The Advantages of Combining Therapies in Treating Psychiatric Patients

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychiatric Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (3 March 2024) | Viewed by 4491

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry 605 006, India
Interests: comorbidity and dual diagnosis in psychiatry; psychopharmacology; attachment theory; social and cultural factors in mental health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Existing treatment modalities in psychiatry, whether biological or psychosocial in nature, are not universally effective. A wide range of variations are observed in the response to these treatments, from complete symptomatic remission to non-response. Due to this, there has been a growing interest in combining different modalities of treatment, both within and across these classes, to optimize mental health outcomes and cost-effectiveness while minimizing adverse events. Recent research has shed light on genetic, biological, and psychosocial factors that may help in predicting treatment response. The purpose of the current Special Issue is to highlight both existing knowledge and cutting-edge research in this field. Both original research and well-conducted reviews on various forms of combined treatment in psychiatry, covering issues such as the efficacy, safety, and prediction of treatment outcomes, will be considered for publication. Emphasis will be placed on work that is innovative in nature and that has well-defined implications for clinical practice or future research in this field.

Dr. Ravi Philip Rajkumar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychopharmacology
  • psychotherapy
  • neuromodulation
  • combined therapy
  • polypharmacy
  • polytherapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

11 pages, 956 KiB  
Article
Impact of Adjunctive VNS on Drug Load, Depression Severity, and Number of Neuromodulatory Maintenance Treatments
by Erhan Kavakbasi, Helen Bauermeister, Lars Lemcke and Bernhard T. Baune
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(2), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14020159 - 04 Feb 2024
Viewed by 889
Abstract
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a long-term adjunctive treatment option in patients with difficult-to-treat depression (DTD). A total of n = 20 patients (mean age 52.6 years) were included in the multicenter, prospective, observational, naturalistic RESTORE-LIFE study and were treated with adjunctive VNS [...] Read more.
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a long-term adjunctive treatment option in patients with difficult-to-treat depression (DTD). A total of n = 20 patients (mean age 52.6 years) were included in the multicenter, prospective, observational, naturalistic RESTORE-LIFE study and were treated with adjunctive VNS as an add-on to treatment as usual. Exploratory and secondary outcome parameters from a single center were investigated for this present analysis. The overall mean drug load slightly decreased from 4.5 at baseline to 4.4 at 12 months (Z = −0.534, p = 0.594). The drug load was lower in previous electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) responders than in non-responders. There was a reduction in the mean number of hospitalizations per month after VNS implantation (Z = 1.975, p = 0.048) and a significant decrease in the mean Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score from 27.3 at baseline to 15.3 at 12 months (T = 4.230, degree of freedom (df) = 19, p = 0.001). A history of ECT response at baseline was associated with greater improvement in the MADRS score after 12 months of VNS (F = 8.171, p = 0.013). The number of neuromodulatory maintenance treatments decreased during the follow-up period. In summary, there was an alleviation in the burden of illness among DTD patients treated with VNS. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3093 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Psychological and Physical Violence towards Children and Adolescents before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Lodz Voivodship
by Jagoda Grzejszczak, Agata Gabryelska, Magdalena Kotlicka-Antczak and Dominik Strzelecki
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14010024 - 25 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 965
Abstract
Background: It has been shown that the course of COVID-19 infection in the under-18 population was in many cases sparsely symptomatic. In contrast, the impact of the pandemic on the psychological state is quite different. The risk of psychopathological symptoms in children and [...] Read more.
Background: It has been shown that the course of COVID-19 infection in the under-18 population was in many cases sparsely symptomatic. In contrast, the impact of the pandemic on the psychological state is quite different. The risk of psychopathological symptoms in children and adolescents increased and the course of already present psychiatric disorders has often been exacerbated. Objectives: Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of psychological and physical violence among children and adolescents and its change during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as to investigate various factors that might affect violence. Methods: In this survey study, 782 responses were included, with 480 collected during the second and 302 during the fourth wave of COVID-19. In this cross-sectional study, an anonymous questionnaire was used to collect demographic data, medical history, mental state, psychopathological symptoms, as well as the presence of psychological, physical violence, and suicidal self-harm behaviors before (retrospectively) and during the COVID-19 pandemic in the under-18 population of the Lodz Voivodship. The survey was prepared using Google Forms. Results: A decrease in the prevalence of physical violence during both waves of the pandemic has been observed (6.39% vs. 3.45%; p < 0.001), with only a similar trend present for psychological violence 16.75% vs. 14.71%; p = 0.081). No difference between physical and psychological violence was present in different pandemic waves, type of flat or house individuals lived in, availability of one’s room, number of people living in the house, number of siblings, and type of school classes (p > 0.050). Older children (>15 years old) were more likely to be victims of psychological violence before and during the pandemic (both p < 0.001). A statistically significant model was obtained for psychological violence before (p < 0.001, R2 = 0.011) and during the pandemic (p = 0.007, R2 = 0.032). Risk factors for psychological violence before the pandemic included male gender (B = 0.531, p = 0.009, OR = 1.700), older age (B = 0.869, p = 0.001, OR = 2.385), and smaller city size (B = −0.187, p = 0.004, OR = 0.829), while for psychological violence during the pandemic, the risk factors were only male gender (B = 0.482, p = 0.022, OR = 1.620) and older age (B = 0.555, p = 0.046, OR = 1.742). No statistically significant models were created for physical violence (p > 0.050). Conclusions: The observed decrease in physical violence during the COVID-19 pandemic suggests that in the studied group, home environment was not the main source of physical violence. Yet, we did not find any predicting factors for this form of violence. Violence, both physical and psychological, is a dangerous phenomenon in the under-18 population both in the pre-pandemic period and in crisis situations such as the pandemic. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

