Zinc-Based Batteries: Recent Progress and Future Perspectives

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2024) | Viewed by 2708

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B9, Canada
Interests: batteries; MXene; electrodeposition; energy storage materials; electrochemistry

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: electrochemical energy storage; materials science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
State Key Laboratory of Bio-Fibers and Eco-Textiles, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071, China
Interests: electrochemical energy storage; materials science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rechargeable zinc-based batteries are attractive candidates for energy storage systems owning to their safety, low cost, etc. However, the hazards caused by uncontrollable zinc dendrite growth and side reactions hinder their practical application. Therefore, fundamental investigations, advances and future perspectives on zinc-based batteries are necessary for improving the practical applications.

In this Special Issue, we will focus on innovative design strategies, performance improvements, mechanism analyses and novel electrode materials for zinc-based batteries. We would like to invite original research articles and comprehensive reviews, providing innovative research work and deep insights into zinc-based batteries. These research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The design of highly stable aqueous Zn-batteries;
  • The design of highly stable solid-state Zn-batteries;
  • Advanced characterizations;
  • Mechanism analysis,
  • Zn-air batteries;
  • Zinc-based flow battery;
  • Hybrid zinc-ion batteries;
  • Dendrites formation, growth, and prevention.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Yuan Tian
Dr. Yongling An
Dr. Liwen Tan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zinc-based batteries
  • aqueous Zn battery
  • solid-state Zn battery
  • electrodes
  • electrolytes
  • design strategies
  • dendrites
  • mechanism
  • advanced technique
  • reviews
  • perspective

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 4916 KiB  
Article
Graphite Felt as an Innovative Electrode Material for Alkaline Water Electrolysis and Zinc–Air Batteries
by Yejin Lee, Seung-hee Park and Sung Hoon Ahn
Batteries 2024, 10(2), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/batteries10020049 - 28 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2091
Abstract
Recent advancements in energy conversion and storage systems have placed a spotlight on the role of multi-functional electrodes employing conductive substrates. These substrates, however, often face obstacles due to intricate and expensive production methods, as well as limitations in thickness. This research introduces [...] Read more.
Recent advancements in energy conversion and storage systems have placed a spotlight on the role of multi-functional electrodes employing conductive substrates. These substrates, however, often face obstacles due to intricate and expensive production methods, as well as limitations in thickness. This research introduces a novel, economical approach using graphite felt as a versatile electrode. A method to enhance the typically low conductivity of graphite felt was devised, incorporating interfacial chemical tuning and the electrodeposition of a highly conductive nickel layer. This technique facilitates the integration of diverse transition metal-based active sites, aiming to refine the catalytic activity for specific electrochemical reactions. A key finding is that a combination of a nickel-rich cathode and an iron-rich anode can effectively optimize alkaline water electrolysis for hydrogen production at the ampere scale. Furthermore, the addition of sulfur improves the bi-functional oxygen-related redox reactions, rendering it ideal for air cathodes in solid-state zinc–air batteries. The assembled battery exhibits impressive performance, including a peak power density of 62.9 mW cm−2, a minimal voltage gap in discharge–charge polarization, and a lifecycle surpassing 70 h. This advancement in electrode technology signifies a significant leap in energy storage and conversion, offering a sustainable and efficient solution for future energy systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zinc-Based Batteries: Recent Progress and Future Perspectives)
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