Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Strategies for Sustainable Viticulture and Wine Industry

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2022) | Viewed by 1795

Special Issue Editors

Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apt. 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: abiotic stress; acclimation; adaptation strategies; plant physiology; stress responses; viticulture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Agronomy, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: grapevine eco-physiology; (a)biotic stress tolerance; biostimulants; particle film technologies; viticulture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apt. 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: abiotic stress; acclimation; adaptation strategies; grapevine; plant physiology; stress responses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The effects of climate change pose a severe challenge to viticulture and the winemaking sector worldwide. The projected changes of regular weather patterns in terms of intensity and periodicity over the growing cycle are already increasing the frequency of extreme weather events (e.g., heat waves, floods, prolonged drought), compromising the sustainability of grapevine growth and production (yield and quality potential). The evolution of viticultural and winemaking techniques has allowed researchers and winegrowers to combine scientific, applied, and cultural knowledge targeted to multiple threats by developing short- (e.g., use of foliar protectants) and long-term (e.g., varietal and clonal selection, rootstock selection) strategies to cope with yield and quality losses. These strategies comprise multiple tools, such as soil and canopy management practices, precision viticulture, and the winemaking process optimization to promote a sustainable balance between grape production, quality, and vine development and physiological performance. In this sense, for this Special Issue of Atmosphere, we welcome submissions of interdisciplinary research concerning the impacts of climate change (abiotic stress factors) and sustainable adaptation strategies for viticulture and wine industry under applied contexts. We intend for articles presented in this Special Issue to be useful for a broad and diverse group of readers.

Prof. Dr. José Manuel Moutinho Pereira
Dr. Lia-Tania Dinis
Dr. Sara Bernardo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant physiology
  • viticulture
  • abiotic stress tolerance
  • climate change
  • yield
  • berry quality
  • plant stress responses
  • primary metabolites
  • secondary metabolites
  • wine quality

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2772 KiB  
Article
The Umbrella Type Canopy Increases Tolerance to Abiotic Stress-Leaf Microenvironment Temperature and Tropospheric Ozone in ‘Chambourcin’
Atmosphere 2022, 13(5), 823; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13050823 - 18 May 2022
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Abstract
This study reports on the effect of the vertical shoot type canopy (VST) and umbrella type canopy (UT) on the fruit region microenvironment, light interception, tropospheric ozone, and berry quality of vertical trellis ‘Chambourcin’. The real-time temperature and humidity fluctuation and the daily [...] Read more.
This study reports on the effect of the vertical shoot type canopy (VST) and umbrella type canopy (UT) on the fruit region microenvironment, light interception, tropospheric ozone, and berry quality of vertical trellis ‘Chambourcin’. The real-time temperature and humidity fluctuation and the daily average temperature of the UT canopy were lower than that of the VST canopy. An extremely high temperature was recorded around the fruit region of the VST canopy. Notably, the UT canopy significantly increased light interception and leaf area index and reduced the damage of atmospheric ozone to the leaves. These phenomena increased the content of soluble solids, anthocyanins, total phenols, flavonoids, and flavanols in the mature fruits of the UT canopy more than in the VST canopy. In conclusion, the UT canopy saves shoot management labor and improves the fruit region’s microenvironment and the content of anthocyanins, total phenols, flavonoids, and flavanols. Full article
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