Biomedical Optics 2.0

A special issue of Biophysica (ISSN 2673-4125).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 2703

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomedical optics play an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients, as well as in advanced studies of biology. Novel methods of 3D microscopy based on various kinds of illumination patterns (wide field, focused laser beam, structured, or light sheet) are adapted for investigations of 3-dimensional cell cultures, tissues or whole organs. In addition, laser-assisted micromanipulation, e.g., optical tweezers or optoporation techniques, have been revealed as helpful tools for the diagnosis or treatment of single cells. In vitro diagnostics often requires methods of (super-resolution) microscopy, hyperspectral imaging or fluorescence lifetime imaging as well as the application of opto-acoustic methods, high-content reader systems or optical biosensors. Deconvolution, automated image processing and machine learning have become valuable tools for the evaluation of large data sets. Contributions on all these and related techniques, as well as their applications in various fields of biology, are welcome in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Herbert Schneckenburger
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biophysica is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 1879 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Insertion Mechanism of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Penetratin into Cell Membranes: Implications for Targeted Drug Delivery
by Bashiyar Almarwani, Yahia Z. Hamada, Nsoki Phambu and Anderson Sunda-Meya
Biophysica 2023, 3(4), 620-635; https://doi.org/10.3390/biophysica3040042 - 11 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1103
Abstract
The cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin (PEN) has garnered attention for its potential to enter tumor cells. However, its translocation mechanism and lack of selectivity remain debated. This study investigated PEN’s insertion into healthy cells (H-) and cancer cells (C-) using micromolar concentrations and [...] Read more.
The cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin (PEN) has garnered attention for its potential to enter tumor cells. However, its translocation mechanism and lack of selectivity remain debated. This study investigated PEN’s insertion into healthy cells (H-) and cancer cells (C-) using micromolar concentrations and various techniques. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine PEN’s location in the lipid bilayer at different lipid-to-peptide ratios. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential analysis were used to measure the lipid–PEN complex’s size and charge. The results showed helical PEN particles directly inserted into C- membranes at a ratio of 110, while aggregated particles stayed on H- surfaces. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed PEN insertion in C- membranes. Zeta potential studies revealed highly negative charges for PEN–C- complexes and neutral charges for PEN–H- complexes at pH 6.8. C- integrity remained unchanged at a ratio of 110. Specific lipid-to-peptide ratios with dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) were crucial for direct insertion. These results provide valuable insights into CPP efficacy for targeted drug delivery in cancer cells, considering membrane composition and lipid-to-peptide ratios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Optics 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 4293 KiB  
Article
Fractal Dimension Analyses to Detect Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases Using Their Thin Brain Tissue Samples via Transmission Optical Microscopy
by Ishmael Apachigawo, Dhruvil Solanki, Ruth Tate, Himanshi Singh, Mohammad Moshahid Khan and Prabhakar Pradhan
Biophysica 2023, 3(4), 569-581; https://doi.org/10.3390/biophysica3040039 - 26 Oct 2023
Viewed by 933
Abstract
Biological tissues in nature are fractal due to their self-similarity and porosity properties. These properties change with the progress of some diseases, including brain tissue in leading neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thus, there is an unmet [...] Read more.
Biological tissues in nature are fractal due to their self-similarity and porosity properties. These properties change with the progress of some diseases, including brain tissue in leading neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thus, there is an unmet clinical need to develop a tool for accurate and early diagnosis of AD and PD conditions. Although the whole brain tissues in AD and PD have been extensively studied, their local structural alterations at the nano-to-submicron levels have not been explored. In this paper, we measure the local structural alterations in different brain regions of AD and PD patients by measuring their change in fractal dimensions via optical microscopy. Our results show an increase in the fractal dimension value of ~5–10% in the affected regions of the brain tissues relative to their respective controls. For AD cases, the structural alteration is attributed to the aberrant deposition of amyloid beta protein and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, and for PD, the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons and abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein in the brain. The work will enhance the further understanding of alterations in the brain structures in AD and PD and its detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Optics 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 3618 KiB  
Review
Axial Tomography in Live Cell Microscopy
by Herbert Schneckenburger and Christoph Cremer
Biophysica 2024, 4(2), 142-157; https://doi.org/10.3390/biophysica4020010 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 311
Abstract
For many biomedical applications, laser-assisted methods are essential to enhance the three-dimensional (3D) resolution of a light microscope. In this report, we review possibilities to improve the 3D imaging potential by axial tomography. This method allows us to rotate the object in a [...] Read more.
For many biomedical applications, laser-assisted methods are essential to enhance the three-dimensional (3D) resolution of a light microscope. In this report, we review possibilities to improve the 3D imaging potential by axial tomography. This method allows us to rotate the object in a microscope into the best perspective required for imaging. Furthermore, images recorded under variable angles can be combined to one image with isotropic resolution. After a brief review of the technical state of the art, we show some biomedical applications, and discuss future perspectives for Deep View Microscopy and Molecular Imaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Optics 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop