Recent Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Volume 2

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 3190

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
2. Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Interests: imaging; biomedical imaging
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomedical imaging has arguably demonstrated the most rapid advancements in the entire biomedical field in the past decade. Besides the expansion of established imaging instrumentation into broader applications in tissue, cellular, and molecular diagnostic imaging, there have been substantial modifications in the imaging protocols that have advanced the capabilities of these existing imaging modalities. Technological advancements are stimulating further novel approaches in diagnosis and measuring as well as monitoring the outcomes of treatments. The adaptation of innovations in imaging technologies, methods, and protocols for broader applications is often limited by the inability to share an innovation with investigators outside the likely narrow field in which it originated. Therefore, it is crucial to facilitate the sharing of such advances in biomedical imaging occurring in one field with other fields. A broader vision with which to explore the full potential of an innovation often requires adding a new, perhaps outside, perspective. This Special Issue of Bioengineering aims to serve as a medium for such interdisciplinary exchange and the stimulation of the expansion of applications of innovations, perhaps by facilitating new collaborations between various fields and investigators. The next big breakthrough in biomedical imaging may come from diverse areas of expertise coming together and finding new ways forward.

This is the second volume of our Special Issue, "Recent Advances in Biomedical Imaging". Please feel free to download and read it freely via the following link:
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/bioengineering/special_issues/24F01PJ541

Dr. Cuneyt M. Alper
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 5173 KiB  
Article
Monte Carlo-Based Optical Simulation of Optical Distribution in Deep Brain Tissues Using Sixteen Optical Sources
by Xi Yang, Chengpeng Chai, Hongzhi Zuo, Yun-Hsuan Chen, Junhui Shi, Cheng Ma and Mohamad Sawan
Bioengineering 2024, 11(3), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11030260 - 7 Mar 2024
Viewed by 978
Abstract
Optical-based imaging has improved from early single-location research to further sophisticated imaging in 2D topography and 3D tomography. These techniques have the benefit of high specificity and non-radiative safety for brain detection and therapy. However, their performance is limited by complex tissue structures. [...] Read more.
Optical-based imaging has improved from early single-location research to further sophisticated imaging in 2D topography and 3D tomography. These techniques have the benefit of high specificity and non-radiative safety for brain detection and therapy. However, their performance is limited by complex tissue structures. To overcome the difficulty in successful brain imaging applications, we conducted a simulation using 16 optical source types within a brain model that is based on the Monte Carlo method. In addition, we propose an evaluation method of the optical propagating depth and resolution, specifically one based on the optical distribution for brain applications. Based on the results, the best optical source types were determined in each layer. The maximum propagating depth and corresponding source were extracted. The optical source propagating field width was acquired in different depths. The maximum and minimum widths, as well as the corresponding source, were determined. This paper provides a reference for evaluating the optical propagating depth and resolution from an optical simulation aspect, and it has the potential to optimize the performance of optical-based techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Volume 2)
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13 pages, 2773 KiB  
Article
Development and Utility of an Imaging System for Internal Dosimetry of Astatine-211 in Mice
by Atsushi Yagishita, Miho Katsuragawa, Shin’ichiro Takeda, Yoshifumi Shirakami, Kazuhiro Ooe, Atsushi Toyoshima, Tadayuki Takahashi and Tadashi Watabe
Bioengineering 2024, 11(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11010025 - 26 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1001
Abstract
In targeted radionuclide therapy, determining the absorbed dose of the ligand distributed to the whole body is vital due to its direct influence on therapeutic and adverse effects. However, many targeted alpha therapy drugs present challenges for in vivo quantitative imaging. To address [...] Read more.
In targeted radionuclide therapy, determining the absorbed dose of the ligand distributed to the whole body is vital due to its direct influence on therapeutic and adverse effects. However, many targeted alpha therapy drugs present challenges for in vivo quantitative imaging. To address this issue, we developed a planar imaging system equipped with a cadmium telluride semiconductor detector that offers high energy resolution. This system also comprised a 3D-printed tungsten collimator optimized for high sensitivity to astatine-211, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, and adequate spatial resolution for mouse imaging. The imager revealed a spectrum with a distinct peak for X-rays from astatine-211 owing to the high energy resolution, clearly distinguishing these X-rays from the fluorescent X-rays of tungsten. High collimator efficiency (4.5 × 10−4) was achieved, with the maintenance of the spatial resolution required for discerning mouse tissues. Using this system, the activity of astatine-211 in thyroid cancer tumors with and without the expression of the sodium iodide symporter (K1-NIS/K1, respectively) was evaluated through in vivo imaging. The K1-NIS tumors had significantly higher astatine-211 activity (sign test, p = 0.031, n = 6) and significantly decreased post-treatment tumor volume (Student’s t-test, p = 0.005, n = 6). The concurrent examination of intratumor drug distribution and treatment outcome could be performed with the same mice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Volume 2)
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15 pages, 6318 KiB  
Article
Automated Segmentation and Measurements of Pulmonary Cysts in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis across Multiple CT Scanner Platforms over a Period of Two Decades
by Simone Lee, Alfredo Lebron, Brianna Matthew, Joel Moss and Han Wen
Bioengineering 2023, 10(11), 1255; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10111255 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 967
Abstract
(1) Background: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis is a genetic disease that affects mostly women of childbearing age. In the lungs, it manifests as the progressive formation of air-filled cysts and is associated with a decline in lung function. With a median survival of 29 years after [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis is a genetic disease that affects mostly women of childbearing age. In the lungs, it manifests as the progressive formation of air-filled cysts and is associated with a decline in lung function. With a median survival of 29 years after the onset of symptoms, computed-tomographic monitoring of cystic changes in the lungs is a key part of the management of the disease. However, the current standard method to measure cyst burdens from CT is semi-automatic and requires manual adjustments from trained operators to obtain consistent results due to variabilities in CT technology and imaging conditions over the long course of the disease. This can be impractical for longitudinal studies involving large numbers of scans and is susceptible to subjective biases. (2) Methods: We developed an automated method of pulmonary cyst segmentation for chest CT images incorporating novel graphics processing algorithms. We assessed its performance against the gold-standard semi-automated method performed by experienced operators who were blinded to the results of the automated method. (3) Results: the automated method had the same consistency over time as the gold-standard method, but its cyst scores were more strongly correlated with concurrent pulmonary function results from the physiology laboratory than those of the gold-standard method. (4) Conclusions: The automated cyst segmentation is a competent replacement for the gold-standard semi-automated process. It is a solution for saving time and labor in clinical studies of lymphangioleiomyomatosis that may involve large numbers of chest CT scans from diverse scanner platforms and protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Volume 2)
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