Advances in Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1555

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
Interests: development and applications of novel homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts; development of polymers and materials for sustainable and clean energy and smart material research; novel nanomaterials for biological applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioengineering is running a Special Issue on "Advances in Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications". This is an important and exciting research topic with broad applications in the field of tissue engineering and wound healing. We believe the topic will offer an effective way to present your original research or review articles, which will be highly visible to the scientific community.

Authors are encouraged to explore different applications of hydrogels in tissue engineering, such as cartilage, skin and bone regeneration, wound healing, cardiovascular tissue engineering, neural tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems. Through these various applications, this Special Issue seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of the potential of hydrogels for tissue engineering.

Overall, this Special Issue aims to present state-of-the-art research on hydrogels and their applications in tissue engineering, providing a platform for researchers to share their findings and insights. It will foster collaboration and innovation in the field, ultimately contributing to developing advanced hydrogel-based tissue regeneration and repair strategies.

Dr. Anindya Ghosh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tissue engineering
  • hydrogel
  • bone tissue
  • skin tissue
  • neural tissue engineering
  • cardiovascular tissue
  • wound healing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 3088 KiB  
Article
Human Induced Pluripotent Spheroids’ Growth Is Driven by Viscoelastic Properties and Macrostructure of 3D Hydrogel Environment
by Lucas Lemarié, Tanushri Dargar, Isabelle Grosjean, Vincent Gache, Edwin J. Courtial and Jérôme Sohier
Bioengineering 2023, 10(12), 1418; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10121418 - 13 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1353
Abstract
Stem cells, particularly human iPSCs, constitute a powerful tool for tissue engineering, notably through spheroid and organoid models. While the sensitivity of stem cells to the viscoelastic properties of their direct microenvironment is well-described, stem cell differentiation still relies on biochemical factors. Our [...] Read more.
Stem cells, particularly human iPSCs, constitute a powerful tool for tissue engineering, notably through spheroid and organoid models. While the sensitivity of stem cells to the viscoelastic properties of their direct microenvironment is well-described, stem cell differentiation still relies on biochemical factors. Our aim is to investigate the role of the viscoelastic properties of hiPSC spheroids’ direct environment on their fate. To ensure that cell growth is driven only by mechanical interaction, bioprintable alginate–gelatin hydrogels with significantly different viscoelastic properties were utilized in differentiation factor-free culture medium. Alginate–gelatin hydrogels of varying concentrations were developed to provide 3D environments of significantly different mechanical properties, ranging from 1 to 100 kPa, while allowing printability. hiPSC spheroids from two different cell lines were prepared by aggregation (⌀ = 100 µm, n > 1 × 104), included and cultured in the different hydrogels for 14 days. While spheroids within dense hydrogels exhibited limited growth, irrespective of formulation, porous hydrogels prepared with a liquid–liquid emulsion method displayed significant variations of spheroid morphology and growth as a function of hydrogel mechanical properties. Transversal culture (adjacent spheroids-laden alginate–gelatin hydrogels) clearly confirmed the separate effect of each hydrogel environment on hiPSC spheroid behavior. This study is the first to demonstrate that a mechanically modulated microenvironment induces diverse hiPSC spheroid behavior without the influence of other factors. It allows one to envision the combination of multiple formulations to create a complex object, where the fate of hiPSCs will be independently controlled by their direct microenvironment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering Applications)
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