Advance in Nanoparticles for Tumor Targeting

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological and Bio- Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 3400

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut d’Investigacions Biomédiques Sant Pau, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: nanotechnology; cancer therapy; targeted therapy; protein-based nanoparticles; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A growing number of nanoparticle delivery systems have been developed and approved for clinical use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. The biotechnological advances combining structure, sizes, natures, and the incorporation of active targeting (using molecules such as ligands, antibodies, peptides, and RNA aptamers), together with their functionalization with multiple classes of chemotherapeutics for delivery into tumor cells, have improved the efficacy and reduced toxicity over conventional cancer treatments. The major challenges are now how different combinations of nanoparticle delivery systems can be rationally designed to maximize the efficacy and safety. During cancer progression, tumors become highly heterogeneous, containing different cellular populations such as cancer stem cells, stroma cells, and the tumor microenvironment (TME), which are characterized by distinct molecular features and a different responsivity to therapies. This heterogeneity is the main cause that limits the therapeutic value of many drugs, and it is further associated with a fatal disease. These new molecular and cellular targets could be a key factor in nanopharmaceutical development, allowing for the design of multi-targeting approaches given efficient and precise therapies to increase the clinical impact of cancer treatments.

Dr. Maria Virtudes Céspedes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer therapy
  • chemotherapeutic drug-based nanoparticles
  • targeted nanoparticle-based therapy
  • nanoparticle technology platforms
  • nanocarriers
  • drug delivery

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

19 pages, 4672 KiB  
Article
Lenvatinib-Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanoparticles with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Antibody Conjugation as a Preclinical Approach to Therapeutically Improve Thyroid Cancer with Aggressive Behavior
by Giovanna Revilla, Nuseibah Al Qtaish, Pablo Caruana, Myriam Sainz-Ramos, Tania Lopez-Mendez, Francisco Rodriguez, Verónica Paez-Espinosa, Changda Li, Núria Fucui Vallverdú, Maria Edwards, Antonio Moral, José Ignacio Pérez, Juan Carlos Escolà-Gil, José Luis Pedraz, Idoia Gallego, Rosa Corcoy, María Virtudes Céspedes, Gustavo Puras and Eugènia Mato
Biomolecules 2023, 13(11), 1647; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom13111647 - 13 Nov 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1452
Abstract
Background: Lenvatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of progressive and radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), is associated with significant adverse effects that can be partially mitigated through the development of novel drug formulations. The utilization of nanoparticles [...] Read more.
Background: Lenvatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of progressive and radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), is associated with significant adverse effects that can be partially mitigated through the development of novel drug formulations. The utilization of nanoparticles presents a viable option, as it allows for targeted drug delivery, reducing certain side effects and enhancing the overall quality of life for patients. This study aimed to produce and assess, both in vitro and in vivo, the cytotoxicity, biodistribution, and therapeutic efficacy of lenvatinib-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (NPs), both with and without decoration using antibody conjugation (cetuximab), as a novel therapeutic approach for managing aggressive thyroid tumors. Methods: Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NPs), decorated with or without anti-EGFR, were employed as a lenvatinib delivery system. These NPs were characterized for size distribution, surface morphology, surface charge, and drug encapsulation efficiency. Cytotoxicity was evaluated through MTT assays using two cellular models, one representing normal thyroid cells (Nthy-ori 3-1) and the other representing anaplastic thyroid cells (CAL-62). Additionally, an in vivo xenograft mouse model was established to investigate biodistribution and therapeutic efficacy following intragastric administration. Results: The NPs demonstrated success in terms of particle size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and cetuximab distribution across the surface. In vitro analysis revealed cytotoxicity in both cellular models with both formulations, but only the decorated NPs achieved an ID50 value in CAL-62 cells. Biodistribution analysis following intragastric administration in xenografted thyroid mice demonstrated good stability in terms of intestinal barrier function and tumor accumulation. Both formulations were generally well tolerated without inducing pathological effects in the examined organs. Importantly, both formulations increased tumor necrosis; however, decorated NPs exhibited enhanced parameters related to apoptotic/karyolytic forms, mitotic index, and vascularization compared with NPs without decoration. Conclusions: These proof-of-concept findings suggest a promising strategy for administering TKIs in a more targeted and effective manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Nanoparticles for Tumor Targeting)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

38 pages, 2786 KiB  
Review
Recent Findings on Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines: An Updated Review
by Sara Sheikhlary, David Humberto Lopez, Sophia Moghimi and Bo Sun
Biomolecules 2024, 14(4), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom14040503 - 21 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1328
Abstract
Cancer remains one of the global leading causes of death and various vaccines have been developed over the years against it, including cell-based, nucleic acid-based, and viral-based cancer vaccines. Although many vaccines have been effective in in vivo and clinical studies and some [...] Read more.
Cancer remains one of the global leading causes of death and various vaccines have been developed over the years against it, including cell-based, nucleic acid-based, and viral-based cancer vaccines. Although many vaccines have been effective in in vivo and clinical studies and some have been FDA-approved, there are major limitations to overcome: (1) developing one universal vaccine for a specific cancer is difficult, as tumors with different antigens are different for different individuals, (2) the tumor antigens may be similar to the body’s own antigens, and (3) there is the possibility of cancer recurrence. Therefore, developing personalized cancer vaccines with the ability to distinguish between the tumor and the body’s antigens is indispensable. This paper provides a comprehensive review of different types of cancer vaccines and highlights important factors necessary for developing efficient cancer vaccines. Moreover, the application of other technologies in cancer therapy is discussed. Finally, several insights and conclusions are presented, such as the possibility of using cold plasma and cancer stem cells in developing future cancer vaccines, to tackle the major limitations in the cancer vaccine developmental process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Nanoparticles for Tumor Targeting)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop