Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological and Bio- Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 10371

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
Interests: biomaterial; drug delivery; regeneration medicine; wound healing; neurodegenerative disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Shifa College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shifa Tameer-e-Millat University, Islamabad, Pakistan
Interests: biomaterials; formulation engineering; biotechnology; virology; infectious diseases; clinical education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following a very successful first run, we are pleased to announce the launch of a second edition of a Special Issue on novel materials for biomedical applications.

Novel materials, including nanoparticles, play a significant role in drug delivery for the treatment of diseases, vaccine delivery and tissue regeneration. Specifically, smart biomaterials and nanoparticles are widely used for targeted delivery.

This Special Issue of Biomolecules will focus on the most recent advances, including micro-/nanocarrier-based materials, the synthesis or conjugation of novel materials, and protein/peptide-based biomaterials for biomedical applications. Current advances in the development of these novel materials will be discussed, and the topics addressed will include multifunctional liposomes, microneedles, microdroplets, nanoparticles, and other micro-/nanocarriers for disease treatment and skin and vascular regeneration. In this context, we also encourage discussions on the design of novel micro-/nanocarriers, drug delivery, and the synthesis or conjugation of novel materials with currently available FDA-approved drugs in biomedical applications. In addition, manuscripts covering novel methods and protocols incorporating the technological advancements for strengthening the development of biomedical products and devices also fall under the scope of the Special Issue. Both research and review articles proposing novel innovations are welcome.

Dr. Jayakumar Rajadas
Dr. Mustafeez Mujtaba Babar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • micro-/nanocarriers
  • synthesis or conjugation of biomaterials
  • drug delivery
  • targeted therapy/immunotherapy for combinatorial treatment
  • regenerative medicine/tissue engineering

