Interface of Aging and Biomaterials II

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological and Bio- Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 4364

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Bioengineering 205 Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
Interests: aging; senescence; geroscience; biomolecules; biomaterials; biocompatibility; nanoparticles; hydrogels
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following a very successful first run, we are pleased to announce the launch of a second edition of a Special Issue on the Interface of Aging and Biomaterials.

Over the past several decades, remarkable progress in medicine and public health has enabled the achievement of significant extensions in life, leading to an increasingly elderly population. The loss of tissue function with aging is one of the most immutable, and most costly, challenges in modern medicine. While this challenge may be daunting, researchers and clinicians have a growing set of tools provided by biomedical sciences. With the development of new pharmaceutical screening techniques, drug delivery systems, biomaterials, and engineered tissues, discovery and clinical translation can occur faster than ever before. Unfortunately, many of these developments are not targeted specifically to aging, may not account for the unique challenges and opportunities of aging research, and may not be broadly disseminated to the aging community. The intent of this Special Issue is to highlight the latest advances in biomaterials and biomolecules as applied in the context of aging. The scope of this Special Issue includes the progress in biomaterials, drug delivery and discovery, impact of environmental nanomaterials and compounds on aging, and physiological and pathological interactions of aging tissue with novel materials. We welcome and look forward to receiving submissions of both original research and current reviews regarding this important topic.

Dr. Joshua T. Morgan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aging
  • senescence
  • geroscience
  • biomolecules
  • biomaterials
  • biocompatibility
  • nanoparticles
  • hydrogels

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

14 pages, 3197 KiB  
Review
Restoring Mitochondrial Function and Muscle Satellite Cell Signaling: Remedies against Age-Related Sarcopenia
by Emanuele Marzetti, Biliana Lozanoska-Ochser, Riccardo Calvani, Francesco Landi, Hélio José Coelho-Júnior and Anna Picca
Biomolecules 2024, 14(4), 415; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14040415 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1379
Abstract
Sarcopenia has a complex pathophysiology that encompasses metabolic dysregulation and muscle ultrastructural changes. Among the drivers of intracellular and ultrastructural changes of muscle fibers in sarcopenia, mitochondria and their quality control pathways play relevant roles. Mononucleated muscle stem cells/satellite cells (MSCs) have been [...] Read more.
Sarcopenia has a complex pathophysiology that encompasses metabolic dysregulation and muscle ultrastructural changes. Among the drivers of intracellular and ultrastructural changes of muscle fibers in sarcopenia, mitochondria and their quality control pathways play relevant roles. Mononucleated muscle stem cells/satellite cells (MSCs) have been attributed a critical role in muscle repair after an injury. The involvement of mitochondria in supporting MSC-directed muscle repair is unclear. There is evidence that a reduction in mitochondrial biogenesis blunts muscle repair, thus indicating that the delivery of functional mitochondria to injured muscles can be harnessed to limit muscle fibrosis and enhance restoration of muscle function. Injection of autologous respiration-competent mitochondria from uninjured sites to damaged tissue has been shown to reduce infarct size and enhance cell survival in preclinical models of ischemia–reperfusion. Furthermore, the incorporation of donor mitochondria into MSCs enhances lung and cardiac tissue repair. This strategy has also been tested for regeneration purposes in traumatic muscle injuries. Indeed, the systemic delivery of mitochondria promotes muscle regeneration and restores muscle mass and function while reducing fibrosis during recovery after an injury. In this review, we discuss the contribution of altered MSC function to sarcopenia and illustrate the prospect of harnessing mitochondrial delivery and restoration of MSCs as a therapeutic strategy against age-related sarcopenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interface of Aging and Biomaterials II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

33 pages, 2767 KiB  
Review
Leveraging Biomaterial Platforms to Study Aging-Related Neural and Muscular Degeneration
by Veronica Hidalgo-Alvarez and Christopher M. Madl
Biomolecules 2024, 14(1), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14010069 - 4 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1642
Abstract
Aging is a complex multifactorial process that results in tissue function impairment across the whole organism. One of the common consequences of this process is the loss of muscle mass and the associated decline in muscle function, known as sarcopenia. Aging also presents [...] Read more.
Aging is a complex multifactorial process that results in tissue function impairment across the whole organism. One of the common consequences of this process is the loss of muscle mass and the associated decline in muscle function, known as sarcopenia. Aging also presents with an increased risk of developing other pathological conditions such as neurodegeneration. Muscular and neuronal degeneration cause mobility issues and cognitive impairment, hence having a major impact on the quality of life of the older population. The development of novel therapies that can ameliorate the effects of aging is currently hindered by our limited knowledge of the underlying mechanisms and the use of models that fail to recapitulate the structure and composition of the cell microenvironment. The emergence of bioengineering techniques based on the use of biomimetic materials and biofabrication methods has opened the possibility of generating 3D models of muscular and nervous tissues that better mimic the native extracellular matrix. These platforms are particularly advantageous for drug testing and mechanistic studies. In this review, we discuss the developments made in the creation of 3D models of aging-related neuronal and muscular degeneration and we provide a perspective on the future directions for the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interface of Aging and Biomaterials II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

0 pages, 357 KiB  
Review
Effects of Aging on Osteosynthesis at Bone–Implant Interfaces
by Alexa K. Pius, Masakazu Toya, Qi Gao, Max L. Lee, Yasemin Sude Ergul, Simon Kwoon-Ho Chow and Stuart Barry Goodman
Biomolecules 2024, 14(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14010052 - 30 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1092 | Correction
Abstract
Joint replacement is a common surgery and is predominantly utilized for treatment of osteoarthritis in the aging population. The longevity of many of these implants depends on bony ingrowth. Here, we provide an overview of current techniques in osteogenesis (inducing bone growth onto [...] Read more.
Joint replacement is a common surgery and is predominantly utilized for treatment of osteoarthritis in the aging population. The longevity of many of these implants depends on bony ingrowth. Here, we provide an overview of current techniques in osteogenesis (inducing bone growth onto an implant), which is affected by aging and inflammation. In this review we cover the biologic underpinnings of these processes as well as the clinical applications. Overall, aging has a significant effect at the cellular and macroscopic level that impacts osteosynthesis at bone-metal interfaces after joint arthroplasty; potential solutions include targeting prolonged inflammation, preventing microbial adhesion, and enhancing osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interface of Aging and Biomaterials II)
Back to TopTop