was cost-utility, implemented in 22 of the studies. A cost-effectiveness analysis was also developed in nine of those studies. The distribution of studies including an economic evaluation in this discipline showed a clear geographic dominance in terms of the pathology. A clear upward trend was noted in the economic evaluation of interventions developed in neurological physiotherapy. However, these studies should be promoted for their use in evidence-based clinical practice and decision-making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Neuroeconomics)
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