Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Treatment

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 7379

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
BioMolecular Engineering Program, Department of Physics & Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3109, USA
Interests: drug delivery; biomaterials; biopolymers; hydrogel; tissue engineering; cancer treatment; bioprinting; micro/nanotechnology; nanoparticle biosynthesis

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Guest Editor
School of Mechanical Engineering, Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore 632014, India
Interests: biomaterials; nanocarriers; stem cells; drug delivery; organ engineering
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer remains a leading cause of death, although significant progresses have been made toward cancer treatment. Novel drug delivery systems are critical toward effective cancer treatment in addition to the discovery of drug molecules themselves. Novel drug delivery systems of various scales and shapes show great promise in improving cancer treatment efficacy, especially in relieving drug resistance. Some state-of-the-art approaches include targeting cancer cells and releasing drugs utilizing tumor microenvironment-responsiveness of the drug carriers. Moreover, drug delivery to cancer stem-like cells needs further research as they are highly involved in drug resistance and metastasis.

This Special Issue on “Novel Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Treatment” focuses on original research papers and comprehensive reviews which investigate multiscale novel drug delivery systems for effective cancer treatment, especially targeting cancer stem-like cells and drug resistance. Topics of interest for this Special Issue include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Novel microscale drug delivery systems, such as microspheres and microcapsules, for cancer treatment;
  2. Novel nanoscale drug delivery systems, such as nanoparticles and nanofibers, for cancer treatment;
  3. Novel targeted drug delivery systems for cancer treatment;
  4. Development of in vitro tumor models for anti-cancer therapeutics testing;
  5. Tumor microenvironment-responsive, such as heat and pH, drug delivery systems for cancer treatment;
  6. Novel drug delivery systems overcoming cancer cell drug resistance;
  7. Drug delivery to cancer stem-like cells.

Dr. Wujie Zhang
Prof. Dr. Murugan Ramalingam
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • cancer treatment
  • controlled release
  • sustained release
  • drug targeting
  • microcarrier
  • nanocarrier
  • tumor microenvironment-responsive
  • cancer stem-like cells

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 2923 KiB  
Article
Designing Patient-Driven, Tissue-Engineered Models of Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer
by Garrett F. Beeghly, Candace Thomas, Jessica X. Yuan, Alexandra R. Harris and Jennifer M. Munson
Bioengineering 2022, 9(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9020044 - 18 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2676
Abstract
The rising survival rate for early-stage breast cancer in the United States has created an expanding population of women in remission at risk for distant recurrence, with metastatic spread to the brain demonstrating an especially poor prognosis. The current standard of care for [...] Read more.
The rising survival rate for early-stage breast cancer in the United States has created an expanding population of women in remission at risk for distant recurrence, with metastatic spread to the brain demonstrating an especially poor prognosis. The current standard of care for breast cancer brain metastases is not well defined or differentiated from the treatment of brain metastases from other primary sites. Here, we present tissue-engineered models of the primary and brain metastatic breast cancer microenvironments informed by analysis of patient tumor resections. We find that metastatic resections demonstrate distinct cellular and matrix components compared with primary resections or non-cancerous controls. Using our model systems, we find that the observed deposition of collagen I after metastasis to the brain may enhance breast cancer invasion. Future optimization of these models will present a novel platform to examine tumor-stroma interactions and screen therapeutics for the management of metastatic breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Treatment)
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Review

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22 pages, 2939 KiB  
Review
Flavonoids-Based Delivery Systems towards Cancer Therapies
by Miguel Ferreira, Diana Costa and Ângela Sousa
Bioengineering 2022, 9(5), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9050197 - 2 May 2022
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3864
Abstract
Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Cervical cancer, for instance, is considered a major scourge in low-income countries. Its development is mostly associated with the human papillomavirus persistent infection and despite the availability of preventive vaccines, they are only widely [...] Read more.
Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Cervical cancer, for instance, is considered a major scourge in low-income countries. Its development is mostly associated with the human papillomavirus persistent infection and despite the availability of preventive vaccines, they are only widely administered in more developed countries, thus leaving a large percentage of unvaccinated women highly susceptible to this type of cancer. Current treatments are based on invasive techniques, being far from effective. Therefore, the search for novel, advanced and personalized therapeutic approaches is imperative. Flavonoids belong to a group of natural polyphenolic compounds, well recognized for their great anticancer capacity, thus promising to be incorporated in cancer therapy protocols. However, their use is limited due to their low solubility, stability and bioavailability. To surpass these limitations, the encapsulation of flavonoids into delivery systems emerged as a valuable strategy to improve their stability and bioavailability. In this context, the aim of this review is to present the most reliable flavonoids-based delivery systems developed for anticancer therapies and the progress accomplished, with a special focus on cervical cancer therapy. The gathered information revealed the high therapeutic potential of flavonoids and highlights the relevance of delivery systems application, allowing a better understanding for future studies on effective cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Treatment)
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