Novel Treatment Technologies in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1114

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Elson S. Floyd Washington State University College of Medicine, 412 E. Spokane Falls Boulevard, Spokane, WA 99202, USA
Interests: orthopedic surgery; physical medicine and rehabilitation; sports medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, several novels and exciting technologies have emerged. Often, the aim of these technologies is the recovery of a particular functional task, either towards a return to the normal performance of the task or the development of an innovative compensatory strategy. Rehabilitation Medicine addresses a wide swath of the bioengineering domain, with new methodologies aimed at the recovery of movement via the creation of new neurological pathways or the more efficient application of existing nerve tracks. A recent development has been the implantation of electrodes into the brain, and “wholly” controlling the axial skeleton. Other research has been focused on the recovery of functional independence, related to regaining the activities of daily living. This can include the treatment/management of topics as diverse as dysphagia, aphasia (and other communication), plus a return to community activities via, for example, driving or enhanced transfers.

The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • Brain/peripheral nervous interplay (related to spinal cord injury, stroke)
  • Gait propagation (including gait training with and without robotic assist, spasticity management)
  • Gait initiation and recovery from perturbation (notable with Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis)
  • Recovery of upper-extremity fine motor skills (with, without robotic assist) after Central Nervous System disease or injury (e.g. stroke);
  • Adaption of new technologies developed for non-medical use now used in the treatment of patients (e.g., WII technologies)
  • Management of dysphagia (post-stroke, ALS, etc.)
  • Pharmalogical intervention in rehabilitation therapies (speech and language pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy)

Dr. Ross Alan Bogey
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • spinal cord injury
  • stroke
  • robotic assisted
  • gait training
  • physical therapy
  • rehabilitation medicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 2019 KiB  
Article
A Training Program Using Modified Joystick-Operated Ride-on Toys to Complement Conventional Upper Extremity Rehabilitation in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Results from a Pilot Study
by Sudha Srinivasan, Patrick Kumavor and Kristin Morgan
Bioengineering 2024, 11(4), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11040304 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 781
Abstract
The pilot study assessed the utility of a training program using modified, commercially available dual-joystick-operated ride-on toys to promote unimanual and bimanual upper extremity (UE) function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The ride-on-toy training was integrated within a 3-week, intensive, task-oriented training [...] Read more.
The pilot study assessed the utility of a training program using modified, commercially available dual-joystick-operated ride-on toys to promote unimanual and bimanual upper extremity (UE) function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The ride-on-toy training was integrated within a 3-week, intensive, task-oriented training camp for children with CP. Eleven children with hemiplegia between 4 and 10 years received the ride-on-toy training program 20–30 min/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. Unimanual motor function was assessed using the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) before and after the camp. During ride-on-toy training sessions, children wore activity monitors on both wrists to assess the duration and intensity of bimanual UE activity. Video data from early and late sessions were coded for bimanual UE use, independent navigation, and movement bouts. Children improved their total and subscale QUEST scores from pretest to post-test while increasing moderate activity in their affected UE from early to late sessions, demonstrating more equal use of both UEs across sessions. There were no significant changes in the rates of movement bouts from early to late sessions. We can conclude that joystick-operated ride-on toys function as child-friendly, intrinsically rewarding tools that can complement conventional therapy and promote bimanual motor functions in children with CP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Treatment Technologies in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation)
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