14 pages, 599 KiB  
Review
Auditory Steady-State Responses in Schizophrenia: An Updated Meta-Analysis
by Inès Zouaoui, Alexandre Dumais, Marc E. Lavoie and Stéphane Potvin
Brain Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1722; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci13121722 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 961
Abstract
This meta-analysis investigates auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) as potential biomarkers of schizophrenia, focusing on previously unexplored clinical populations, frequencies, and variables. We examined 37 studies, encompassing a diverse cohort of 1788 patients with schizophrenia, including 208 patients with first-episode psychosis, 281 at-risk individuals, [...] Read more.
This meta-analysis investigates auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) as potential biomarkers of schizophrenia, focusing on previously unexplored clinical populations, frequencies, and variables. We examined 37 studies, encompassing a diverse cohort of 1788 patients with schizophrenia, including 208 patients with first-episode psychosis, 281 at-risk individuals, and 1603 healthy controls. The results indicate moderate reductions in 40 Hz ASSRs in schizophrenia patients, with significantly greater reductions in first-episode psychosis patients and minimal changes in at-risk individuals. These results call into question the expected progression of ASSR alterations across all stages of schizophrenia. The analysis also revealed the sensitivity of ASSR alterations at 40 Hz to various factors, including stimulus type, level of analysis, and attentional focus. In conclusion, our research highlights ASSRs, particularly at 40 Hz, as potential biomarkers of schizophrenia, revealing varied implications across different stages of the disorder. This study enriches our understanding of ASSRs in schizophrenia, highlighting their potential diagnostic and therapeutic relevance, particularly in the early stages of the disease. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

18 pages, 576 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Role of Lurasidone in Managing Depressive Symptoms in People with Schizophrenia: A Review
by Andrea Fiorillo, Gaia Sampogna, Umberto Albert, Emi Bondi, Serafino De Giorgi, Andrea Fagiolini, Maurizio Pompili, Gianluca Serafini, Umberto Volpe and Antonio Vita
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(3), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14030225 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1021
Abstract
Background: Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder characterized by positive, negative, affective, and cognitive symptoms. Affective symptoms in patients with schizophrenia have traditionally been overlooked or even neglected because they are not considered as fundamental as positive and negative symptoms in the choice [...] Read more.
Background: Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder characterized by positive, negative, affective, and cognitive symptoms. Affective symptoms in patients with schizophrenia have traditionally been overlooked or even neglected because they are not considered as fundamental as positive and negative symptoms in the choice of medication. Methods: This paper aims to systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of lurasidone in the treatment of depressive symptoms of schizophrenia. Results: Lurasidone appears to be particularly effective on the depressive symptomatology of schizophrenia while also alleviating the positive and negative symptoms associated with the illness. Conclusions: The efficacy of lurasidone in treating patients with first-episode psychosis who present with predominant depressive symptoms suggests that this medication may be a valuable treatment option not only for established cases of schizophrenia but also for individuals in the early stages of the illness. The good tolerability of lurasidone is an important factor that may positively influence treatment decisions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop