Biosensors for Determination of Protein Biomarkers

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor and Bioelectronic Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 5148

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, 60-965 Poznan, Poland
Interests: biosensors; surface plasmon resonance; liquid biopsy; biomarkers; cancer markers
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Guest Editor
Bioanalysis Laboratory, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1K, 15-245 Bialystok, Poland
Interests: biosensors; surface plasmon resonance; immunosensors; liquid biopsy; biomarkers; cancer markers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Protein biomarkers are playing a significant and growing role in medical diagnosis, based on their determination in body fluids such as urea, blood, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, etc. The diagnosis of various kinds of cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as viral and bacterial infections—including the determination of the stage of the disease and the effectiveness of medical treatment—can be performed in a non-invasive way, that is, without biopsy. Such biomarkers as CA125, HE 4, CEA, and troponins I and T have established a role in medical diagnostics. There is a need to develop new methods for the determination of known protein biomarkers, and also to search for new protein biomarkers.

Biosensors are among the most promising tools used for protein marker determination. Different types of biosensors are distinguished based on the type of transduction employed: electrochemical, mass-based, and optical.

The aim of this issue is to serve as a platform bringing together researchers working on different kinds of biosensors for protein biomarker determination. Articles may include but are not limited to the following topics:

  • electrochemical biosensors:
    • amperometric;
    • potentiometric;
    • conductometric;
  • mass-based biosensors based on:
    • quartz crystal microbalance;
    • surface acoustic wave devices;
    • optical biosensors:
    • fluorescent;
    • surface plasmon resonance;
    • localized surface plasmon resonance;
    • surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy;

as well as 

  • interferometers;
    • sub-wavelength gratings (SWG) ring resonators.

Prof. Dr. Zenon Lukaszewski
Prof. Dr. Ewa Gorodkiewicz
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • protein biomarkers
  • cancer biomarkers
  • electrochemical biosensors
  • mass-based biosensors
  • optical biosensors
  • liquid biopsy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 173 KiB  
Editorial
Biosensors for the Determination of Protein Biomarkers
by Zenon Lukaszewski and Ewa Gorodkiewicz
Biosensors 2023, 13(1), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13010112 - 09 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1182
Abstract
Circulating body fluids such as blood, urea, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, etc [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Determination of Protein Biomarkers)

Research

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10 pages, 1527 KiB  
Article
Immuno-Sensing at Ultra-Low Concentration of TG2 Protein by Organic Electrochemical Transistors
by Valentina Preziosi, Mario Barra, Valeria Rachela Villella, Speranza Esposito, Pasquale D’Angelo, Simone Luigi Marasso, Matteo Cocuzza, Antonio Cassinese and Stefano Guido
Biosensors 2023, 13(4), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13040448 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1542
Abstract
Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the transglutaminase family with Ca2+-dependent protein crosslinking activity. Its subcellular localization is crucial in determining its function, and indeed, TG2 is found in the extracellular matrix, mitochondria, recycling endosomes, plasma membrane, cytosol, and nucleus [...] Read more.
Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the transglutaminase family with Ca2+-dependent protein crosslinking activity. Its subcellular localization is crucial in determining its function, and indeed, TG2 is found in the extracellular matrix, mitochondria, recycling endosomes, plasma membrane, cytosol, and nucleus because it is associated with cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It is involved in several pathologies, such as celiac disease, cardiovascular, hepatic, renal, and fibrosis diseases, carrying out opposite functions of up and down regulation in the progression of the same pathology. Therefore, this fine regulation requires a very sensitive and specific method of identification of TG2, which is to be detected in very small quantities in a deregulated condition. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of detecting TG2 down to attomolar concentration by using organic electrochemical transistors driven by gold electrodes functionalized with anti-TG2 antibodies. In particular, a direct correlation between the TG2 concentration and the transistor transconductance values, as extracted from typical transfer curves, was found. Overall, our findings highlight the potentialities of this new biosensing approach for the detection of TG2 in the context of pathological diseases, offering a rapid and cost-effective alternative to traditional methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Determination of Protein Biomarkers)
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12 pages, 1666 KiB  
Article
A Multiple-Array SPRi Biosensor as a Tool for Detection of Gynecological–Oncological Diseases
by Beata Szymanska, Zenon Lukaszewski, Kinga Hermanowicz-Szamatowicz and Ewa Gorodkiewicz
Biosensors 2023, 13(2), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13020279 - 16 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1732
Abstract
Diagnostics based on the determination of biomarkers in body fluids will be more successful when several biomarkers are determined. A multiple-array SPRi biosensor for the simultaneous determination of CA125, HE4, CEA, IL-6 and aromatase has been developed. Five individual biosensors were placed on [...] Read more.
Diagnostics based on the determination of biomarkers in body fluids will be more successful when several biomarkers are determined. A multiple-array SPRi biosensor for the simultaneous determination of CA125, HE4, CEA, IL-6 and aromatase has been developed. Five individual biosensors were placed on the same chip. Each of them consisted of a suitable antibody covalently immobilized onto a gold chip surface via a cysteamine linker by means of the NHS/EDC protocol. The biosensor for IL-6 works in the pg mL−1 range, that for CA125 in the µg mL−1 range, and the other three within the ng mL−1 range; these are ranges suitable for the determination of biomarkers in real samples. The results obtained with the multiple-array biosensor are very similar to those obtained with a single biosensor. The applicability of the multiple biosensor was demonstrated using several examples of plasma from patients suffering from ovarian cancer and endometrial cyst. The average precision was 3.4% for the determination of CA125, 3.5% for HE4, 5.0% for CEA and IL-6, and 7.6% for aromatase. The simultaneous determination of several biomarkers may be an excellent tool for the screening of the population for earlier detection of diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Determination of Protein Biomarkers)
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