Lipids, Sphingolipids and Innate Immunity in Health and Disease

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules: Lipids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 3796

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Katz Family Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA
Interests: kidney; podocytes; lipids; lipid droplet; sphingolipids; innate immunity; diabetic kidney disease; focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Katz Family Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA
Interests: kidney; podocytes; lipids; lipid droplet; sphingolipids; innate immunity; diabetic kidney disease; focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lipids and sphingolipids are essential components of a cell plasma membrane with multiple cellular functions, highlighting their importance in cell homeostasis and survival. Currently, lipid dysmetabolism is recognized as one of the main features in many diseases. The toxicity of lipid accumulation (lipotoxicity) was proposed in kidney diseases, cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiomyopathy, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and some others, suggesting that lipid dysmetabolism could play an important role in the progression of these diseases. Growing evidence suggests that lipotoxicity-associated damage in those diseases depends not only on the quantity of lipids that accumulate but also on the type of lipid species. 

A critical link between lipotoxicity and a form of low-grade systemic and chronic inflammation has also been recently established in different disorders. Several inflammatory biomarkers, such as adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1), cytokines (IL-6, TNF), c-reactive protein, fibrinogen, serum albumin, and white blood cell counts, have been reported to be prognostic to risk-stratify patients for disease progression and all-cause mortality. In addition, increasing evidence supports the involvement of many components of the immune system in disease initiation and progression, including toll-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, intracellular Nod-like receptors, HIN-200 receptors, and the recently discovered cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-stimulator of interferon genes pathway (cGAS-STING).

The current Special Issue invites original research and review submissions focused on investigation of the crosstalk between immune system, lipids, and sphingolipids in health and disease. Mechanistic studies using murine models or human specimens unraveling the importance of bioactive lipids as a possible therapeutic approach in the treatment of several diseases are especially encouraged. We hope that this Special Issue of Biomolecules will represent an excellent opportunity to update our current knowledge in the field and to display the different positions of different schools across the world.

Dr. Alla Mitrofanova
Dr. Shamroop Kumar Mallela
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Lipids
  • Lipid droplets
  • Fatty acids
  • Sphingolipids
  • Inflammation
  • Disease
  • Innate immunity
  • Signaling cascade

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 4177 KiB  
Communication
The Role of Resolvins, Protectins and Marensins in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)
by Dominika Maciejewska-Markiewicz, Ewa Stachowska, Viktoria Hawryłkowicz, Laura Stachowska and Piotr Prowans
Biomolecules 2021, 11(7), 937; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom11070937 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2720
Abstract
Increased triacylglycerols’ (TAG) synthesis, insulin resistance, and prolonged liver lipid storage might lead to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Global prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be around 25%, with gradual elevation of this ratio along with the increased [...] Read more.
Increased triacylglycerols’ (TAG) synthesis, insulin resistance, and prolonged liver lipid storage might lead to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Global prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be around 25%, with gradual elevation of this ratio along with the increased content of adipose tissue in a body. The initial stages of NAFLD may be reversible, but the exposition to pathological factors should be limited. As dietary factors greatly influence various disease development, scientists try to find dietary components, helping to alleviate the steatosis. These components include n-3 polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA). This review focused on the role of resolvins, protectins and merensins in NAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipids, Sphingolipids and Innate Immunity in Health and Disease)
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