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

14 pages, 4167 KiB  
Article
Limonene Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effect on LPS-Induced Jejunal Injury in Mice by Inhibiting NF-κB/AP-1 Pathway
by Sarmed H. Kathem, Yasameen Sh. Nasrawi, Shihab H. Mutlag and Surya M. Nauli
Biomolecules 2024, 14(3), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14030334 - 12 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1122
Abstract
The human gastrointestinal system is a complex ecosystem crucial for well-being. During sepsis-induced gut injury, the integrity of the intestinal barrier can be compromised. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria, disrupts the intestinal barrier, contributing to inflammation and various dysfunctions. The current [...] Read more.
The human gastrointestinal system is a complex ecosystem crucial for well-being. During sepsis-induced gut injury, the integrity of the intestinal barrier can be compromised. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria, disrupts the intestinal barrier, contributing to inflammation and various dysfunctions. The current study explores the protective effects of limonene, a natural compound with diverse biological properties, against LPS-induced jejunal injury in mice. Oral administration of limonene at dosages of 100 and 200 mg/kg was used in the LPS mouse model. The Murine Sepsis Score (MSS) was utilized to evaluate the severity of sepsis, while serum levels of urea and creatinine served as indicators of renal function. Our results indicated that LPS injection induced renal function deterioration, evidenced by elevated serum urea and creatinine levels compared to control mice. However, pretreatment with limonene at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg mitigated this decline in renal function, evidenced from the reduced levels of serum urea and creatinine. Limonene demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects by reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2), suppressing the TLR4/NF-κB/AP-1 but not IRF3 signaling pathways, and modulating oxidative stress through Nrf2 activation. The results suggest that limonene holds promise as a potential therapeutic agent for mitigating intestinal inflammation and preserving gastrointestinal health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 25704 KiB  
Article
Effect of Sericin Content on the Structural Characteristics and Properties of New Silk Nonwoven Fabrics
by Ye Eun Kim, Yu Jeong Bae, Mi Jin Jang and In Chul Um
Biomolecules 2023, 13(8), 1186; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13081186 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1240
Abstract
Recently, natural silk nonwoven fabrics have attracted attention in biomedical and cosmetic applications because of their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and easy preparation. Herein, silk nonwoven fabrics were prepared by carding silk filaments to improve their productivity, and the effect of sericin content [...] Read more.
Recently, natural silk nonwoven fabrics have attracted attention in biomedical and cosmetic applications because of their excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and easy preparation. Herein, silk nonwoven fabrics were prepared by carding silk filaments to improve their productivity, and the effect of sericin content on the structure and properties of silk nonwoven fabrics was investigated. Owing to the binding effect of sericin in silk, a natural silk nonwoven fabric was successfully prepared through carding, wetting, and hot press treatments. Sericin content affected the structural characteristics and properties of the silk nonwoven fabrics. As the sericin content increased, the silk nonwoven fabrics became more compact with reduced porosity and thickness. Further, with increasing sericin content, the crystallinity and elongation of the silk nonwoven fabrics decreased while the moisture regain and the maximum stress increased. The thermal stability of most silk nonwoven fabrics was not affected by the sericin content. However, silk nonwoven fabrics without sericin had a lower thermal decomposition temperature than other nonwoven fabrics. Regardless of the sericin content, all silk nonwoven fabrics exhibited optimal cell viability and are promising candidates for cosmetic and biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 4942 KiB  
Article
Dual-Step Controlled Release of Berberine Hydrochloride from the Trans-Scale Hybrids of Nanofibers and Microparticles
by Jianfeng Zhou, Yelin Dai, Junhao Fu, Chao Yan, Deng-Guang Yu and Tao Yi
Biomolecules 2023, 13(6), 1011; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13061011 - 18 Jun 2023
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 1684
Abstract
In this nano era, nanomaterials and nanostructures are popular in developing novel functional materials. However, the combinations of materials at micro and macro scales can open new routes for developing novel trans-scale products with improved or even new functional performances. In this work, [...] Read more.
In this nano era, nanomaterials and nanostructures are popular in developing novel functional materials. However, the combinations of materials at micro and macro scales can open new routes for developing novel trans-scale products with improved or even new functional performances. In this work, a brand-new hybrid, containing both nanofibers and microparticles, was fabricated using a sequential electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) process. Firstly, the microparticles loaded with drug (berberine hydrochloride, BH) molecules in the cellulose acetate (CA) were fabricated using a solution electrospraying process. Later, these microparticles were suspended into a co-dissolved solution that contained BH and a hydrophilic polymer (polypyrrolidone, PVP) and were co-electrospun into the nanofiber/microparticle hybrids. The EHDA processes were recorded, and the resultant trans-scale products showed a typical hybrid topography, with microparticles distributed all over the nanofibers, which was demonstrated by SEM assessments. FTIR and XRD demonstrated that the components within the hybrids were presented in an amorphous state and had fine compatibility with each other. In vitro dissolution tests verified that the hybrids were able to provide the designed dual-step drug release profiles, a combination of the fast release step of BH from the hydrophilic PVP nanofibers through an erosion mechanism and the sustained release step of BH from the insoluble CA microparticles via a typical Fickian diffusion mechanism. The present protocols pave a new way for developing trans-scale functional materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 4826 KiB  
Article
β-Glucan and Fatty Acid Based Mucoadhesive Carrier for Gastrointestinal Tract Specific Local and Sustained Drug Delivery
by Stephanie Vargas Esquivel, Himanshu N. Bhatt, Rimpy Diwan, Ahsan Habib, Wen-Yee Lee, Zehedina Khatun and Md Nurunnabi
Biomolecules 2023, 13(5), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13050768 - 28 Apr 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2368
Abstract
The oral route is considered the most convenient route of drug administration for both systemic and local delivery. Besides stability and transportation, another unmet but important issue regarding oral medication is retention duration within the specific region of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We [...] Read more.
The oral route is considered the most convenient route of drug administration for both systemic and local delivery. Besides stability and transportation, another unmet but important issue regarding oral medication is retention duration within the specific region of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We hypothesize that an oral vehicle that can adhere and maintain retention within the stomach for a longer duration can be more effective to treat stomach-related diseases. Therefore, in this project, we developed a carrier that is highly specific to the stomach and maintains its retention for a longer duration. We developed a vehicle composed of β-Glucan And Docosahexaenoic Acid (GADA) to observe its affinity and specificity to the stomach. GADA forms a spherical-shaped particle with negative zeta potential values that vary based on the feed ratio of docosahexaenoic acid. Docosahexaenoic acid is an omega-3 fatty acid that has transporters and receptors throughout the GI tract, such as CD36, plasma membrane-associated fatty acid-binding protein (FABP (pm)), and a family of fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1-6). The in vitro studies and characterization data showed that GADA has the capability to carry a payload of hydrophobic molecules and specifically deliver the payload to the GI tract, exert its therapeutic effects, and help to maintain stability for more than 12 h in the gastric and intestinal fluid. The particle size and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data showed that GADA has a strong binding affinity with mucin in the presence of simulated gastric fluids. We observed a comparatively higher drug release of lidocaine in gastric juice than that in intestinal fluids, demonstrating the influence of the pH values of the media on drug-release kinetics. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of mice demonstrated that GADA maintains its retention within the stomach for at least 4 hr. This stomach-specific oral vehicle holds strong promise to translate various injectable therapeutic drugs to oral form upon further optimizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

