Natural Chemodiversity & Bioprospecting for Drug Discovery

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2022) | Viewed by 4855

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Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche Mario Serio Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: drug discovery; type 2 diabetes; insulin resistance; protein tyrosine phosphatase; cancer cell metabolism; chemoresistance; targeted therapy
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Biochemistry Unit, Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: oxidative stress; protein thiolation; carbonyl metabolism; enzyme inhibition; diabetic complications; drug discovery
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Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: organic chemistry; bioactive natural products; medicinal chemistry; isolation; stereostructure elucidation; (semi)synthesis of natural small molecules; bioprospecting of marine chemodiversity
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A special issue on "Natural Chemodiversity & Bioprospecting For Drug Discovery" is being prepared for the journal Biomolecules. As populations of species are distinguished based on different phenotypic characteristics, determining ecotypes within a taxon, so the chemotype is defined as a population of species distinguished based on secondary metabolite content. Biodiversity in nature, and thus, the chemical diversity associated with it, is immense and diverse; its systematic exploration (bioprospecting) has significant implications in many areas of research, including, but not limited to, chemical ecology, drug discovery, and nutrition. With this issue, we aim to explore the current perception by the scientific community of the value of bioprospecting in medicinal chemistry, food chemistry, and drug discovery. Original manuscripts and reviews, dealing with any aspect of the chemical space of natural products, from innovative and sustainable approaches to access and characterize the chemodiversity associated to both terrestrial and marine macro-and microorganisms to nature-inspired medicinal chemistry campaigns, are very welcome.

Prof. Dr. Paolo Paoli
Prof. Dr. Antonella Del Corso
Prof. Dr. Marialuisa Menna
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1024 KiB  
Article
Meroterpenoids Possibly Produced by a Bacterial Endosymbiont of the Tropical Basidiomycete Echinochaete brachypora
by Khadija Hassan, Clara Chepkirui, Natalia Andrea Llanos-López, Josphat C. Matasyoh, Cony Decock, Yasmina Marin-Felix and Marc Stadler
Biomolecules 2022, 12(6), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom12060755 - 28 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2084
Abstract
A mycelial culture of the African basidiomycete Echinochaete cf. brachypora was studied for biologically active secondary metabolites, and four compounds were isolated from its crude extract derived from shake flask fermentations, using preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pure metabolites were identified using [...] Read more.
A mycelial culture of the African basidiomycete Echinochaete cf. brachypora was studied for biologically active secondary metabolites, and four compounds were isolated from its crude extract derived from shake flask fermentations, using preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pure metabolites were identified using extensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Aside from the new metabolites 1-methoxyneomarinone (1) and (E)-3-methyl-5-(-12,13,14-trimethylcyclohex-10-en-6-yl)pent-2-enoic acid (4), the known metabolites neomarinone (2) and fumaquinone (4) were obtained. Such compounds had previously only been reported from Actinobacteria but were never isolated from the cultures of a fungus. This observation prompted us to evaluate whether the above metabolites may actually have been produced by an endosymbiontic bacterium that is associated with the basidiomycete. We have indeed been able to characterize bacterial 16S rDNA in the fungal mycelia, and the production of the metabolites stopped when the fungus was sub-cultured on a medium containing antibacterial antibiotics. Therefore, we have found strong evidence that compounds 14 are not of fungal origin. However, the endofungal bacterium was shown to belong to the genus Ralstonia, which has never been reported to produce similar metabolites to 14. Moreover, we failed to obtain the bacterial strain in pure culture to provide final proof for its identity. In any case, the current report is the first to document that polyporoid Basidiomycota are associated with endosymbionts and constitutes the first report on secondary metabolites from the genus Echinochaete. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Chemodiversity & Bioprospecting for Drug Discovery)
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14 pages, 1973 KiB  
Review
Essential Oils of Duguetia Species A. St. Hill (Annonaceae): Chemical Diversity and Pharmacological Potential
by Albert C. dos Santos, Mateus L. Nogueira, Felipe P. de Oliveira, Emmanoel V. Costa and Daniel P. Bezerra
Biomolecules 2022, 12(5), 615; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom12050615 - 21 Apr 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2261
Abstract
Duguetia A. St. Hill (Annonaceae) is recognized as one of the major genera with approximately 100 species, 67 of which are found in Brazil (29 of those are endemic). They are arboreal species with edible fruits known as “pindaíba”, “pindaíva” “pinha”, and “envira” [...] Read more.
Duguetia A. St. Hill (Annonaceae) is recognized as one of the major genera with approximately 100 species, 67 of which are found in Brazil (29 of those are endemic). They are arboreal species with edible fruits known as “pindaíba”, “pindaíva” “pinha”, and “envira” in Brazil. Many Duguetia species, in particular, have been used in traditional medicine to treat renal colic, stomachache, rheumatism, cough, toothache, muscle pain, fever, gastrointestinal pain, and breathing difficulties. In this study, we reviewed the chemical constituents and pharmacological properties of essential oils (EOs) from Duguetia species. A total of 12 species were found, along with their EO chemical constituents and bioactivities. Bicyclogermacrene, humulene epoxide II, spathulenol, germacrene D, caryophyllene oxide, viridiflorene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, and β-pinene were the main chemical constituents reported. The pharmacological effects of Duguetia species EOs included anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, anti-trypanosoma, cytotoxic and antitumor properties. This information adds to our understanding of the potential of the EOs of Duguetia species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Chemodiversity & Bioprospecting for Drug Discovery)
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