Vav Proteins: Key Signaling Players in Health and Disease

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2021) | Viewed by 6238

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 9112102, Israel
Interests: Vav1, an oncogene and a signal transducer protein

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Guest Editor
Centro de Investigación del Cáncer-Cancer Research Center, CSIC-University of Salamanca, Campus Unamuno s/n, E-37007 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: identification of early oncogenic drivers; molecular coadjutants; pathobiological programs involved in cancer development and progression

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Edition will provide an in-depth scope of the Vav proteins. These proteins play cardinal regulator roles as signal transducers in various physiological systems. Due to their important functions, their dysfunction leads to the emergence of various diseases, such as cancer. This Special Edition will follow the discovery of this unique family of proteins, their functions, and their involvement in health and disease.

Prof. Dr. Shulamit Katzav
Prof. Dr. Xose R. Bustelo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Vav
  • GEF 
  • Rho/RacGTPases 
  • Immunology 
  • Cancer

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

11 pages, 941 KiB  
Review
VAV Proteins as Double Agents in Cancer: Oncogenes with Tumor Suppressor Roles
by Myriam Cuadrado and Javier Robles-Valero
Biology 2021, 10(9), 888; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology10090888 - 8 Sep 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2780
Abstract
Guanosine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are responsible for catalyzing the transition of small GTPases from the inactive (GDP-bound) to the active (GTP-bound) states. RHO GEFs, including VAV proteins, play essential signaling roles in a wide variety of fundamental cellular processes and in human [...] Read more.
Guanosine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are responsible for catalyzing the transition of small GTPases from the inactive (GDP-bound) to the active (GTP-bound) states. RHO GEFs, including VAV proteins, play essential signaling roles in a wide variety of fundamental cellular processes and in human diseases. Although the most widespread archetype in the field is that RHO GEFs exert proactive functions in cancer, recent studies in mice and humans are providing new insights into the in vivo function of these proteins in cancer. These results suggest a more complex scenario where the role of GEFs is not so clearly defined. For example, VAV1 can unexpectedly play non-catalytic tumor suppressor functions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by controlling the levels of the active form of NOTCH1 (ICN1). This review focuses on emerging work unveiling tumor suppressor roles for these proteins that should prompt a reevaluation of the role of VAV GEF family in tumor biology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vav Proteins: Key Signaling Players in Health and Disease)
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14 pages, 1532 KiB  
Review
New Functions of Vav Family Proteins in Cardiovascular Biology, Skeletal Muscle, and the Nervous System
by Sonia Rodríguez-Fdez, L. Francisco Lorenzo-Martín, Salvatore Fabbiano, Mauricio Menacho-Márquez, Vincent Sauzeau, Mercedes Dosil and Xosé R. Bustelo
Biology 2021, 10(9), 857; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology10090857 - 1 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2935
Abstract
Vav proteins act as tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated guanosine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho GTPases and as molecular scaffolds. In mammals, this family of signaling proteins is composed of three members (Vav1, Vav2, Vav3) that work downstream of protein tyrosine kinases in a wide variety [...] Read more.
Vav proteins act as tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated guanosine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho GTPases and as molecular scaffolds. In mammals, this family of signaling proteins is composed of three members (Vav1, Vav2, Vav3) that work downstream of protein tyrosine kinases in a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent work with genetically modified mouse models has revealed that these proteins play key signaling roles in vascular smooth and skeletal muscle cells, specific neuronal subtypes, and glia cells. These functions, in turn, ensure the proper regulation of blood pressure levels, skeletal muscle mass, axonal wiring, and fiber myelination events as well as systemic metabolic balance. The study of these mice has also led to the discovery of new physiological interconnection among tissues that contribute to the ontogeny and progression of different pathologies such as, for example, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Here, we provide an integrated view of all these new Vav family-dependent signaling and physiological functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vav Proteins: Key Signaling Players in Health and Disease)
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