Biomaterials in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 4595

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials (LIMAV), Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program (PPGCM), Federal University of Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI, Brazil.
Interests: tissue engineering; nanotechnology; biomaterials

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Guest Editor
Bioengineering Program, Scientific and Technological Institute, Brazil University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
Interests: 3D bioprinting; tissue engineering; musculoskeletal system; biofabrication; biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that aims to regenerate and repair damaged tissues by combining cells, biomaterials, and growth factors. In particular, bone and cartilage tissue engineering have emerged as promising approaches for the treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders. Biomaterials play a crucial role in these tissue engineering approaches by providing a scaffold for cells to attach, proliferate, and differentiate, as well as by controlling the release of growth factors to promote tissue regeneration.

The Special Issue of the journal Bioengineering aims to provide a platform for researchers to share their latest findings and advances in the use of biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. The scope of the issue includes the design, synthesis, and characterization of biomaterials, as well as their applications in cell culture, animal models, and clinical studies. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, natural and synthetic biomaterials, scaffolds, hydrogels, micro- and nanofabrication, and drug delivery systems.

The issue welcomes original research articles, reviews, and perspectives, and invites authors to submit their work for consideration. By sharing their knowledge and expertise, this Special Issue aims to advance the field of bone and cartilage tissue engineering and ultimately improve patient outcomes.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Jay Webster
Prof. Dr. Thiago Domingues Stocco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • bone
  • cartilage
  • tissue engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4122 KiB  
Article
Fabrication of a Novel 3D Extrusion Bioink Containing Processed Human Articular Cartilage Matrix for Cartilage Tissue Engineering
by Alexandra Hunter Aitchison, Nicholas B. Allen, Isabel R. Shaffrey, Conor N. O’Neill, Bijan Abar, Albert T. Anastasio and Samuel B. Adams
Bioengineering 2024, 11(4), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11040329 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 817
Abstract
Cartilage damage presents a significant clinical challenge due to its intrinsic avascular nature which limits self-repair. Addressing this, our study focuses on an alginate-based bioink, integrating human articular cartilage, for cartilage tissue engineering. This novel bioink was formulated by encapsulating C20A4 human articular [...] Read more.
Cartilage damage presents a significant clinical challenge due to its intrinsic avascular nature which limits self-repair. Addressing this, our study focuses on an alginate-based bioink, integrating human articular cartilage, for cartilage tissue engineering. This novel bioink was formulated by encapsulating C20A4 human articular chondrocytes in sodium alginate, polyvinyl alcohol, gum arabic, and cartilage extracellular matrix powder sourced from allograft femoral condyle shavings. Using a 3D bioprinter, constructs were biofabricated and cross-linked, followed by culture in standard medium. Evaluations were conducted on cellular viability and gene expression at various stages. Results indicated that the printed constructs maintained a porous structure conducive to cell growth. Cellular viability was 87% post printing, which decreased to 76% after seven days, and significantly recovered to 86% by day 14. There was also a notable upregulation of chondrogenic genes, COL2A1 (p = 0.008) and SOX9 (p = 0.021), suggesting an enhancement in cartilage formation. This study concludes that the innovative bioink shows promise for cartilage regeneration, demonstrating substantial viability and gene expression conducive to repair and suggesting its potential for future therapeutic applications in cartilage repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering)
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23 pages, 5634 KiB  
Article
Ovine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Chondrogenesis on a Novel 3D-Printed Hybrid Scaffold In Vitro
by Arianna De Mori, Agathe Heyraud, Francesca Tallia, Gordon Blunn, Julian R. Jones, Tosca Roncada, Justin Cobb and Talal Al-Jabri
Bioengineering 2024, 11(2), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11020112 - 24 Jan 2024
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Abstract
This study evaluated the use of silica/poly(tetrahydrofuran)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (SiO2/PTHF/PCL-diCOOH) 3D-printed scaffolds, with channel sizes of either 200 (SC-200) or 500 (SC-500) µm, as biomaterials to support the chondrogenesis of sheep bone marrow stem cells (oBMSC), under in vitro conditions. The objective was [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the use of silica/poly(tetrahydrofuran)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (SiO2/PTHF/PCL-diCOOH) 3D-printed scaffolds, with channel sizes of either 200 (SC-200) or 500 (SC-500) µm, as biomaterials to support the chondrogenesis of sheep bone marrow stem cells (oBMSC), under in vitro conditions. The objective was to validate the potential use of SiO2/PTHF/PCL-diCOOH for prospective in vivo ovine studies. The behaviour of oBMSC, with and without the use of exogenous growth factors, on SiO2/PTHF/PCL-diCOOH scaffolds was investigated by analysing cell attachment, viability, proliferation, morphology, expression of chondrogenic genes (RT-qPCR), deposition of aggrecan, collagen II, and collagen I (immunohistochemistry), and quantification of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The results showed that all the scaffolds supported cell attachment and proliferation with upregulation of chondrogenic markers and the deposition of a cartilage extracellular matrix (collagen II and aggrecan). Notably, SC-200 showed superior performance in terms of cartilage gene expression. These findings demonstrated that SiO2/PTHF/PCL-diCOOH with 200 µm pore size are optimal for promoting chondrogenic differentiation of oBMSC, even without the use of growth factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering)
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16 pages, 8094 KiB  
Article
Effect of Uniaxial Compression Frequency on Osteogenic Cell Responses in Dynamic 3D Cultures
by Georgia-Ioanna Kontogianni, Konstantinos Loukelis, Amedeo Franco Bonatti, Elisa Batoni, Carmelo De Maria, Raasti Naseem, Kenneth Dalgarno, Giovanni Vozzi, David B. MacManus, Subrata Mondal, Nicholas Dunne, Chiara Vitale-Brovarone and Maria Chatzinikolaidou
Bioengineering 2023, 10(5), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10050532 - 27 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1838
Abstract
The application of mechanical stimulation on bone tissue engineering constructs aims to mimic the native dynamic nature of bone. Although many attempts have been made to evaluate the effect of applied mechanical stimuli on osteogenic differentiation, the conditions that govern this process have [...] Read more.
The application of mechanical stimulation on bone tissue engineering constructs aims to mimic the native dynamic nature of bone. Although many attempts have been made to evaluate the effect of applied mechanical stimuli on osteogenic differentiation, the conditions that govern this process have not yet been fully explored. In this study, pre-osteoblastic cells were seeded on PLLA/PCL/PHBV (90/5/5 wt.%) polymeric blend scaffolds. The constructs were subjected every day to cyclic uniaxial compression for 40 min at a displacement of 400 μm, using three frequency values, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 Hz, for up to 21 days, and their osteogenic response was compared to that of static cultures. Finite element simulation was performed to validate the scaffold design and the loading direction, and to assure that cells inside the scaffolds would be subjected to significant levels of strain during stimulation. None of the applied loading conditions negatively affected the cell viability. The alkaline phosphatase activity data indicated significantly higher values at all dynamic conditions compared to the static ones at day 7, with the highest response being observed at 0.5 Hz. Collagen and calcium production were significantly increased compared to static controls. These results indicate that all of the examined frequencies substantially promoted the osteogenic capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering)
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