Land-Atmosphere Interactions: Research and Development to Advance the Modeling of Hydrometeorological Processes

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land–Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 5107

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental, and Ocean Engineering (CEOE), Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030, USA
Interests: hydrometeorology; remote sensing; water resources
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
National Center of Meteorology, Abu Dhabi P.O. Box 4815, United Arab Emirates
Interests: hydrology; remote sensing; cloud physics, machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The focus of this Special Issue is to advance our understanding of the interactions between land and atmosphere, to better integrate them in weather and climate models, and to enhance the performance of the simulation of hydrometeorological processes.

An accurate modeling of climate and weather conditions requires the use of numerical models that capture, realistically through their schemes and parametrizations, the complex processes at the surface and in the near-surface atmosphere. In addition, these models should account for the interactions between land and atmosphere and the exchange of energy and mass between them. Moreover, these interactions could involve a feedback component that could enhance or reduce the response of the studied processes to the variability of various factors. Therefore, considering land–atmosphere interactions in a modeling approach is crucial to build a robust and reliable model and predict climate accurately.

The complexity of these interactions and the observations of their components have been the challenge to overcome in order to integrate land-atmosphere interactions when modeling weather and climate. The sensing of land and near-surface parameters has relied on in situ observations, as well as ground-based and space-borne sensors.

This Special Issue invites authors interested in studying land–atmosphere interactions to submit their research results. The submitted manuscripts could include local, regional, or global analysis of land–atmosphere interactions using various models and observational platforms. Submissions that include case studies, field campaigns, and/or the use of sensors to characterize land–atmosphere interactions are also welcome. Thorough and comprehensive review manuscripts are also welcome.

Dr. Marouane Temimi
Dr. Youssef Wehbe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land
  • atmosphere
  • modeling
  • observations
  • sensing
  • extreme events
  • hydrometeorology
  • feedback
  • precipitation
  • cloud
  • ice
  • snow
  • cryosphere

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 7012 KiB  
Article
Study of the Possibility of Stimulating Cloud Convection by Solar Radiation Energy Absorbed in an Artificial Aerosol Layer
by Magomet T. Abshaev, Ali M. Abshaev, Andrey A. Aksenov, Julia V. Fisher, Alexander E. Shchelyaev, Abdulla Al Mandous, Youssef Wehbe and Reyad El-Khazali
Atmosphere 2023, 14(1), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14010086 - 31 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2727
Abstract
We consider the possibility of creating artificial clouds similar to Pyro clouds formed in nature over large forest and other fires. It is assumed that the creation of an artificial surface aerosol layer that absorbs solar radiation can lead to the heating of [...] Read more.
We consider the possibility of creating artificial clouds similar to Pyro clouds formed in nature over large forest and other fires. It is assumed that the creation of an artificial surface aerosol layer that absorbs solar radiation can lead to the heating of local air volumes and initiate thermal convection. The possibility of such convection was examined theoretically using the computational fluid dynamics software package suite FlowVision, in which the equations of motion, energy and mass transfer are solved in relative variables. Numerical experiments showed the principal possibility of initiating cloud convection only under some favorable atmospheric conditions (low wind speeds, temperature lapse rate greater than 8–9 °C/km), with an aerosol layer area of at least 5–10 km2 and a duration of its existence (heating) of at least 30 min. To assess the possibility of the practical implementation of this method, eight variants of highly efficient smoke compositions were developed and tested, and two batches of aerosol checkers weighing 25 kg, creating an aerosol of optimal size to absorb solar radiation, were produced. Calculations of the required dose based on the results of laboratory and field tests of the checkers showed that for one experiment to initiate cloud convection several thousand checkers need to be burned. The consumption of pyrotechnic aerosol composition (tens of tons) is about 1.5 times less than the burning of petroleum products in previously tested meteotrons. However, for environmental safety purposes, full-scale tests and the application of the aerosol layer method is advisable to conduct away from populated areas. Full article
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31 pages, 11065 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Performance of the WRF Model in a Hyper-Arid Environment: A Sensitivity Study
by Rachid Abida, Yacine Addad, Diana Francis, Marouane Temimi, Narendra Nelli, Ricardo Fonseca, Oleksandr Nesterov and Emmanuel Bosc
Atmosphere 2022, 13(6), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13060985 - 18 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1935
Abstract
Accurate simulation of boundary layer surface meteorological parameters is essential to achieve good forecasting of weather and atmospheric dispersion. This paper is devoted to a model sensitivity study over a coastal hyper-arid region in the western desert of the United Arab Emirates. This [...] Read more.
Accurate simulation of boundary layer surface meteorological parameters is essential to achieve good forecasting of weather and atmospheric dispersion. This paper is devoted to a model sensitivity study over a coastal hyper-arid region in the western desert of the United Arab Emirates. This region hosts the Barakah Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP), making it vital to correctly simulate local weather conditions for emergency response in case of an accidental release. We conducted a series of high-resolution WRF model simulations using different combinations of physical schemes for the months January 2019 and June 2019. The simulated results were verified against in-situ meteorological surface measurements available offshore, nearshore, and inland at 12 stations. Several statistical metrics were calculated to rank the performance of the different simulations and a near-to-optimal set of physics options that enhance the performance of a WRF model over different locations in this region has been selected. Additionally, we found that the WRF model performed better in inland locations compared to offshore or nearshore locations, suggesting the important role of dynamical SSTs in mesoscale models. Moreover, morning periods were better simulated than evening ones. The impact of nudging towards station observations resulted in an overall reduction in model errors by 5–15%, which was more marked at offshore and nearshore locations. The sensitivity to grid cell resolution indicated that a spatial resolution of 1 km led to better performance compared to coarser spatial resolutions, highlighting the advantage of high-resolution simulations in which the mesoscale coastal circulation is better resolved. Full article
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