Neurocognitive Disorder: Diagnostic Methods, Treatment Challenges and Future Directions

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 756

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Alexander Campus, International Hellenic University, P.O. Box 141, Sindos, 57400 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: Alzheimer’s disease; clinical neurophysiology; mild cognitive impairment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease with a rising incidence among elderly people. It was first described in 1906 by a clinical psychiatrist and neuroanatomist named Alois Alzheimer. AD is the most common form of dementia and is characterized by progressive memory impairment. The worldwide prevalence of persons with dementia was 35.5 million in 2010, with the number of patients with dementia almost doubling every 20 years, being expected to reach 65.7 million in 2030 and 115.4 million in 2050. The early identification and treatment of patients with dementia should therefore be a public health priority.

In the DSM-5, the terms mild cognitive impairment and dementia were replaced by the terms mild neurocognitive disorder (NCD) and major NCD.

In this Special Issue, we welcome contributions in the form of original research, review articles on the study of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of NCD (neurophysiological, genetic and neuroimaging), as well as articles examining novel methods and future directions for NCD progression, diagnosis and treatment.

Dr. Vasileios Papaliagkas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neurocognitive disorders
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • clinical neurophysiology
  • neuroimaging

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 1374 KiB  
Article
Aging’s Effect on Working Memory—Modality Comparison
by Eyal Heled and Ohad Levi
Biomedicines 2024, 12(4), 835; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12040835 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 488
Abstract
Research exploring the impact of development and aging on working memory (WM) has primarily concentrated on visual and verbal domains, with limited attention paid to the tactile modality. The current study sought to evaluate WM encompassing storage and manipulation across these three modalities, [...] Read more.
Research exploring the impact of development and aging on working memory (WM) has primarily concentrated on visual and verbal domains, with limited attention paid to the tactile modality. The current study sought to evaluate WM encompassing storage and manipulation across these three modalities, spanning from childhood to old age. The study included 134 participants, divided into four age groups: 7–8, 11–12, 25–35, and 60–69. Each participant completed the Visuospatial Span, Digit Span, and Tactual Span, with forward and backward recall. The findings demonstrated a consistent trend in both forward and backward stages. Performance improved until young adulthood, progressively diminishing with advancing age. In the forward stage, the Tactual Span performance was worse than that of the Digit and Visuospatial Span for all participants. In the backward stage, the Visuospatial Span outperformed the Digit and Tactual Span across all age groups. Furthermore, the Tactual Span backward recall exhibited significantly poorer performance than the other modalities, primarily in the youngest and oldest age groups. In conclusion, age impacts WM differently across modalities, with tactile storage capacity being the most vulnerable. Additionally, tactile manipulation skills develop later in childhood but deteriorate sooner in adulthood, indicating a distinct component within tactile WM. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop