Joint Disasters of High Temperature and Drought

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 3982

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Arid Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, Lanzhou 730000, China
Interests: abrupt climate change; early warning; extreme events; drought disaster

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy, Split University, Matice Hrvatske str. 15, 21000 Split, Croatia
Interests: hydrology; ecohydrology; river regulation; flood; drought
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Under the background of global warming, joint disasters of high temperature and drought occur frequently, resulting in serious regional disaster events and posing a threat to economic development and human survival. There are many studies on extreme temperatures and drought, and studies based on circulation and external forcing have increased our understanding of these extreme disaster events. However, the research on joint disaster events is still limited. In what state does the persistence of high temperatures transform into drought events, and does long-term drought induce extreme high temperature events? When high temperature and drought occur simultaneously, what is the formation mechanism and what are the prediction and early warning methods?

This Special Issue is expected to arouse people's interest in joint disasters of high temperature and drought events through research on mechanisms, early warning and prediction, and joint disaster prevention and mitigation.

Dr. Pengcheng Yan
Prof. Dr. Ognjen Bonacci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • joint disasters of temperature and drought
  • extreme temperature
  • extreme drought
  • transition of circulation
  • regional disasters
  • extreme temperature/drought and climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1834 KiB  
Communication
El Niño’s Effects on Southern African Agriculture in 2023/24 and Anticipatory Action Strategies to Reduce the Impacts in Zimbabwe
by Hillary Mugiyo, Tamuka Magadzire, Dennis Junior Choruma, Vimbayi Grace Petrova Chimonyo, Rebecca Manzou, Obert Jiri and Tafadzwa Mabhaudhi
Atmosphere 2023, 14(11), 1692; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14111692 - 16 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2617
Abstract
The frequency of El Niño occurrences in southern Africa surpasses the norm, resulting in erratic weather patterns that significantly impact food security, particularly in Zimbabwe. The effects of these weather patterns posit that El Niño occurrences have contributed to the diminished maize yields. [...] Read more.
The frequency of El Niño occurrences in southern Africa surpasses the norm, resulting in erratic weather patterns that significantly impact food security, particularly in Zimbabwe. The effects of these weather patterns posit that El Niño occurrences have contributed to the diminished maize yields. The objective is to give guidelines to policymakers, researchers, and agricultural stakeholders for taking proactive actions to address the immediate and lasting impacts of El Niño and enhance the resilience of the agricultural industry. This brief paper provides prospective strategies for farmers to anticipate and counteract the El Niño-influenced dry season projected for 2023/24 and beyond. The coefficient of determination R2 between yield and ENSO was low; 11 of the 13 El Niño seasons had a negative detrended yield anomaly, indicating the strong association between El Nino’s effects and the reduced maize yields in Zimbabwe. The R2 between the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI) and rainfall (43%) and between rainfall and yield (39%) indirectly affects the association between ONI and yield. To safeguard farmers’ livelihoods and improve their preparedness for droughts in future agricultural seasons, this paper proposes a set of strategic, tactical, and operational decision-making guidelines that the agriculture industry should follow. The importance of equipping farmers with weather and climate information and guidance on drought and heat stress was underscored, encompassing strategies such as planting resilient crop varieties, choosing resilient livestock, and implementing adequate fire safety measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Disasters of High Temperature and Drought)
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22 pages, 5715 KiB  
Article
Meteorological and Hydrological Drought Risks under Future Climate and Land-Use-Change Scenarios in the Yellow River Basin
by Yunyun Li, Yi Huang, Jingjing Fan, Hongxue Zhang, Yanchun Li, Xuemei Wang and Qian Deng
Atmosphere 2023, 14(11), 1599; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14111599 - 26 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
The primary innovation of this study lies in the development of an integrated modeling framework that combines downscaled climate projections, land-use-change simulations, and copula-based risk analysis. This framework allows for the assessment of localized sub-seasonal and seasonal drought hazards under future scenarios. The [...] Read more.
The primary innovation of this study lies in the development of an integrated modeling framework that combines downscaled climate projections, land-use-change simulations, and copula-based risk analysis. This framework allows for the assessment of localized sub-seasonal and seasonal drought hazards under future scenarios. The BCC-CSM1-1 climate model projections from the NASA Earth Exchange Global Daily Downscaled Projections (NEX-GDDP) dataset are utilized to represent the future climate for 2025–2060 under RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. The CA-Markov model is employed to predict future land-use-change distributions. The climate–land use–drought modeling nexus enables the generation of refined spatio-temporal projections of meteorological and hydrological drought risks in the Yellow River Basin (YRB) in the future period of 2025–2060. The results highlight the increased vulnerability of the upper YRB to sub-seasonal meteorological droughts, as well as the heightened sub-seasonal hydrological drought risks in the Loess Plateau. Furthermore, downstream areas experience escalated seasonal hydrological drought exposure due to urbanization. By providing actionable insights into localized future drought patterns, this integrated assessment approach advances preparedness and climate adaptation strategies. The findings of the study enhance our understanding of potential changes in this integral system under the combined pressures of global climate change and land use shifts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Disasters of High Temperature and Drought)
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