Special Issue "Effect of Neuromuscular Deficit on Gait"

A special issue of Biomechanics (ISSN 2673-7078). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuromechanics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 August 2023) | Viewed by 2803

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gait is a major human movement, and its physiological function is fundamental for a wide range of physical activities (e.g., household chores, sports, transportation, work). However, this movement can be compromised in the existence of any neuromuscular deficit such as muscle weakness, abnormal muscle tone, and coordination. Despite the large number of neurological and orthopedic conditions inducing neuromuscular deficits, few data exist on the concomitant changes in gait. Therefore, this Special Issue invites original research and review papers in both neurological and orthopedic conditions that lead to abnormal gait. We are especially interested in research on the effects of cerebral palsy, cerebrovascular accident, ataxia, Parkinson's disease, and weakness of hip, knees, and ankle muscle groups on gait mechanics and metabolic cost.

Dr. Pantelis T. Nikolaidis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • arm swing
  • assistive device
  • biomechanics
  • center of gravity
  • crouch gait
  • double support
  • gait efficiency
  • kinesiology
  • metabolic cost
  • running
  • stance phase
  • step length
  • stiff leg gait
  • stride length
  • swing phase
  • trendelenburg gait
  • walking

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
On the Optimal Whole-Body Vibration Protocol for Muscle Strength
Biomechanics 2022, 2(4), 547-561; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics2040043 - 19 Oct 2022
Viewed by 2066
Abstract
The application of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) has been demonstrated to be effective in improving muscle strength/power by a number of studies, but an optimal training protocol has never been established. This paper presents a review of studies on the effects of WBV [...] Read more.
The application of Whole Body Vibration (WBV) has been demonstrated to be effective in improving muscle strength/power by a number of studies, but an optimal training protocol has never been established. This paper presents a review of studies on the effects of WBV on muscles and an analysis of data to identify the optimal protocols for the most beneficial neuromuscular responses in terms of vibration frequency, amplitude, knee flexion angle, body posture (standing, sitting, supine, prone), muscle type (quadriceps, hamstrings), and vibration mode (superoinferior, anteroposterior, rotational). Ninety articles were selected for final review from initially selected 2093 articles using PRISMA guidelines. The findings suggest that the beneficial effects of WBV increase with frequency and amplitude but the optimal frequency and amplitude have not been established. The effect of the knee flexion angle is not clear. The optimal WBV protocol should be determined by considering the adverse effects of WBV on all parts of the human body including that related to head acceleration. WBV in sitting or lying positions may provide a better muscle response than standing. Directions for future research are discussed with regard to establishing the optimal WBV protocol as a safe and effective therapeutic/exercise modality for improving muscle strength and health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Neuromuscular Deficit on Gait)
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