15 pages, 932 KiB  
Review
The Chicken Egg: An Advanced Material for Tissue Engineering
by Yuli Zhang, Hieu M. Pham and Simon D. Tran
Biomolecules 2024, 14(4), 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14040439 - 4 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1146
Abstract
The chicken egg, an excellent natural source of proteins, has been an overlooked native biomaterial with remarkable physicochemical, structural, and biological properties. Recently, with significant advances in biomedical engineering, particularly in the development of 3D in vitro platforms, chicken egg materials have increasingly [...] Read more.
The chicken egg, an excellent natural source of proteins, has been an overlooked native biomaterial with remarkable physicochemical, structural, and biological properties. Recently, with significant advances in biomedical engineering, particularly in the development of 3D in vitro platforms, chicken egg materials have increasingly been investigated as biomaterials due to their distinct advantages such as their low cost, availability, easy handling, gelling ability, bioactivity, and provision of a developmentally stimulating environment for cells. In addition, the chicken egg and its by-products can improve tissue engraftment and stimulate angiogenesis, making it particularly attractive for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. Evidence suggests that the egg white (EW), egg yolk (EY), and eggshell membrane (ESM) are great biomaterial candidates for tissue engineering, as their protein composition resembles mammalian extracellular matrix proteins, ideal for cellular attachment, cellular differentiation, proliferation, and survivability. Moreover, eggshell (ES) is considered an excellent calcium resource for generating hydroxyapatite (HA), making it a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration. This review will provide researchers with a concise yet comprehensive understanding of the chicken egg structure, composition, and associated bioactive molecules in each component and introduce up-to-date tissue engineering applications of chicken eggs as biomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 749 KiB  
Review
Drug Delivery Systems for Personal Healthcare by Smart Wearable Patch System
by Bikram Khadka, Byeongmoon Lee and Ki-Taek Kim
Biomolecules 2023, 13(6), 929; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13060929 - 1 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2137
Abstract
Smart wearable patch systems that combine biosensing and therapeutic components have emerged as promising approaches for personalized healthcare and therapeutic platforms that enable self-administered, noninvasive, user-friendly, and long-acting smart drug delivery. Sensing components can continuously monitor physiological and biochemical parameters, and the monitoring [...] Read more.
Smart wearable patch systems that combine biosensing and therapeutic components have emerged as promising approaches for personalized healthcare and therapeutic platforms that enable self-administered, noninvasive, user-friendly, and long-acting smart drug delivery. Sensing components can continuously monitor physiological and biochemical parameters, and the monitoring signals can be transferred to various stimuli using actuators. In therapeutic components, stimuli-responsive carrier-based drug delivery systems (DDSs) provide on-demand drug delivery in a closed-loop manner. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in smart wearable patch systems, focusing on sensing components, stimuli, and therapeutic components. Additionally, this review highlights the potential of fully integrated smart wearable patch systems for personalized medicine. Furthermore, challenges associated with the clinical applications of this system and future perspectives are discussed, including issues related to drug loading and reloading, biocompatibility, accuracy of sensing and drug delivery, and largescale fabrication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Materials for Biomedical Applications II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop