Chronic Kidney Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment, Volume II

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1092

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan
Interests: chronic kidney disease; kidney bioengineering; proteinuria; albuminuria; hematuria; glomerular filtration rate; end-stage renal disease; kidney replacement therapy; dialysis; hemodialysis; peritoneal dialysis; kidney transplantation
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Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114201, Taiwan
Interests: mHealth; wearable device; personal health record; eGFR correction; SNPs; GWAS; gene annotation; gene expression profile; natural language processing; artificial intelligence; biomedical informatics; biostatistics; epidemiology; public health
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School of Nursing, College of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan 333323, Taiwan
Interests: pediatrics nursing; pediatrics case management; chronic child care, e.g., asthma; diabetes type I; mHealth; health informatics; telematics; healthcare resource utilization
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Department of Healthcare Administration and Medical Informatics, College of Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan
Interests: health informatics; telematics; healthcare resource utilization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m², or presence of one or more markers of kidney damage (including albuminuria, proteinuria, hematuria, urine sediment abnormalities, electrolyte abnormalities due to tubular disorders, abnormalities on histology, structural abnormalities detected by imaging, or history of kidney transplantation), and at least 3 months of duration. CKD could arise from many different disease pathways that deteriorate renal function irreversibly over months or years, while diabetes mellitus and hypertension are the main causes of CKD worldwide.

Treatment strategies of CKD patients usually contain managements of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, avoiding nephrotoxins, adjustment in drug dosing, reducing risk of cardiovascular disease, diet adjustment, and treating complications. When GFR is less than 15 mL/min per 1.73m², the patient has reached end stage renal disease (ESRD). The kidneys are no longer able to cope with waste and fluid clearance on their own. Options for patients with ESRD are kidney replacement therapy (dialysis or kidney transplantation), or conservative care, as known as palliation or non-dialytic care.

The second edition of this Special Issue, "Chronic Kidney Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment", is dedicated to original papers, brief reports, or reviews that provide further understanding or novel opinions on diagnosis and treatment for CKD. For scholars, traditional cell culture models may be not adequate for studying the functional intricacies of the kidney. Recent experiments have offered improvements for understanding these systems, including organoid modeling, 3D bioprinting, decellularization, microfluidics, and other potential applications of kidney bioengineering. We look forward to your valued research to make this Special Issue a reference resource.

Dr. Po-Jen Hsiao
Prof. Dr. Chi-Ming Chu
Prof. Dr. Chi-Wen Chang
Prof. Dr. Hao-Yun Kao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • kidney bioengineering
  • chronic kidney disease (CKD)
  • glomerular filtration rate (GFR)
  • end-stage renal disease (ESRD)
  • kidney injury
  • nephrotoxins
  • kidney replacement therapy
  • kidney transplantation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

27 pages, 447 KiB  
Article
Biomedical Evaluation of Early Chronic Kidney Disease in the Air Force: Building a Predictive Model from the Taiwan Military Health Service
by Po-Jen Hsiao, Ruei-Lin Wang, Fu-Kang Hu, Fu-Ru Tsai, Chih-Chien Chiu, Wen-Fang Chiang, Kun-Lin Wu, Yuan-Kuei Li, Jenq-Shyong Chan, Chi-Ming Chu and Chi-Wen Chang
Bioengineering 2024, 11(3), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11030231 - 28 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most common diseases worldwide. The increasing prevalence and incidence of CKD have contributed to the critical problem of high medical costs. Due to stressful environments, aircrew members may have a high risk of renal [...] Read more.
Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most common diseases worldwide. The increasing prevalence and incidence of CKD have contributed to the critical problem of high medical costs. Due to stressful environments, aircrew members may have a high risk of renal dysfunction. A better strategy to prevent CKD progression in Air Force personnel would be to diagnosis CKD at an early stage. Since few studies have been conducted in Taiwan to examine the long-term trends in early CKD in Air Force aircrew members, this study is highly important. We investigated the prevalence of CKD and established a predictive model of disease variation among aircrew members. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we included all subjects who had received physical examinations at a military hospital from 2004 to 2010 and who could be tracked for four years. The Abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Formula (aMDRD) was used to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and was combined with the National Kidney Foundation/ Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-K/DOQI) to identify CKD patients. Results: A total of 212 aircrew members were assessed. The results showed that the prevalence of CKD was 3.8%, 9.4%, 9.0%, and 9.4% in each of the four years. According to the logistic regression analysis, abnormal urobilinogen levels, ketones, and white blood cell (WBC) counts in urine and a positive urine occult blood test increased the risk of CKD. A positive urine occult blood test can be used to predict the future risk of CKD. Moreover, the generalized estimating equation (GEE) model showed that a greater risk of CKD with increased examination time, age and seniority had a negative effect. In conclusion, abnormal urobilinogen levels, ketones, and urine WBC counts in urine as well as a positive urine occult blood test might serve as independent predictors for CKD. Conclusion: In the future, we can focus not only on annual physical examinations but also on simple and accurate examinations, such as urine occult blood testing, to determine the risk of CKD and prevent its progression in our aircrew members. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Kidney Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment, Volume II)
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