Hybrid and Composite Biomaterials for Healthcare: Toward Innovative Approaches

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 780

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CIRIMAT, University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse INP, 31000 Toulouse, France
Interests: bioceramics; bioactive compounds; cold sintering; surface engineering; bone regeneration; nanomedicine; smart colloidal nanoparticles/hybrids
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CIRIMAT, University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse INP, 31000 Toulouse, France
Interests: composites; amorphous compounds; biomaterials; bioactive coatings; 3D printing; nanoparticle surface functionalization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several biomedical applications require 2D/3D supports or “scaffolds” for favoring cell colonization and activity and allow tissue repair. This is the case, for example, in bone regeneration and wound healing, but also for the development of matrices for in vitro 3D cell cultures, up to the fabrication of organoids. In all cases, in addition to being biocompatible, such engineered scaffolds should display adapted mechanical resistance and/or flexibility, a propitious surface state for the envisioned application, and possible biodegradability. Furthermore, in view of obtaining an optimal biological response, the scaffolds may advantageously exhibit bioactive features which may be either intrinsic to the constitution of the scaffold itself or conveyed by association with biologically active ions or (bio)molecules/drugs. To reach these multifold goals, a combination of several components in the constitution of these biomaterials can prove particularly relevant in view of enhanced or complementary properties, leading to composite or hybrid systems: while composites essentially involve “physical” interactions between the phases (organic, mineral, metallic), hybrids encompass more “chemical” interactions down to the molecular scale. Synergistic effects may then be obtained through the adequate selection of the constituting subparts of the composite/hybrid biomaterials. Whether aiming at the fabrication of implantable medical devices or developing in vitro supports for cells, novel strategies are being developed toward more efficient and less invasive approaches for tomorrow’s medicine.

In this context, this Special Issue aims to gather, in a single open-access Special Issue, the latest innovative approaches regarding 2D or 3D hybrid or composite biomaterials, possibly associated with ionic or molecular active agents, where the intrinsic characteristics of each component bring specific added-value features in view of improved biological response.

Considering your expertise in the domain, it is our pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. Reviews, full papers, and short communications would be greatly appreciated.

Dr. Christophe Drouet
Dr. Sylvain Le Grill
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hybrids
  • composites
  • 2D and 3D scaffolds
  • additive manufacturing
  • cold sintering
  • bone regeneration
  • wound healing
  • architectured materials
  • 3D cell culture
  • organoids

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 4293 KiB  
Article
Hybrid Materials for Vascular Applications: A Preliminary In Vitro Assessment
by Martina Todesco, Martina Casarin, Deborah Sandrin, Laura Astolfi, Filippo Romanato, Germana Giuggioli, Fabio Conte, Gino Gerosa, Chiara Giulia Fontanella and Andrea Bagno
Bioengineering 2024, 11(5), 436; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11050436 - 28 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The production of biomedical devices able to appropriately interact with the biological environment is still a great challenge. Synthetic materials are often employed, but they fail to replicate the biological and functional properties of native tissues, leading to a variety of adverse effects. [...] Read more.
The production of biomedical devices able to appropriately interact with the biological environment is still a great challenge. Synthetic materials are often employed, but they fail to replicate the biological and functional properties of native tissues, leading to a variety of adverse effects. Several commercial products are based on chemically treated xenogeneic tissues: their principal drawback is due to weak mechanical stability and low durability. Recently, decellularization has been proposed to bypass the drawbacks of both synthetic and biological materials. Acellular materials can integrate with host tissues avoiding/mitigating any foreign body response, but they often lack sufficient patency and impermeability. The present paper investigates an innovative approach to the realization of hybrid materials that combine decellularized bovine pericardium with polycarbonate urethanes. These hybrid materials benefit from the superior biocompatibility of the biological tissue and the mechanical properties of the synthetic polymers. They were assessed from physicochemical, structural, mechanical, and biological points of view; their ability to promote cell growth was also investigated. The decellularized pericardium and the polymer appeared to well adhere to each other, and the two sides were distinguishable. The maximum elongation of hybrid materials was mainly affected by the pericardium, which allows for lower elongation than the polymer; this latter, in turn, influenced the maximum strength achieved. The results confirmed the promising features of hybrid materials for the production of vascular grafts able to be repopulated by circulating cells, thus, improving blood compatibility. Full article
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