Biomaterials for Bone and Cartilage Engineering Application

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 5342

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Research, Taipei Medical University/Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
2. Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University/Shuang-Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan
Interests: bone and cartilage engineering; biomaterials; nanoprobes; stem cell; bioreactor; optical imaging
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue on ‘Biomaterials in Bone and Cartilage Engineering Application’ is to fabricate biocompatible scaffolds that facilitate the regenerative capacity of bone and cartilage tissue. Specially designed biomaterials ideally protect wounds against material-induced pyrogen and/or infections, which may cause prolonged inflammation and repair failure. To obtain a bone and cartilage regeneration, ideal and smart biocompatible materials are highly demanded in clinic. ‘Biomaterials in Bone and Cartilage Engineering Application’ will publish original studies on, but not limited to, cell and molecular biology, developmental biology, genetics, structural biology, infection and immunity, immunology, signaling, disease mechanisms, therapeutics, and nanotechnology related to the biomaterial and tissue/cell interactions. Papers considered for peer review must contain substantial advances supported by regenerative insights. 

Prof. Dr. Wen-Fu Lai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bone and cartilage engineering
  • biomaterials
  • regenerative
  • scaffold
  • biomaterial and tissue/cell interactions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 3143 KiB  
Article
Nuclear Factor-κB Decoy Oligodeoxynucleotide Attenuates Cartilage Resorption In Vitro
by Hitoshi Nemoto, Daisuke Sakai, Deborah Watson and Koichi Masuda
Bioengineering 2024, 11(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11010046 - 1 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1429
Abstract
Background: Cartilage harvest and transplantation is a common surgery using costal, auricular, and septal cartilage for craniofacial reconstruction. However, absorption and warping of the cartilage grafts can occur due to inflammatory factors associated with wound healing. Transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is activated [...] Read more.
Background: Cartilage harvest and transplantation is a common surgery using costal, auricular, and septal cartilage for craniofacial reconstruction. However, absorption and warping of the cartilage grafts can occur due to inflammatory factors associated with wound healing. Transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is activated by the various stimulation such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), and plays a central role in the transactivation of this inflammatory cytokine gene. Inhibition of NF-κB may have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of an NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (Decoy) as a chondroprotective agent. Materials and Methods: Safe and efficacious concentrations of Decoy were assessed using rabbit nasal septal chondrocytes (rNSChs) and assays for cytotoxicity, proteoglycan (PG) synthesis, and PG turnover were carried out. The efficacious concentration of Decoy determined from the rNSChs was then applied to human nasal septal cartilage (hNSC) in vitro and analyzed for PG turnover, the levels of inflammatory markers, and catabolic enzymes in explant-conditioned culture medium. Results: Over the range of Decoy conditions and concentrations, no inhibition of PG synthesis or cytotoxicity was observed. Decoy at 10 μM effectively inhibited PG degradation in the hNSC explant, prolonging PG half-life by 63% and decreasing matrix metalloprotease 3 (MMP-3) by 70.7% (p = 0.027). Conclusions: Decoy may be considered a novel chondroprotective therapeutic agent in cartilage transplantation due to its ability to inhibit cartilage degradation due to inflammation cytokines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Bone and Cartilage Engineering Application)
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16 pages, 3353 KiB  
Article
Guar-Based Injectable Hydrogel for Drug Delivery and In Vitro Bone Cell Growth
by Humendra Poudel, Ambar B. RanguMagar, Pooja Singh, Adeolu Oluremi, Nawab Ali, Fumiya Watanabe, Joseph Batta-Mpouma, Jin Woo Kim, Ahona Ghosh and Anindya Ghosh
Bioengineering 2023, 10(9), 1088; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10091088 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2008
Abstract
Injectable hydrogels offer numerous advantages in various areas, which include tissue engineering and drug delivery because of their unique properties such as tunability, excellent carrier properties, and biocompatibility. These hydrogels can be administered with minimal invasiveness. In this study, we synthesized an injectable [...] Read more.
Injectable hydrogels offer numerous advantages in various areas, which include tissue engineering and drug delivery because of their unique properties such as tunability, excellent carrier properties, and biocompatibility. These hydrogels can be administered with minimal invasiveness. In this study, we synthesized an injectable hydrogel by rehydrating lyophilized mixtures of guar adamantane (Guar-ADI) and poly-β-cyclodextrin (p-βCD) in a solution of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) maintained at pH 7.4. The hydrogel was formed via host-guest interaction between modified guar (Guar-ADI), obtained by reacting guar gum with 1-adamantyl isocyanate (ADI) and p-βCD. Comprehensive characterization of all synthesized materials, including the hydrogel, was performed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and rheology. The in vitro drug release study demonstrated the hydrogel’s efficacy in controlled drug delivery, exemplified by the release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anastrozole, both of which followed first-order kinetics. Furthermore, the hydrogel displayed excellent biocompatibility and served as an ideal scaffold for promoting the growth of mouse osteoblastic MC3T3 cells as evidenced by the in vitro biocompatibility study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Bone and Cartilage Engineering Application)
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17 pages, 6400 KiB  
Article
Small-Molecule Loaded Biomimetic Biphasic Scaffold for Osteochondral Regeneration: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study
by Chih-Hsiang Fang, Yi-Wen Lin, Chung-Kai Sun and Jui-Sheng Sun
Bioengineering 2023, 10(7), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10070847 - 17 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1474
Abstract
Osteoarthritis is a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder in the elderly, which leads to high rates of morbidity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising approach to promote tissue regeneration in the absence of effective long-term treatments. Small molecules are relatively inexpensive and can selectively [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis is a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder in the elderly, which leads to high rates of morbidity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising approach to promote tissue regeneration in the absence of effective long-term treatments. Small molecules are relatively inexpensive and can selectively alter stem cell behavior during their differentiation, making them an attractive option for clinical applications. In this study, we developed an extracellular matrix (ECM)-based biphasic scaffold (BPS) loaded with two small-molecule drugs, kartogenin (KGN) and metformin (MET). This cell-free biomimetic biphasic scaffold consists of a bone (gelatin/hydroxyapatite scaffold embedded with metformin [GHSM]) and cartilage (nano-gelatin fiber embedded with kartogenin [NGFK]) layer designed to stimulate osteochondral regeneration. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-based biomimetic scaffolds can promote native cell recruitment, infiltration, and differentiation even in the absence of additional growth factors. The biphasic scaffold (BPS) showed excellent biocompatibility in vitro, with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) adhering, proliferating, and differentiated on the biomimetic biphasic scaffolds (GHSM and NGFK layers). The biphasic scaffolds upregulated both osteogenic and chondrogenic gene expression, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), osteo- and chondrogenic biomarker, and relative mRNA gene expression. In an in vivo rat model, histo-morphological staining showed effective regeneration of osteochondral defects. This novel BPS has the potential to enhance both subchondral bone repair and cartilage regeneration, demonstrating excellent effects on cell homing and the recruitment of endogenous stem cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Bone and Cartilage Engineering Application)
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