Bladder Cancer: Molecular Basis and Translational Research

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Biology and Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 2447

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
University Center of Excellence in Urology, Department of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Urology, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: uro-oncology; bladder cancer; cancer cell biology; bladder cancer cell cultures; bladder cancer organoids; biomarkers; immunotherapy
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Guest Editor
Department of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Urology, University Center of Excellence in Urology, Wrocław Medical University, Wrocław, Poland
Interests: uro-oncology; bladder cancer; upper-tract urothelial carcinoma; endourology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
University Center of Excellence in Urology, Department of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Urology, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-556 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: uro-oncology; lymph node metastasis-growth and immune evasion; minimally invasive surgery; radio-guided surgery; prostate cancer; bladder cancer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a new Special Issue for Biomedicines entitled "Bladder Cancer: From Pathophysiology to Novel Therapeutic Approaches".

Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urinary system, with approximately 500,000 individuals diagnosed annually worldwide. It is a heterogeneous disease associated with various clinical outcomes. The majority of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs) can be managed with total curative intent, while the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is challenging and often multimodal. Despite the standard treatment (radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection), almost 50% of patients with MIBC will eventually develop metastatic disease, which is associated with poor survival rates. The systemic management of advanced or metastatic MIBC primarily consists of platinum-based chemotherapy; however, it provides an approximately 50% response rate with only a 20% five-year overall survival rate. One of the most important discoveries in recent years, facilitating the treatment of advanced or metastatic MIBC, has been the introduction of drugs targeting immune checkpoints: programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor 1 ligand (PD-L1) inhibitors. Nevertheless, despite their efficacy, only a small proportion of patients clearly benefit from such treatment, which is mainly dependent on PD-1/PD-L1 expression levels. Due to the above-mentioned limitations of current bladder cancer therapies, there is an urgent need to promote studies that aim to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying bladder cancer carcinogenesis, progression, and metastasis, as well as develop novel strategies for treating and improving the cancer-specific and overall survival of patients with bladder cancer.

In this Special Issue, we will cover the following research topics:

  • Novel translational models of bladder cancer (3D cellular cultures, organoids) that enable research into bladder cancer carcinogenesis, progression, metastasis, and novel molecularly-targeted therapeutic approaches;
  • The discovery of novel and reliable bladder cancer biomarkers (diagnostic and prognostic);
  • Updates on pharmacological therapeutic approaches, clinical trials, and FDA-approved drugs for the treatment of bladder cancer.

This Special Issue welcomes original research articles, as well as comprehensive reviews, that will provide valuable new data.

Dr. Łukasz Nowak
Dr. Wojciech Krajewski
Dr. Bartosz Małkiewicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bladder cancer
  • preclinical models of bladder cancer
  • molecular characterization
  • biomarkers
  • radical cystectomy
  • chemotherapy
  • immunotherapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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32 pages, 12934 KiB  
Article
Exploring Darunavir, Rilpivirine and Etravirine as Potential Therapies for Bladder Cancer: Efficacy and Synergistic Effects
by Mariana Pereira and Nuno Vale
Biomedicines 2024, 12(3), 647; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12030647 - 14 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This research explores the therapeutic efficacy of Darunavir (DRV), Rilpivirine (RPV), and Etravirine (ETV) against UM-UC-5 bladder cancer cells, addressing the critical need for innovative treatments in bladder cancer research. Through a comprehensive assessment of their individual and combined effects across diverse time [...] Read more.
This research explores the therapeutic efficacy of Darunavir (DRV), Rilpivirine (RPV), and Etravirine (ETV) against UM-UC-5 bladder cancer cells, addressing the critical need for innovative treatments in bladder cancer research. Through a comprehensive assessment of their individual and combined effects across diverse time intervals, ETV emerges as the most potent drug, with a lowest IC50 of 5.9 µM, closely followed by RPV (lowest IC50 of 9.6 µM), while DRV exhibits the least effectiveness (lowest IC50 of 25.6 µM). Notably, a significant synergistic effect is evident in the ETV and RPV combination, especially at 48 and 72 h for low concentrations. Synergies are also observed with ETV and DRV, albeit to a lesser extent and primarily at 48 h. Conversely, the DRV and RPV combination yields minimal effects, predominantly additive in nature. In summary, this pre-clinical investigation underscores the promising therapeutic potential of ETV and RPV, both as standalone treatments and in combination, hinting at repurposing opportunities in bladder cancer therapy, which could give a new treatment method for this disease that is faster and without as severe side effects as anticancer drugs. These findings represent a substantial stride in advancing personalized medicine within cancer research and will be further scrutinized in forthcoming studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bladder Cancer: Molecular Basis and Translational Research)
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Review

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22 pages, 571 KiB  
Review
Urinary Microbiome in Bladder Diseases—Review
by Joanna Chorbińska, Wojciech Krajewski, Łukasz Nowak, Bartosz Małkiewicz, Francesco Del Giudice and Tomasz Szydełko
Biomedicines 2023, 11(10), 2816; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11102816 - 17 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
The microbiome is the totality of microorganisms found in a specific biological niche. It has been proven that in the human body, the microbiome is responsible for its proper functioning. Dysbiosis, i.e., a disturbance in the composition of the microbiome, may be associated [...] Read more.
The microbiome is the totality of microorganisms found in a specific biological niche. It has been proven that in the human body, the microbiome is responsible for its proper functioning. Dysbiosis, i.e., a disturbance in the composition of the microbiome, may be associated with the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Until recently, studies did not focus on the microbiome of the urinary tract, because, since the 19th century, there had been a dogma that urine in healthy people is sterile. Yet, advances in molecular biology techniques have allowed this dogma to be overthrown. The use of DNA sequencing has shown that the urinary tract has its own endogenous microbiome. This discovery enabled further research on the characteristics of the urine microbiomes of healthy people, as well as on the role of the urine microbiome in the pathogenesis of many urological diseases, including bladder diseases. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the urinary microbiome in bladder diseases and to identify potential directions for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bladder Cancer: Molecular Basis and Translational Research)
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