Novel Nanobiosensors for Environmental, Food and Clinical Analyses

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016) | Viewed by 41554

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The synthesis and use of novel nanomaterials, such metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanowires, nanorods, and many others, have led to the recent development of diverse range of biosensors with much improved sensitivity, selectivity, faster response time, and a much better reliability for the detection of various organic and inorganic substances. These devices are now commonly referred to as nanobiosensors to reflect the incorporation of one or more nanomaterials. Due to their reported outstanding performances in recent years, nanobiosensors are now in the forefront of the development of biosensors for rapid and portable detection of various substances. Many of these devices have demonstrated capabilities for detecting many substances down to femtogram or even lower levels. This has, in turn, opened up huge opportunities for the application of these devices to the analyses of environmental, food, and clinical samples for various organic and inorganic substances.

The contributions in this Special Issue will focus on all aspects of recent developments and utilization of nanobiosensors for detection, analysis and monitoring of essential, toxic and other undesirable substances in environmental, food, and clinical samples. These include nanobiosensors that incorporate nanomaterials with biomolecules, such as antibodies, aptamers, enzymes, micro-organisms, nucleic acids, tissues and organelles, whole cells or other biomolecules. These devices can be based on the use any mode of transduction, including electrochemical, magnetic, micromechanical, optical, piezoelectric and thermometric detection. We invite reviews and research articles in any of these areas.


Prof. Dr. Samuel B. Adeloju
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

2387 KiB  
Article
A Theoretical Study of Love Wave Sensors Based on ZnO–Glass Layered Structures for Application to Liquid Environments
by Cinzia Caliendo and Muhammad Hamidullah
Biosensors 2016, 6(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6040059 - 2 Dec 2016
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 6801
Abstract
The propagation of surface acoustic Love modes along ZnO/glass-based structures was modeled and analysed with the goal of designing a sensor able to detect changes in the environmental parameters, such as liquid viscosity changes and minute amounts of mass supported in the viscous [...] Read more.
The propagation of surface acoustic Love modes along ZnO/glass-based structures was modeled and analysed with the goal of designing a sensor able to detect changes in the environmental parameters, such as liquid viscosity changes and minute amounts of mass supported in the viscous liquid medium. Love mode propagation was modeled by numerically solving the system of coupled electro-mechanical field equations and Navier–Stokes equations. The phase and group velocities and the attenuation of the acoustic wave propagating along the 30° tilted c-axis ZnO/glass structure contacting a viscous non-conductive liquid were calculated for different ZnO guiding layer thicknesses, added mass thicknesses, and liquid viscosity and density. The three sensor responses, i.e., the wave phase and group velocity, and attenuation changes are calculated for different environmental parameters and related to the sensor velocity and attenuation sensitivities. The resulted sensitivities to liquid viscosity and added mass were optimized by adjusting the ZnO guiding layer thickness corresponding to a sensitivity peak. The present analysis is valuable for the manufacture and application of the ZnO-glass structure Love wave sensors for the detection of liquid properties, such as viscosity, density and mass anchored to the sensor surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Nanobiosensors for Environmental, Food and Clinical Analyses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

2608 KiB  
Article
A Cytochrome P450 3A4 Biosensor Based on Generation 4.0 PAMAM Dendrimers for the Detection of Caffeine
by Michael Müller, Neha Agarwal and Jungtae Kim
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6030044 - 18 Aug 2016
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 8222
Abstract
Cytochromes P450 (CYP, P450) are a large family of heme-active-site proteins involved in many catalytic processes, including steroidogenesis. In humans, four primary enzymes are involved in the metabolism of almost all xenobiotics. Among these enzymes, CYP3A4 is responsible for the inactivation of the [...] Read more.
Cytochromes P450 (CYP, P450) are a large family of heme-active-site proteins involved in many catalytic processes, including steroidogenesis. In humans, four primary enzymes are involved in the metabolism of almost all xenobiotics. Among these enzymes, CYP3A4 is responsible for the inactivation of the majority of used drugs which makes this enzyme an interesting target for many fields of research, especially pharmaceutical research. Since the late 1970s, attempts have been made to construct and develop electrochemical sensors for the determination of substrates. This paper is concerned with the establishment of such a CYP3A4-containing biosensor. The sensor was constructed by adsorption of alternating layers of sub-nanometer gold particle-modified PAMAM (poly-amido-amine) dendrimers of generation 4.0, along with the enzyme by a layer-by-layer assembly technique. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to elucidate the sensor assembly. Additionally, the biosensor was tested by cyclic voltammetry using caffeine as a substrate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Nanobiosensors for Environmental, Food and Clinical Analyses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

1505 KiB  
Article
Rapid Detection of Food Allergens by Microfluidics ELISA-Based Optical Sensor
by Xuan Weng, Gautam Gaur and Suresh Neethirajan
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020024 - 7 Jun 2016
Cited by 86 | Viewed by 17288
Abstract
The risks associated with the presence of hidden allergens in food have increased the need for rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for tracing food allergens in commodities. Conventional enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has usually been performed in a centralized lab, requiring considerable time [...] Read more.
The risks associated with the presence of hidden allergens in food have increased the need for rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for tracing food allergens in commodities. Conventional enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has usually been performed in a centralized lab, requiring considerable time and sample/reagent consumption and expensive detection instruments. In this study, a microfluidic ELISA platform combined with a custom-designed optical sensor was developed for the quantitative analysis of the proteins wheat gluten and Ara h 1. The developed microfluidic ELISA biosensor reduced the total assay time from hours (up to 3.5 h) to 15–20 min and decreased sample/reagent consumption to 5–10 μL, compared to a few hundred microliters in commercial ELISA kits, with superior sensitivity. The quantitative capability of the presented biosensor is a distinctive advantage over the commercially available rapid methods such as lateral flow devices (LFD) and dipstick tests. The developed microfluidic biosensor demonstrates the potential for sensitive and less-expensive on-site determination for rapidly detecting food allergens in a complex sample system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Nanobiosensors for Environmental, Food and Clinical Analyses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

914 KiB  
Article
Real-Time Detection of Staphylococcus Aureus Using Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Microdisks
by Hala Ghali, Hicham Chibli, Jay L. Nadeau, Pablo Bianucci and Yves-Alain Peter
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020020 - 3 May 2016
Cited by 45 | Viewed by 7896
Abstract
Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) microresonators have recently been studied as a means to achieve real-time label-free detection of biological targets such as virus particles, specific DNA sequences, or proteins. Due to their high quality (Q) factors, WGM resonators can be highly sensitive. A [...] Read more.
Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) microresonators have recently been studied as a means to achieve real-time label-free detection of biological targets such as virus particles, specific DNA sequences, or proteins. Due to their high quality (Q) factors, WGM resonators can be highly sensitive. A biosensor also needs to be selective, requiring proper functionalization of its surface with the appropriate ligand that will attach the biomolecule of interest. In this paper, WGM microdisks are used as biosensors for detection of Staphylococcus aureus. The microdisks are functionalized with LysK, a phage protein specific for staphylococci at the genus level. A binding event on the surface shifts the resonance peak of the microdisk resonator towards longer wavelengths. This reactive shift can be used to estimate the surface density of bacteria that bind to the surface of the resonator. The limit of detection of a microdisk with a Q-factor around 104 is on the order of 5 pg/mL, corresponding to 20 cells. No binding of Escherichia coli to the resonators is seen, supporting the specificity of the functionalization scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Nanobiosensors for Environmental, Food and Clinical Analyses)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop