Cognitive Decline within the Audiology Scope of Practice

A special issue of Audiology Research (ISSN 2039-4349).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2023) | Viewed by 4010

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA
Interests: aging; auditory processing; auditory training; cortical auditory evoked potentials; relationship between hearing and cognition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent literature suggests a relationship between pure-tone hearing and cognitive function as well as between some measures of auditory processing and cognitive function. Emerging data suggests other measures that fall within the audiology scope of practice may serve as useful early indicators of cognitive impairment as well. However, the clinical utility of these measures is currently unknown and guidance for practicing audiologists is minimal. As cognitive impairment is currently the most devastating and feared condition that older adults face and the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias will cost the US $321 billion in 2022, it is critical for older adults at risk to seek treatment early.  Unfortunately, most older adults only seek help when symptoms are very advanced and difficult to treat. Our referral process needs to improve.

This special issue is devoted to exploring the potential early indicators of cognitive impairment that fall within the audiology scope of practice with a goal of improving the referral process.

Prof. Dr. Jennifer Lister
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • cognition
  • dementia
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • cognitive impairment
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • scope of practice
  • hearing loss
  • vestibular function
  • auditory processing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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18 pages, 1847 KiB  
Article
Neuropsychological Functions and Audiological Findings in Elderly Cochlear Implant Users: The Role of Attention in Postoperative Performance
by Ilaria Giallini, Bianca Maria Serena Inguscio, Maria Nicastri, Ginevra Portanova, Andrea Ciofalo, Annalisa Pace, Antonio Greco, Hilal Dincer D’Alessandro and Patrizia Mancini
Audiol. Res. 2023, 13(2), 236-253; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13020022 - 27 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1916
Abstract
Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate in a group of elderly CI users working memory and attention, conventionally considered as predictors of better CI performance and to try to disentangle the effects of these cognitive domains on speech perception, finding potential markers [...] Read more.
Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate in a group of elderly CI users working memory and attention, conventionally considered as predictors of better CI performance and to try to disentangle the effects of these cognitive domains on speech perception, finding potential markers of cognitive decline related to audiometric findings. Methods Thirty postlingually deafened CI users aged >60 underwent an audiological evaluation followed by a cognitive assessment of attention and verbal working memory. A correlation analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between cognitive variables while a simple regression investigated the relationships between cognitive and audiological variables. Comparative analysis was performed to compare variables on the basis of subjects’ attention performance. Results: Attention was found to play a significant role in sound field and speech perception. Univariate analysis found a significant difference between poor and high attention performers, while regression analysis showed that attention significantly predicted recognition of words presented at Signal/Noise +10. Further, the high attention performers showed significantly higher scores than low attentional performers for all working memory tasks. Conclusion: Overall findings confirmed that a better cognitive performance may positively contribute to better speech perception outcomes, especially in complex listening situations. WM may play a crucial role in storage and processing of auditory-verbal stimuli and a robust attention may lead to better performance for speech perception in noise. Implementation of cognitive training in auditory rehabilitation of CI users should be investigated in order to improve cognitive and audiological performance in elderly CI users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Decline within the Audiology Scope of Practice)
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13 pages, 258 KiB  
Perspective
An Interprofessional Approach to Aural Rehabilitation for Adults with Hearing Loss and Cognitive Concerns
by Kate Helms Tillery and Aparna Rao
Audiol. Res. 2024, 14(1), 166-178; https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres14010014 - 4 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Individuals with hearing loss are at risk for cognitive decline. The traditional approach to audiological care does not typically involve a team approach that addresses cognitive concerns. While cognitive screening is within the scope of practice in audiology, audiologists are not typically trained [...] Read more.
Individuals with hearing loss are at risk for cognitive decline. The traditional approach to audiological care does not typically involve a team approach that addresses cognitive concerns. While cognitive screening is within the scope of practice in audiology, audiologists are not typically trained in interpreting screening results or providing rehabilitation that supports cognitive health. However, as growing evidence shows that hearing loss is tied to cognitive decline, a team approach is required to support whole-person care. Speech–language pathologists, who specialize in optimizing communication, are best situated to collaborate with audiologists to provide holistic aural rehabilitation. Audiologists and speech–language pathologists who partner to support a client’s communication skills and social relationships play an important role in the life of an individual with hearing loss. In this perspective, we describe relevant background information about hearing loss and cognition and present an interprofessional approach to aural rehabilitation for adults with hearing loss who have cognitive concerns. We also discuss implications for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Decline within the Audiology Scope of Practice)
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