Advance Biosensors for Point-of-Care

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021) | Viewed by 16557

Special Issue Editor

Senior Director, Molecular Diagnostic Reagents, Medix Biochemica Group, Klovinpellontie 3, FI-02180 Espoo, Finland
Interests: molecular; diagnostics; point-of-care; microarrays; Infection; biomarkers; cancer diagnostics; virology; molecular biology; biochemistry; analytical chemistry; bioanalysis; medical diagnostics; precision medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors are analytical devices that allow the detection or monitoring of specific biomarkers by converting their biological response into electrical or measurable signals. Monitoring specific biomarkers such as nucleic acids, enzymes, antibodies, proteins, macro/micromolecules and metabolites can provide information about metabolic disorders, disease state or changes to environmental conditions. Biosensors are an integral part of point-of-care (POC) test devices, a class of in vitro diagnostic tests that are conducted outside central testing laboratories—for example, tests conducted in doctor’s offices, pharmacies, field, patient homes, care homes, small clinics or at near patient testing sites. POC tests also extend to wearable and home/self-testing devices. POC requires non-specialized training and can be performed in a timely manner in order to make rapid and accurate clinical/patient management decisions.

The increasing number of more complex diseases, antibiotic-resistant pathogens as well as the recent outbreak of COVID-19 infection worldwide have further emphasized the need for accurate, timely, and robust point-of-care diagnostic tests. The use of POC tests will continue to grow rapidly due to the need for personalized treatment and decentralized testing, representing a paradigm-shift in global healthcare. Consequently, advances in Biosensors technologies will be a key enabler of Point-of-Care diagnostic tests. Advances in biosensor research and development in areas such as (but not limited to) electrochemical detection, electromagnetic, optical/visual, immnunosensors, lab-chip, nanotechnology to bioelectronics, fluorescence detection, and nucleic acid biosensors will enable more robust and cost-effective POC tests. In this Special Issue, we welcome all research and development that advance biosensors technologies and their application in point-of-care and self-testing.

Dr. Kevin Eboigbodin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • Point-of-care
  • Wearable
  • Home testing
  • Self-testing
  • Field testing
  • Biomarker
  • Electrochemical
  • Nanotechnology
  • Bioelectronics
  • Fluorescence detection
  • Nucleic acid detection
  • Biochip
  • Lab-on-chip
  • Monitoring
  • Machine learning
  • Electromagnetic
  • Immunosensor
  • Optical
  • Visual
  • Chemiluminescence
  • Immunoassay
  • Spectroscopy
  • Smart phones

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 3038 KiB  
Article
Selective Molecular Recognition of Low Density Lipoprotein Based on β-Cyclodextrin Coated Electrochemical Biosensor
Biosensors 2021, 11(7), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11070216 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2368
Abstract
The excess of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) strongly promotes the accumulation of cholesterol on the arterial wall, which can easily lead to the atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ACDs). It is a challenge on how to recognize and quantify the LDL with a simple and sensitive [...] Read more.
The excess of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) strongly promotes the accumulation of cholesterol on the arterial wall, which can easily lead to the atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ACDs). It is a challenge on how to recognize and quantify the LDL with a simple and sensitive analytical technology. Herein, β-cyclodextrins (β-CDs), acting as molecular receptors, can bind with LDL to form stable inclusion complexes via the multiple interactions, including electrostatic, van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. With the combination of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and β-CDs, we developed an electrochemical sensor providing an excellent molecular recognition and sensing performance towards LDL detection. The LDL dynamic adsorption behavior on the surface of the β-CD-Au electrode was explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), displaying that the electron-transfer resistance (Ret) values were proportional to the LDL (positively charged apolipoprotein B-100) concentrations. The β-CD-Au modified sensor exhibited a high selectivity and sensitivity (978 kΩ·µM−1) toward LDL, especially in ultra-low concentrations compared with the common interferers HDL and HSA. Due to its excellent molecular recognition performance, β-CD-Au can be used as a sensing material to monitor LDL in human blood for preventing ACDs in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Biosensors for Point-of-Care)
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11 pages, 5241 KiB  
Article
Microelectrochemical Smart Needle for Real Time Minimally Invasive Oximetry
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110157 - 29 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2508
Abstract
A variety of brain disorders such as neural injury, brain dysfunction, vascular malformation, and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with abnormal levels of oxygen. Current methods to directly monitor tissue oxygenation in the brain are expensive and invasive, suffering from a lack of accuracy. [...] Read more.
A variety of brain disorders such as neural injury, brain dysfunction, vascular malformation, and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with abnormal levels of oxygen. Current methods to directly monitor tissue oxygenation in the brain are expensive and invasive, suffering from a lack of accuracy. Electrochemical detection has been used as an invasiveness and cost-effectiveness method, minimizing pain, discomfort, and injury to the patient. In this work, we developed a minimally invasive needle-sensor with a high surface area to monitor O2 levels in the brain using acupuncture needles. The approach was to directly etch the iron from stainless steel acupuncture needles via a controlled pitting corrosion process, obtaining a high microporous surface area. In order to increase the conductivity and selectivity, we designed and applied for the first time a low-cost coating process using non-toxic chemicals to deposit high surface area carbon nanoparticle, catalytically active laccase, and biocompatible polypyrrole. The physicochemical properties of the materials were characterized as well as their efficacy and viability as probes for the electrochemical detection of PO2. Our modified needles exhibited efficient electrocatalysis and high selectivity toward O2, with excellent repeatability. We well engineered a small diagnostic tool to monitor PO2, minimally invasive, able to monitor real-time O2 in vivo complex environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Biosensors for Point-of-Care)
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28 pages, 4094 KiB  
Review
Dengue Detection: Advances in Diagnostic Tools from Conventional Technology to Point of Care
Biosensors 2021, 11(7), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11070206 - 23 Jun 2021
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 11145
Abstract
The dengue virus (DENV) is a vector-borne flavivirus that infects around 390 million individuals each year with 2.5 billion being in danger. Having access to testing is paramount in preventing future infections and receiving adequate treatment. Currently, there are numerous conventional methods for [...] Read more.
The dengue virus (DENV) is a vector-borne flavivirus that infects around 390 million individuals each year with 2.5 billion being in danger. Having access to testing is paramount in preventing future infections and receiving adequate treatment. Currently, there are numerous conventional methods for DENV testing, such as NS1 based antigen testing, IgM/IgG antibody testing, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). In addition, novel methods are emerging that can cut both cost and time. Such methods can be effective in rural and low-income areas throughout the world. In this paper, we discuss the structural evolution of the virus followed by a comprehensive review of current dengue detection strategies and methods that are being developed or commercialized. We also discuss the state of art biosensing technologies, evaluated their performance and outline strategies to address challenges posed by the disease. Further, we outline future guidelines for the improved usage of diagnostic tools during recurrence or future outbreaks of DENV. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance Biosensors for Point-of-Care)
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