Burnout, Mental Health and Work-Family Interface in Today’s Workplaces

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 3997

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: occupational well-being; psycho-social hazards; workplace incivility; workplace aggression; job burnout

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Science, Alma Mater Studiorum Bologna, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna, Italy
Interests: technology acceptance; mHealth; stress management interventions; mental health promotion; work inclusion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The prevalence of mental health illnesses and burnout have grown exponentially, becoming worldwide problems. These conditions burden individuals’ well-being and work functioning, undermining organizations’ productivity. The recognition of burnout syndrome as an occupational phenomenon has made it even more evident that unhealthy working conditions threaten workers’ mental health. In today’s workplaces, the uncertainty engendered by the pandemic-related socio-economic crisis has increased workers’ exposure to traditional and emerging risk factors. Among these, the work–life imbalance has become one of the major challenges of modern-day work. Thus, there is an urgent need for more research capable of informing the design of mental health promotion and burnout prevention interventions and cultivating family-friendly workplaces. This Special Issue plans to collect manuscripts that offer insights into how and when emerging risk factors can be sources of mental health problems, burnout, and work–life imbalance and which factors are protective against these conditions. 

Potential article topics include, but are not limited to:

  • mediators/moderators in the relationship between emerging psycho-social hazards (e.g., job insecurity, cyber-incivility) and workers’ occupational well-being
  • burnout and related variables (e.g., interpersonal strain)
  • application of pre-existing theoretical models to understanding of emerging psycho-social hazards’ impact
  • mental health at work
  • protective factors
  • work-life interface
  • how to create healthy workplaces

We especially welcome quantitative papers combining advanced methodology and a high academic standards together with a practical focus on how to promote mental health, prevent burnout and facilitate a good work–life balance in organizational settings. 

Dr. Valentina Sommovigo
Dr. Giulia Paganin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • occupational well-being
  • traditional and emerging psycho-social hazards
  • job burnout
  • mental health at work
  • work–life interface

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 1040 KiB  
Article
How Is Job Insecurity Related to Workers’ Work–Family Conflict during the Pandemic? The Mediating Role of Working Excessively and Techno-Overload
by Georgia Libera Finstad, Chiara Bernuzzi, Ilaria Setti, Elena Fiabane, Gabriele Giorgi and Valentina Sommovigo
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040288 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 526
Abstract
The current labor market is characterized by drastic changes linked to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and post-COVID-19 transformations, which have decreased job security and job stability. As a result, the feeling of losing one’s job has become even more [...] Read more.
The current labor market is characterized by drastic changes linked to the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and post-COVID-19 transformations, which have decreased job security and job stability. As a result, the feeling of losing one’s job has become even more common among European workers. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether and how job insecurity would be related to work–family conflict during the pandemic. Online self-report questionnaires assessing job insecurity, working excessively, techno-overload, and work-to-family conflict were completed by 266 workers from Italy. Descriptive analyses, confirmatory factor analyses, and structural equation mediation models were conducted. Job insecurity was positively associated with work-to-family conflict, both directly and indirectly, as mediated by techno-overload and a tendency to work excessively. This study advances the literature, as it is the first to identify techno-overload and working excessively as parallel psychological mechanisms linking job insecurity to work–family conflict among Italian workers during the pandemic. Workers could benefit from technological workload monitoring programs, techno effectiveness, and time management training programs. Companies could also consider implementing family-friendly and digital disconnection practices. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 807 KiB  
Article
Examining the Antecedents of Novice STEM Teachers’ Job Satisfaction: The Roles of Personality Traits, Perceived Social Support, and Work Engagement
by Zhaochun Wang, Haozhe Jiang, Wu Jin, Jin Jiang, Jiahong Liu, Jia Guan, Yangxi Liu and Enlin Bin
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14030214 - 06 Mar 2024
Viewed by 878
Abstract
It is reported that teachers’ satisfaction levels are lower and stress levels are higher than other professional groups in many countries. This is especially true for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers. Considering job satisfaction has a direct impact on turnover intention, [...] Read more.
It is reported that teachers’ satisfaction levels are lower and stress levels are higher than other professional groups in many countries. This is especially true for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers. Considering job satisfaction has a direct impact on turnover intention, low satisfaction levels have led to high turnover rates and thus exacerbated the shortages of STEM teachers. Hence, there is an urgent need to explore the antecedents of novice STEM teachers’ job satisfaction. This study proposes a new model to show how novice STEM teachers’ personality traits and perceived social support influence their job satisfaction. A total of 2592 novice STEM teachers in eighteen randomly selected high schools in China were recruited. Data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling approach. The results illustrated that most novice STEM teachers had low levels of job satisfaction. Novice STEM teachers’ personality traits could directly and indirectly impact their job satisfaction. Meanwhile, novice STEM teachers’ job satisfaction was also directly influenced by work engagement and indirectly influenced by their perceived social support. Our findings theoretically contribute to the understanding of the determinants of STEM teachers’ job satisfaction and have important practical implications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1033 KiB  
Article
Avoiding Academic Burnout: Academic Factors That Enhance University Student Engagement
by Salvador Reyes-de-Cózar, Alba Merino-Cajaraville and María Rosa Salguero-Pazos
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 989; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13120989 - 30 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1923
Abstract
Burnout is one of the major problems in higher education and is linked to a decline in students’ academic performance and achievement. Burnout, when prolonged over time and added to stress and high workloads, promotes the intention to drop out of studies, which [...] Read more.
Burnout is one of the major problems in higher education and is linked to a decline in students’ academic performance and achievement. Burnout, when prolonged over time and added to stress and high workloads, promotes the intention to drop out of studies, which translates into negative consequences for individuals and groups. Academic engagement is proposed as an effective alternative to offer solutions to improve the quality of education and counteract current negative trends. This study is based on a correlational–descriptive research design. It aimed to find out to what extent students feel engaged in their university studies and to identify and analyze possible correlations between engagement and specific classroom variables. To this end, a sample of 764 college students was studied. The result showed that students feel connected to and interested in their studies and that the area of knowledge impacts student engagement. They also indicate how learning strategies used in the classroom positively impact academic engagement. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop