Recent Advances in Biomechanics of Soft Tissues

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 3007

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. School of Biomedical Engineering, Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030, China
2. Engineering Research Center of Digital Medicine and Clinical Translation, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030, China
Interests: soft tissue biomechanics; cellular biomechanics; finite element analysis; rehabilitation engineering; multimodal ultrasound

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Guest Editor
Department of Arthroscopic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233, China
Interests: sports medicine; orthodontics; orthopedic surgery

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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Biomechanics and Mechanobiology (Beihang University), Ministry of Education, Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Biomedical Engineering, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: injury and rehabilitation biomechanics; biomechanics; biomaterials; 3D printing rehabilitation engineering; biomechanical modeling of injuries, diseases, diagnoses, treatments of humans and so on
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
Interests: rehabilitation engineering; biomechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue of “Biomechanics of Soft Tissue” aims to publish research articles with original and substantial findings using the principles of biomechanics, as well as state-of-art engineering approaches, to explore soft tissue problems. Computational analysis, as well as experimental in vitro or in vivo papers, may be submitted. The criteria for the acceptance of manuscripts include excellence, novelty, significance, clarity, conciseness and interest to the readership. Papers published in the journal may cover a wide range of topics in soft tissue biomechanics, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Mechanics of soft tissues;
  • Mechanics of cells;
  • Biomechanics in engineered tissue or biomaterials;
  • Injury biomechanics in soft tissues;
  • Mechanics of prosthetics and orthotics interaction with soft tissue.

Dr. Yifei Yao
Dr. Jinzhong Zhao
Prof. Dr. Lizhen Wang
Dr. Wenxin Niu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-linear mechanical properties in soft tissues
  • mechananobiology
  • finite element analysis
  • biomechanics in engineered tissue or biomaterials
  • injury biomechanics in soft tissues
  • interaction with soft tissues
  • rehabilitation engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 10195 KiB  
Article
Comparison of the Biomechanical Properties between Healthy and Whole Human and Porcine Stomachs
by Feifei Li, Jiannan Liu, Xiaoyun Liu, Yaobin Wu, Lei Qian, Wenhua Huang and Yanbing Li
Bioengineering 2024, 11(3), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11030233 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 918
Abstract
Gastric cancer poses a societal and economic burden, prompting an exploration into the development of materials suitable for gastric reconstruction. However, there is a dearth of studies on the mechanical properties of porcine and human stomachs. Therefore, this study was conducted to elucidate [...] Read more.
Gastric cancer poses a societal and economic burden, prompting an exploration into the development of materials suitable for gastric reconstruction. However, there is a dearth of studies on the mechanical properties of porcine and human stomachs. Therefore, this study was conducted to elucidate their mechanical properties, focusing on interspecies correlations. Stress relaxation and tensile tests assessed the hyperelastic and viscoelastic characteristics of porcine and human stomachs. The thickness, stress–strain curve, elastic modulus, and stress relaxation were assessed. Porcine stomachs were significantly thicker than human stomachs. The stiffness contrast between porcine and human stomachs was evident. Porcine stomachs demonstrated varying elastic modulus values, with the highest in the longitudinal mucosa layer of the corpus and the lowest in the longitudinal intact layer of the fundus. In human stomachs, the elastic modulus of the longitudinal muscular layer of the antrum was the highest, whereas that of the circumferential muscularis layer of the corpus was the lowest. The degree of stress relaxation was higher in human stomachs than in porcine stomachs. This study comprehensively elucidated the differences between porcine and human stomachs attributable to variations across different regions and tissue layers, providing essential biomechanical support for subsequent studies in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biomechanics of Soft Tissues)
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16 pages, 2877 KiB  
Article
Full-Field Strain Measurements of the Muscle-Tendon Junction Using X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Volume Correlation
by Nodoka Iwasaki, Aikaterina Karali, Marta Roldo and Gordon Blunn
Bioengineering 2024, 11(2), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11020162 - 6 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1313
Abstract
We report, for the first time, the full-field 3D strain distribution of the muscle-tendon junction (MTJ). Understanding the strain distribution at the junction is crucial for the treatment of injuries and to predict tear formation at this location. Three-dimensional full-field strain distribution of [...] Read more.
We report, for the first time, the full-field 3D strain distribution of the muscle-tendon junction (MTJ). Understanding the strain distribution at the junction is crucial for the treatment of injuries and to predict tear formation at this location. Three-dimensional full-field strain distribution of mouse MTJ was measured using X-ray computer tomography (XCT) combined with digital volume correlation (DVC) with the aim of understanding the mechanical behavior of the junction under tensile loading. The interface between the Achilles tendon and the gastrocnemius muscle was harvested from adult mice and stained using 1% phosphotungstic acid in 70% ethanol. In situ XCT combined with DVC was used to image and compute strain distribution at the MTJ under a tensile load (2.4 N). High strain measuring 120,000 µε, 160,000 µε, and 120,000 µε for the first principal stain (εp1), shear strain (γ), and von Mises strain (εVM), respectively, was measured at the MTJ and these values reduced into the body of the muscle or into the tendon. Strain is concentrated at the MTJ, which is at risk of being damaged in activities associated with excessive physical activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Biomechanics of Soft Tissues)
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