Nutrition in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Prevention and Treatment

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 3112

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurodegenerative diseases are especially common in very old individuals, often as a result of brain aging, which might form a continuum with neurodegeneration. In addition, other factors, such as human genetic and environmental factors, can determine the progression of neurodegenerative disease. Aging is a major risk factor for neurodegeneration. The most well-known neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are predominantly observed in elderly individuals, and the risk of these diseases increases with age. Various factors, such as lifestyle and other environmental factors, influence these diseases. Among these, obesity is a strong predisposition factor for neurodegenerative diseases. For these reasons, a healthy diet composed of healthy nutrients such as probiotics, prebiotics, and polyphenols can prevent many metabolic and inflammatory diseases associated with obesity, such as neurodegenerative diseases.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Messina
Dr. Rita Polito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • neurodegenerative diseases
  • neuroinflammation
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD)
  • Parkinson's disease (PD)
  • autonomic nervous system
  • Orexin-A
  • adipose tissue
  • adipokines
  • nutrition
  • lifestyle

Published Papers (1 paper)

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19 pages, 2039 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Effect of Beta-Carotene on Cognitive Function: A Systematic Review
by Diana Marisol Abrego-Guandique, Maria Luisa Bonet, Maria Cristina Caroleo, Roberto Cannataro, Paola Tucci, Joan Ribot and Erika Cione
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(10), 1468; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13101468 - 17 Oct 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2842
Abstract
β-carotene is a powerful antioxidant and dietary precursor of vitamin A whose role in maintaining mental health and cognitive performance, either alone or in combination with other dietary compounds, has been a topic of recent research. However, its effectiveness is still unclear. This [...] Read more.
β-carotene is a powerful antioxidant and dietary precursor of vitamin A whose role in maintaining mental health and cognitive performance, either alone or in combination with other dietary compounds, has been a topic of recent research. However, its effectiveness is still unclear. This systematic review, conducted according to the PRISMA guideline and assisted by the MySLR platform, addressed this issue. A total of 16 eligible original research articles were identified. Dietary intake or β-carotene serum levels were associated with improved measures of cognitive function in 7 out of 10 epidemiological studies included. In intervention studies, β-carotene consumption alone did not promote better cognitive function in the short term, but only in a long-term intervention with a mean duration of 18 years. However, all but one intervention study suggested the beneficial effects of β-carotene supplementation at doses ranging from 6 mg to 50 mg per day in combination with a multicomplex such as vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc, or selenium for a period of 16 weeks to 20 years. Despite the current limitations, the available evidence suggests a potential association between β-carotene dietary/supplementary intake and the maintenance of cognitive function. The β-carotene most probably does not act alone but in synergy with other micronutrients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Prevention and Treatment)
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