Sodium-Ion Battery: Latest Advances and Prospects

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105). This special issue belongs to the section "Battery Mechanisms and Fundamental Electrochemistry Aspects".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2022) | Viewed by 11992

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: novel battery materials and technologies; Na-ion; Li-ion; Mg-ion; cell manufacturing; cell design; composite electrode formulation; electrochemical test methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: sodium-ion batteries; manufacturing; electrolyte additives; formation

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: sodium-ion Batteries; potassium ion batteries; electrochemical testing; formation and conditioning; battery manufacturing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on sodium-ion batteries is focused on new sodium-ion battery technologies. Can we boost the performance and cost properties of a sodium-ion battery by pushing the boundaries of the materials, manufacturing processes, and device manufacture?

In order to establish sodium ion as a credible technology, it must be either a suitable alternative to current lithium ion technologies or have a market of its own. Can sodium ion provide technology which is suitable for new applications?

This edition discusses the suitability of sodium ion batteries for applications and pushes the current performance limits of device performance.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Novel sodium-ion materials, positive, negative, and electrolytes;
  • Electrode design;
  • Electrochemical test method;
  • NIB cell design;
  • Safety failure analysis;
  • Performance lifetime and degradation studies.

Prof. Dr. Emma Kendrick
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • novel battery materials and technologies
  • Na-ion
  • Li-ion
  • Mg-ion
  • cell manufacturing
  • cell design
  • composite electrode formulation
  • electrochemical test methods
  • NIB
  • SIB
  • electrode
  • electrolyte
  • cathode

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 3564 KiB  
Article
Metal Substitution versus Oxygen-Storage Modifier to Regulate the Oxygen Redox Reactions in Sodium-Deficient Three-Layered Oxides
by Mariya Kalapsazova, Rositsa Kukeva, Ekaterina Zhecheva and Radostina Stoyanova
Batteries 2022, 8(6), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries8060056 - 15 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2318
Abstract
Sodium-deficient nickel-manganese oxides with three-layered stacking exhibit the unique property of dual nickel-oxygen redox activity, which allows them to achieve enormous specific capacity. The challenge is how to stabilize the oxygen redox activity during cycling. This study demonstrates that oxygen redox activity of [...] Read more.
Sodium-deficient nickel-manganese oxides with three-layered stacking exhibit the unique property of dual nickel-oxygen redox activity, which allows them to achieve enormous specific capacity. The challenge is how to stabilize the oxygen redox activity during cycling. This study demonstrates that oxygen redox activity of P3-Na2/3Ni1/2Mn1/2O2 during both Na+ and Li+ intercalation can be regulated by the design of oxide architecture that includes target metal substituents (such as Mg2+ and Ti4+) and oxygen storage modifiers (such as CeO2). Although the substitution for nickel with Ti4+ amplifies the oxygen redox activity and intensifies the interaction of oxides with NaPF6- and LiPF6-based electrolytes, the Mg2+ substituents influence mainly the nickel redox activity and suppress the deposition of electrolyte decomposed products (such as MnF2). The CeO2-modifier has a much stronger effect on the oxygen redox activity than that of metal substituents; thus, the highest specific capacity is attained. In addition, the CeO2-modifier tunes the electrode–electrode interaction by eliminating the deposition of MnF2. As a result, the Mg-substituted oxide modified with CeO2 displays high capacity, excellent cycling stability and exceptional rate capability when used as cathode in Na-ion cell, while in Li-ion cell, the best performance is achieved for Ti-substituted oxide modified by CeO2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sodium-Ion Battery: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 36162 KiB  
Article
Reduced Graphene Oxide Aerogels with Functionalization-Mediated Disordered Stacking for Sodium-Ion Batteries
by Jaehyeung Park, Jaswinder Sharma, Charl J. Jafta, Lilin He, Harry M. Meyer III, Jianlin Li, Jong K. Keum, Ngoc A. Nguyen and Georgios Polizos
Batteries 2022, 8(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries8020012 - 1 Feb 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3557
Abstract
Surface modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) aerogels were synthesized using the hydrothermal method. Ethylene diamine (EDA) and α-cyclodextrin (CD) were used to functionalize the surface of the graphene oxide layers. The oxygen reduction and surface modification occurred in-situ during the hydrothermal self-assembly process. [...] Read more.
Surface modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) aerogels were synthesized using the hydrothermal method. Ethylene diamine (EDA) and α-cyclodextrin (CD) were used to functionalize the surface of the graphene oxide layers. The oxygen reduction and surface modification occurred in-situ during the hydrothermal self-assembly process. The chemical functionality and structure of the resulting ethylene diamine modified (rGO-EDA) and cyclodextrin modified (rGO-CD) aerogels as well as of the pristine unmodified rGO aerogel were studied using XPS, SEM, XRD, and SANS techniques. The overall surface composition showed a significant decrease in the oxygen content for all synthesized aerogels. The surface modified aerogels were characterized by a disordered stacking of the assembled rGO layers. The surface functionalities resulted in a broad distribution of the interlayer spacing and introduced structural heterogeneities. Such disordered structures can enable a better adsorption mechanism of the sodium ions. Coin cells based on the synthesized aerogels and sodium metal were assembled and tested at several charge and discharge rates. The correlation between the surface functionality of the rGO, the induced structural heterogeneities due to the disordered stacking, and the electrochemical performance of sodium-ion batteries were investigated. Operando XRD measurements were carried out during the battery cycling to investigate the adsorption or intercalation nature of the sodiation mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sodium-Ion Battery: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 3427 KiB  
Article
Titanium Activation in Prussian Blue Based Electrodes for Na-ion Batteries: A Synthesis and Electrochemical Study
by Min Li, Angelo Mullaliu, Stefano Passerini and Marco Giorgetti
Batteries 2021, 7(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries7010005 - 7 Jan 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3906
Abstract
Sodium titanium hexacyanoferrate (TiHCF, Na0.86Ti0.73[Fe(CN)6]·3H2O) is synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method in this study. Its crystal structure, chemical composition, and geometric/electronic structural information are investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy [...] Read more.
Sodium titanium hexacyanoferrate (TiHCF, Na0.86Ti0.73[Fe(CN)6]·3H2O) is synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method in this study. Its crystal structure, chemical composition, and geometric/electronic structural information are investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The electroactivity of TiHCF as a host for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries is studied in organic electrolytes. The results demonstrate that TiHCF is a good positive electrode material for both Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. Surprisingly, however, the material shows better electrochemical performance as a Na-ion host, offering a capacity of 74 mAh g−1 at C/20 and a 94.5% retention after 50 cycles. This is due to the activation of Ti towards the redox reaction, making TiHCF a good candidate electrode material for Na-ion batteries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sodium-Ion Battery: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop