Nanostructures for Tip and Surface Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopy (TERS, SERS, SEIRA, SECARS)

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical and Photonic Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2024 | Viewed by 7419

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Head of Laboratory of Applied Plasmonics, Micro- and Nanoelectronics Department, Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, 220013 Minsk, Belarus
Interests: raman spectroscopy; SERS; biomedical analysis; plasmonic and luminescent nanomaterials; wet chemical and electrochemical processing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vibrational spectroscopy methods have found many applications in science, engineering, medicine, and other spheres of human life. In the past few decades, the tools for performing molecular analysis using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy have improved so much that it has become possible to detect target single molecules and visualize them in complex biological objects. One of the decisive roles in achieving such amazing results has been played by the combination of nanomaterials that facilitate enhancing IR absorption and Raman scattering, spectrometers, confocal, and probe microscopes. This has led to the development of unique precision techniques such as tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced IR absorption (SEIRA), and surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS), which now have tangible prospects to be widely implemented for accurate and reproducible non-contact measurements. This Special Issue aims to publish new research and state-of-the-art applications in all types of nanomaterials for TERS, SERS, SEIRA, and SECARS, including but not limited to the design, simulation, and engineering of metallic, dielectric, and hybrid nanostructures to improve molecular analysis performances, such as selectivity, reproducibility, accuracy, availability, and biosafety. It is my pleasure to encourage both theoretical and empirical work in this ever-expanding and exciting field of science and technology.

Dr. Hanna Bandarenka
Dr. Hugo Aguas
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS)
  • surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)
  • surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA)
  • surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS)
  • plasmonic nanostructures
  • charge transfer
  • electric field simulation
  • DFT and MD simulation
  • sensing and biosensing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 2971 KiB  
Article
Comparative Study of SERS-Spectra of NQ21 Peptide on Silver Particles and in Gold-Coated “Nanovoids”
by Siarhei Zavatski, Sergey Dubkov, Dmitry Gromov and Hanna Bandarenka
Biosensors 2023, 13(9), 895; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13090895 - 20 Sep 2023
Viewed by 982
Abstract
The NQ21 peptide has relatively recently attracted attention in the biomedical sphere due to its prospects for facilitating the engineering of the HIV1 vaccine and ELISA test. Today, there is still a need for a reliable and fast methodology that reveals the secondary [...] Read more.
The NQ21 peptide has relatively recently attracted attention in the biomedical sphere due to its prospects for facilitating the engineering of the HIV1 vaccine and ELISA test. Today, there is still a need for a reliable and fast methodology that reveals the secondary structure of this analyte at the low concentrations conventionally used in vaccines and immunological assays. The present research determined the differences between the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of NQ21 peptide molecules adsorbed on solid SERS-active substrates depending on their geometry and composition. The ultimate goal of our research was to propose an algorithm and SERS-active material for structural analysis of peptides. Phosphate buffer solutions of the 30 µg/mL NQ21 peptide at different pH levels were used for the SERS measurements, with silver particles on mesoporous silicon and gold-coated “nanovoids” in macroporous silicon. The SERS analysis of the NQ21 peptide was carried out by collecting the SERS spectra maps. The map assessment with an originally developed algorithm resulted in defining the effect of the substrate on the secondary structure of the analyte molecules. Silver particles are recommended for peptide detection if it is not urgent to precisely reveal all the characteristic bands, because they provide greater enhancement but are accompanied by analyte destruction. If the goal is to carefully study the secondary structure and composition of the peptide, it is better to use SERS-active gold-coated “nanovoids”. Objective results can be obtained by collecting at least three 15 × 15 maps of the SERS spectra of a given peptide on substrates from different batches. Full article
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12 pages, 3065 KiB  
Communication
Exploring the Application of Multi-Resonant Bands Terahertz Metamaterials in the Field of Carbohydrate Films Sensing
by Min Zhang, Guanxuan Guo, Yihan Xu, Zhibo Yao, Shoujun Zhang, Yuyue Yan and Zhen Tian
Biosensors 2023, 13(6), 606; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13060606 - 02 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1138
Abstract
Terahertz spectroscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the properties and states of biological matter. Here, a systematic investigation of the interaction of THz wave with “bright mode” resonators and “dark mode” resonators has been conducted, and a simple general principle of obtaining [...] Read more.
Terahertz spectroscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the properties and states of biological matter. Here, a systematic investigation of the interaction of THz wave with “bright mode” resonators and “dark mode” resonators has been conducted, and a simple general principle of obtaining multiple resonant bands has been developed. By manipulating the number and positions of bright mode and dark mode resonant elements in metamaterials, we realized multi-resonant bands terahertz metamaterial structures with three electromagnetic-induced transparency in four-frequency bands. Different carbohydrates in the state of dried films were selected for detection, and the results showed that the multi-resonant bands metamaterial have high response sensitivity at the resonance frequency similar to the characteristic frequency of the biomolecule. Furthermore, by increasing the biomolecule mass in a specific frequency band, the frequency shift in glucose was found to be larger than that of maltose. The frequency shift in glucose in the fourth frequency band is larger than that of the second band, whereas maltose exhibits an opposing trend, thus enabling recognition of maltose and glucose. Our findings provide new insights into the design of functional multi-resonant bands metamaterials, as well as new strategies for developing multi-band metamaterial biosensing devices. Full article
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Review

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13 pages, 2357 KiB  
Review
Review of Thin-Layer Chromatography Tandem with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Detection of Analytes in Mixture Samples
by Meizhen Zhang, Qian Yu, Jiaqi Guo, Bo Wu and Xianming Kong
Biosensors 2022, 12(11), 937; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12110937 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4359
Abstract
In the real world, analytes usually exist in complex systems, and this makes direct detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) difficult. Thin layer chromatography tandem with SERS (TLC-SERS) has many advantages in analysis such as separation effect, instant speed, simple process, and low [...] Read more.
In the real world, analytes usually exist in complex systems, and this makes direct detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) difficult. Thin layer chromatography tandem with SERS (TLC-SERS) has many advantages in analysis such as separation effect, instant speed, simple process, and low cost. Therefore, the TLC-SERS has great potential for detecting analytes in mixtures without sample pretreatment. The review demonstrates TLC-SERS applications in diverse analytical relevant topics such as environmental pollutants, illegal additives, pesticide residues, toxic ingredients, biological molecules, and chemical substances. Important properties such as stationary phase, separation efficiency, and sensitivity are discussed. In addition, future perspectives for improving the efficiency of TLC-SERS in real sample detecting are outlined. Full article
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