Digital Technologies in Education for Mathematics and Statistics

A special issue of Axioms (ISSN 2075-1680).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 2531

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dpto. de Matemáticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: bayesian statistics; extreme value theory; applied statistics; ICT
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dpto. de Matemáticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain
Interests: bayesian statistics; extreme value theory; applied statistics; ICT
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The integration of digital technology confronts researchers, teachers, students, and politicians for different reasons. As countries around the world move to integrate digital technologies into their classrooms, new pathways are emerging that enrich teachers’ digital skills for the development of knowledge and educational practices in the classroom. The use of information and communications technology (ICT) tools in higher education is essential, especially for STEM disciplines. The achievement of these tools’ full potential is usually a determinant factor for their success in the classroom.

Focused on higher education in mathematics and statistics, this Special Issue offers the opportunity to bring together international researchers and teachers who employ digital technology to improve the teaching and learning process.

It may include contributions addressing theoretical, methodological, and practical challenges; software reviews; application development; and hands-on experiences.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Useful computer programs for mathematical teachers and students;
  • Mathematical and statistical software;
  • ICT for higher education;
  • Innovation, Education and ICT in the university setting;
  • Design, implementation and assessment of innovative technologies in education;
  • E-learning.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Eva T. López Sanjuán
Prof. Dr. María Isabel Parra Arévalo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Axioms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • statistics
  • mathematics education
  • ICT
  • digital technology
  • software

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

24 pages, 1460 KiB  
Article
Didactic–Mathematical–Computational Knowledge of Future Teachers When Solving and Designing Robotics Problems
by Gemma Sala-Sebastià, Adriana Breda, María José Seckel, Danyal Farsani and Àngel Alsina
Axioms 2023, 12(2), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/axioms12020119 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1558
Abstract
The social, scientific and technological development of recent years has encouraged the incorporation of computational thinking in the school curriculum of various countries progressively, starting from early childhood education. This research aims to characterize future kindergarten teachers’ traits of didactic-mathematical and computational knowledge [...] Read more.
The social, scientific and technological development of recent years has encouraged the incorporation of computational thinking in the school curriculum of various countries progressively, starting from early childhood education. This research aims to characterize future kindergarten teachers’ traits of didactic-mathematical and computational knowledge presented when solving and posing robotics problems. Firstly, aspects of the mathematical and computational knowledge of the participants (97 students of the subject of Didactics of Mathematics of the Degree in Early Childhood Education at a Spanish university) were identified when they solved problems as users of the Blue-Bot didactic robot. Secondly, we analyzed their justifications for reflecting on the design of robotics problems. The results indicate that future teachers present characteristics of didactic-mathematical knowledge when solving and designing robotics problems, although errors and ambiguities are evident, especially in the procedures and representations of the programming. These shortcomings significantly influence the didactic suitability of the robotics problems they design. From a future perspective, in the training of future teachers, it is considered relevant to incorporate didactic-mathematical and computational knowledge that allows them to develop logical, spatial and computational thinking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies in Education for Mathematics and Statistics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop