Neuropeptides in Biomedicines 2.0

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Neurobiology and Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 3103

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Interests: neuropeptides; granin-derived peptides; eye, skin, and dental pulp; neuroprotection; glaucoma; neovascularization; endocrine orbitopathy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neuropeptides are an ever-growing family of polypeptides, which are widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems and act as neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators. The eye is a suitable model, since it harbors tissues related to the central nervous system, i.e., the retina, whereas the rest of the eye is innervated by the peripheral nervous system, particularly the sympathetic, parasympathetic, and sensory systems. Therefore, this sense organ serves as an ideal tool to explore peptidergic systems, and at present, the eye represents one of the best investigated organs in the body. Neuropeptides are present in the retina in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells, NPY, together with catecholamines in postganglionic sympathetic neurons, VIP; acetylcholine in postganglionic parasympathetic neurons; SP; NKA; CGRP; most granin-derived peptides; and some other peptides in sensory nerves. Their functional role has not been explored as deeply, but in the retina, it is suggested that most of them act as neuromodulators, whereas certain sensory peptides mediate the irritative response in the anterior segment of the eye—a model of neurogenic inflammation. Neuropeptides are known to be present in various other tissues of the body, and although their presence and distribution have been well explored in this case, their functional role is not fully understood, similar to the eye. In this Special Issue, manuscripts examining the presence and distribution of further neuropeptides elsewhere in the body, which have not been investigated to date, as well as studies showing novel functional findings, are welcome.

Dr. Josef Troger
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neuropeptides
  • central nervous system
  • peripheral nervous system
  • sympathetic
  • parasympathetic
  • sensory
  • function

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

50 pages, 40048 KiB  
Review
Involvement of the Opioid Peptide Family in Cancer Progression
by Manuel Lisardo Sánchez, Francisco D. Rodríguez and Rafael Coveñas
Biomedicines 2023, 11(7), 1993; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11071993 - 14 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2676
Abstract
Peptides mediate cancer progression favoring the mitogenesis, migration, and invasion of tumor cells, promoting metastasis and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, and facilitating angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis. Tumor cells overexpress peptide receptors, crucial targets for developing specific treatments against cancer cells using peptide receptor antagonists and promoting apoptosis in [...] Read more.
Peptides mediate cancer progression favoring the mitogenesis, migration, and invasion of tumor cells, promoting metastasis and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, and facilitating angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis. Tumor cells overexpress peptide receptors, crucial targets for developing specific treatments against cancer cells using peptide receptor antagonists and promoting apoptosis in tumor cells. Opioids exert an antitumoral effect, whereas others promote tumor growth and metastasis. This review updates the findings regarding the involvement of opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins) in cancer development. Anticancer therapeutic strategies targeting the opioid peptidergic system and the main research lines to be developed regarding the topic reviewed are suggested. There is much to investigate about opioid peptides and cancer: basic information is scarce, incomplete, or absent in many tumors. This knowledge is crucial since promising anticancer strategies could be developed alone or in combination therapies with chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuropeptides in Biomedicines 2.0)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop