Probes for Living Cell Detection

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical and Photonic Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2024) | Viewed by 4652

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203, China
Interests: live-cell imaging; superresolution microscopy; chemigenetic biosensor; cell permeable and fluorogenic probes

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203, China
Interests: SERS imaging; pH imaging; ROS sensing; tumor microenvironment; Near-infrared probe

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Live-cell imaging and sensing have provided excellent opportunities to observe cellular structures and biological events at high spatial and temporal resolution. The advancement of new imaging techniques, e.g., superresolution microscopy and stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, is providing unprecedented tools for further elucidating the biological functions in living cells. A bottleneck to applying these approaches in live-cell detection is the availability of appropriate fluorescent probes for labeling and sensing. To achieve excellent performance in live-cell imaging and sensing, an ideal probe should possess (i) good cell permeability, (ii) high fluorogenicity, (iii) high brightness and photostability, (iv) high sensitivity and specificity, and (iv) suitable excitation/emission wavelengths.

Through this Special Issue, we encourage you to share your findings and ideas in the field of bioimaging and biosensing and are thus inviting contributions that report recent advances in probes for live-cell detection. The main points of focus are (1) new probes or new strategies to improve the properties (e.g., brightness, photostability, Stokes shift, cell permeability) of conventional dyes for live-cell imaging (e.g., fluorescence, Raman, bio-/chemiluminescence), (2) new probes for sensing bioanalytes (e.g., proteins, metabolites, signal molecules, pH, ROS) in living cells or animals. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we also encourage researchers to share their ideas and discoveries on how probes could be used for drug discovery in living cells.

Prof. Dr. Lu Wang
Prof. Dr. Cong Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • live-cell microscopy
  • bioimaging
  • biosensing
  • probe design
  • responsive

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 2311 KiB  
Article
Spectral Properties Echoing the Tautomerism of Milrinone and Its Application to Fe3+ Ion Sensing and Protein Staining
by Hanming Zhu, Pan Ma, You Qian, Jiaoyun Xia, Fuchun Gong, Lusen Chen and Lujie Xu
Biosensors 2022, 12(10), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12100777 - 20 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Knowledge on the spectral properties of the tautomers of milrinone (MLR) in solvents and solid-state, as well as under light conditions is of critical importance from both theoretical and practical points of view. Herein, we investigated the spectral properties of MLR in different [...] Read more.
Knowledge on the spectral properties of the tautomers of milrinone (MLR) in solvents and solid-state, as well as under light conditions is of critical importance from both theoretical and practical points of view. Herein, we investigated the spectral properties of MLR in different conditions using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The experimental results demonstrated that MLR can undergo the tautomerization reaction induced by solvent polarity, light and pH, eliciting four tautomeric structures (enol, keto, anion, and cation forms). The interesting multi-functional groups in MLR enable it to coordinate with metal ions or to recognize gust molecules by H-bonding. In the use of MLR as an excited-state intermolecular proton transfer (inter-ESPT) fluorescent probe, a highly sensitive and selective analysis of Fe3+ was developed, which offered a sensitive detection of Fe3+ with the detection limit of 3.5 nM. More importantly, MLR exhibited the ability of anchoring proteins and led to the recognition-driven turn-on inter-ESPT process, highlighting the potential for the probe to image proteins in electrophoresis gels. The spectral experimental results revealed the possible degradation mechanism, so that we can better understand the side effects of oral preparations. The use of the available drug as an inter-ESPT fluorescent probe is simple and accurate, providing a good method for Fe3+ ion sensing and protein staining. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probes for Living Cell Detection)
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Review

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15 pages, 3458 KiB  
Review
Quantitative Imaging of Genetically Encoded Fluorescence Lifetime Biosensors
by Cong Quang Vu and Satoshi Arai
Biosensors 2023, 13(10), 939; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13100939 - 19 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Genetically encoded fluorescence lifetime biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for quantitative imaging, enabling precise measurement of cellular metabolites, molecular interactions, and dynamic cellular processes. This review provides an overview of the principles, applications, and advancements in quantitative imaging with genetically encoded fluorescence [...] Read more.
Genetically encoded fluorescence lifetime biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for quantitative imaging, enabling precise measurement of cellular metabolites, molecular interactions, and dynamic cellular processes. This review provides an overview of the principles, applications, and advancements in quantitative imaging with genetically encoded fluorescence lifetime biosensors using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (go-FLIM). We highlighted the distinct advantages of fluorescence lifetime-based measurements, including independence from expression levels, excitation power, and focus drift, resulting in robust and reliable measurements compared to intensity-based approaches. Specifically, we focus on two types of go-FLIM, namely Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)–FLIM and single-fluorescent protein (FP)-based FLIM biosensors, and discuss their unique characteristics and benefits. This review serves as a valuable resource for researchers interested in leveraging fluorescence lifetime imaging to study molecular interactions and cellular metabolism with high precision and accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probes for Living Cell Detection)
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