Functional Application of Nanoparticles in Molecular Biology

A special issue of Biophysica (ISSN 2673-4125).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 653

Special Issue Editor

Centre for Modern Interdisciplinary Technologies, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, 87-100 Torun, Poland
Interests: metal nanoparticles; metal-oxide-based nanoparticles; antimicrobial activity; nanobiomedicine; wound dressings; immunotherapy; regenerative medicine; biosensors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoparticles are small particles that range between 1 and 100 nanometers in size. Given their nanoscale, they have unique material properties, and fabricated nanoparticles are used in a variety of applications, including medicine and pharmaceuticals, catalysis, and foods.

Biomolecules can also be engineered to have unique compositions and functions, such as proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. They can be collocated with various types of nanoparticles (e.g., metals and metal oxides) to utilize the inherent characteristics of the biomolecules to complement the unique properties of the nanoparticles, resulting in novel biomolecule–nanoparticle hybrids.

This Special Issue “Functional Application of Nanoparticles in Molecular Biology” of the Biophysica will focus on the synthesis, characterization, and functionalization of nanoparticles in molecular biology. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Synthesis and functionalization of novel biomolecule–nanoparticle hybrids;
  • Application of nanoparticles in cancer treatment;
  • Preparation of nanomedicines utilizing nanoparticles and their pharmacokinetics;
  • Mechanistic study of nanoparticle–cell interactions;
  • Cytotoxic potential of nanoparticles.

Original research papers and reviews on the application of nanoparticles in molecular biology are welcome.

Dr. Maciej Monedeiro-Milanowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biophysica is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • nanomedicine
  • biomolecules
  • nanoparticle–cell interactions
  • organic–inorganic hybrid
  • cytotoxic potential

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 947 KiB  
Communication
Direct Interaction of Zirconia Nanoparticles with Human Immune Cells
Biophysica 2024, 4(1), 83-91; https://doi.org/10.3390/biophysica4010006 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 333
Abstract
Nanomaterials play a crucial role in various aspects of modern life. Zirconia nanoparticles, extensively employed in medicine for fortifying and stabilizing implants in reconstructive medicine, exhibit unique electrical, thermal, catalytic, sensory, optical, and mechanical properties. While these nanoparticles have shown antibacterial activity, they [...] Read more.
Nanomaterials play a crucial role in various aspects of modern life. Zirconia nanoparticles, extensively employed in medicine for fortifying and stabilizing implants in reconstructive medicine, exhibit unique electrical, thermal, catalytic, sensory, optical, and mechanical properties. While these nanoparticles have shown antibacterial activity, they also exhibit cytotoxic effects on human cells. Our research focuses on understanding how the cells of the human immune system (both the innate response, namely HL-60 and U-937, and the acquired response, namely HUT-78 and COLO-720L) respond to the presence of zirconium (IV) oxide nanoparticles (ZrO2-NPs). Viability tests indicate that ZrO2-NPs exert the highest cytotoxicity on HL-60 > U-937 > HUT-78 > COLO 720L cell lines. Notably, concentrations exceeding 100 μg mL−1 of ZrO2-NPs result in significant cytotoxicity. These nanoparticles readily penetrate the cell membrane, causing mitochondrial damage, and their cytotoxicity is associated with heightened oxidative stress in cells. The use of ZrO2-NP-based materials may pose a risk to immune system cells, the first responders to foreign entities in the body. Biofunctionalizing the surface of ZrO2-NPs could serve as an effective strategy to mitigate cytotoxicity and introduce new properties for biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Application of Nanoparticles in Molecular Biology)
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