3D-Printed Biosensors

Editor


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Collection Editor
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
Interests: biosensors; biofabrication; biomanufacturing; bioanalytical chemistry; 3D printing processes

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

While inkjet printing has been applied as a surface functionalization process over the past decade, recent advances in structural, functional, and biological materials printing capabilities and processes provide new opportunities in biosensor design, fabrication, integration, and application. This Special Issue is dedicated to recent progress in 3D-printed biosensors. Original research articles reporting advances in 3D-printed biosensor transduction elements such as electrodes and stimuli-responsive materials, 3D-printed biosensor-integrated microfluidic systems such as biosensor-integrated tissue and organ chips, 3D-printed hydrogel-based biosensors, and applications of 3D-printed biosensors are encouraged. Related studies beyond these topics that report advances in 3D-printed biosensors and biosensing using 3D-printed platforms are encouraged.

This topic is central to describing the emerging landscape of manufacturing processes for biosensor fabrication, specifically expanding the use of additive manufacturing processes for biosensor design, fabrication, and application.

Dr. Blake N. Johnson
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • 3D printing
  • multi-material printing
  • bioprinting
  • microextrusion
  • inkjet
  • lab-on-a-chip
  • organ-on-a-chip
  • bio-ink
  • antibody–antigen
  • detection
  • assay

Published Papers (1 paper)

2020

14 pages, 2051 KiB  
Article
Biocompatibility of Blank, Post-Processed and Coated 3D Printed Resin Structures with Electrogenic Cells
by Cacie Hart, Charles M. Didier, Frank Sommerhage and Swaminathan Rajaraman
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110152 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 5321
Abstract
The widespread adaptation of 3D printing in the microfluidic, bioelectronic, and Bio-MEMS communities has been stifled by the lack of investigation into the biocompatibility of commercially available printer resins. By introducing an in-depth post-printing treatment of these resins, their biocompatibility can be dramatically [...] Read more.
The widespread adaptation of 3D printing in the microfluidic, bioelectronic, and Bio-MEMS communities has been stifled by the lack of investigation into the biocompatibility of commercially available printer resins. By introducing an in-depth post-printing treatment of these resins, their biocompatibility can be dramatically improved up to that of a standard cell culture vessel (99.99%). Additionally, encapsulating resins that are less biocompatible with materials that are common constituents in biosensors further enhances the biocompatibility of the material. This investigation provides a clear pathway toward developing fully functional and biocompatible 3D printed biosensor devices, especially for interfacing with electrogenic cells, utilizing benchtop-based microfabrication, and post-processing techniques. Full article
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