Assessment and Intervention for Mental Health in Teenagers and Young Adults

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Child and Adolescent Psychiatry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1521

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Nursing, China Medical University, Taichung 406040, Taiwan
Interests: mental health; psychiatric nursing; health promotion; anxiety; physical activity; dementia; screening; at-risk mental state

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue delves into the intricate interplay of psychological symptoms, emphasizing the significance of recognizing prodromal symptoms and the imperative nature of early treatment for teenager and young adults or individuals with at-risk mental state. This Special Issue serves as a multidimensional exploration of mental health, encompassing diverse aspects from prodromal symptoms to early treatment and health promotion. Additionally, it places a strong emphasis on health promotion initiatives tailored to mitigating the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms. Through the lens of preventive strategies and early treatment, the included studies explore novel avenues for enhancing mental health on a societal level, promoting resilience and fostering a holistic approach to well-being. In conclusion, this issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of psychological and prodromal symptoms to bridge the gap between early signs and effective intervention strategies and foster a proactive paradigm in mental healthcare that underscores the importance of early treatment.

Prof. Dr. Wei-Fen Ma
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • insomnia
  • prodromal symptoms
  • ultra-high risk
  • at-risk mental state
  • health promotion
  • mental health
  • psychiatric symptoms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 263 KiB  
Article
The Comparison of Lifestyles, Mental Risks, and Physical Indices among Individuals with Ultra-High Risk of Psychosis, Patients with Schizophrenia, and the General Public
by Ching-Lun Tsai, Chi-Ming Chu, Hsien-Yuan Lane, Shiah-Lian Chen, Cheng-Hao Tu and Wei-Fen Ma
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14050395 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 451
Abstract
(1) Background: Early interventions may effectively reduce the risk of mental disorders in individuals with ultra-high risk. Specifying the health needs of individuals with ultra-high risk is crucial before the implementation of successful early intervention. This study aimed to explore the differences in [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Early interventions may effectively reduce the risk of mental disorders in individuals with ultra-high risk. Specifying the health needs of individuals with ultra-high risk is crucial before the implementation of successful early intervention. This study aimed to explore the differences in lifestyles, mental risks, and physical indices among individuals with ultra-high risk, patients with schizophrenia, and healthy subjects. (2) Methods: A cross-section design applying seven questionnaires with physical examinations for 144 participants aged 13–45 years old was conducted in this study. The questionnaires included one about personal data, four on mental risks, and two for lifestyles. (3) Results: The individuals with ultra-high risk scored similarly in many dimensions as the patients with schizophrenia, but they displayed lower positive symptoms, lower negative symptoms, lower prodromal symptoms, higher interpersonal deficits, lower nutrition intake, and higher levels of exercise than the patients with schizophrenia. Female individuals with ultra-high risk had lower self-esteem, higher positive symptoms, lower nutrition intake, and higher exercise levels than male ones. (4) Conclusions: The study pinpointed specific health needs with interpersonal deficits, nutrition intake, and physical activity for the individuals with ultra-high risk. Future interventions targeted on improving social function, dietary pattern, and exercise will be beneficial. Full article
20 pages, 1995 KiB  
Article
How Coparenting Is Linked to Depression among Chinese Young Girls and Boys: Evidence from a Network Analysis
by Demao Zhao, Xin Gao, Wei Chen and Quan Zhou
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040297 - 4 Apr 2024
Viewed by 726
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the relationship between parental coparenting and depression among Chinese young adolescents and potential gender differences via network analysis. Thus, 793 fourth-grade students (girls: 281 (35.40%), Mage = 9.99 years, SD = 0.59 years) were recruited from three primary [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore the relationship between parental coparenting and depression among Chinese young adolescents and potential gender differences via network analysis. Thus, 793 fourth-grade students (girls: 281 (35.40%), Mage = 9.99 years, SD = 0.59 years) were recruited from three primary schools in Northern China. The young adolescents rated their depression and perceived paternal and maternal coparenting. Network analysis was used to detect the central nodes and bridge mechanisms among coparenting and depressive components. The results indicated that paternal and maternal consistency as well as maternal conflict were the most central components in the coparenting–depression network. Paternal consistency, maternal conflict and paternal disparagement in coparenting, as well as somatic complaints and positive affect in adolescents’ depression, exhibited high bridge strengths, suggesting those constructs served as vital bridges to connect the two subnetworks. Moreover, paternal consistency showed a higher bridge strength in the boys’ network than the girls’ one, whereas the edge linking adolescents’ positive affect to paternal disparagement and integrity was stronger in the girls’ network. This study contributes to the understanding of associations between parental coparenting and young adolescents’ depression and offered insights into targeted interventions for early adolescent depression by enhancing parental coparenting. Full article
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