Haze and Related Aerosol Air Pollution in Remote and Urban Areas

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 2 August 2024 | Viewed by 6074

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV 89512, USA
Interests: aerosol; visibility; particulate matter; monitoring; network design; transport

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The editors of Atmosphere are soliciting manuscripts for a Special Issue on haze and related aerosol air pollution in remote and urban areas. Some topics that are appropriate for this Special Issue are provided below (manuscripts on topics that are not specified here will also be considered):

Visibility and aerosol trends in areas with protected visibility status.

Modeling and/or data analysis to apportion haze to sources, including specific sources, source types, and source regions.

Description of monitoring networks for light extinction components (i.e., scattering, absorption, and extinction) and related aerosols and results from such networks.

New techniques for measuring aerosols and their optical effects.

Visibility and aerosol trends in non-protected remote and urban areas.

Theoretical studies of the optical effects of aerosols.

Prof. Dr. Mark C. Green
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • haze
  • atmospheric visibility
  • light extinction
  • apportionment
  • aerosol
  • modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3865 KiB  
Article
Differences in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from α-Pinene Photooxidation in a Chamber with Purified Air and Ambient Air as Matrices: Preliminary Results
by Xinyi Li, Zhuoyue Ren, Xiangyu Zhang, Xiaodie Pang, Wei Song, Yanli Zhang and Xinming Wang
Atmosphere 2024, 15(2), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15020204 - 6 Feb 2024
Viewed by 816
Abstract
α-Pinene is a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that significantly contributes to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere due to its high emission rate, reactivity, and SOA yield. However, the SOA yield measured in chamber studies from α-pinene photooxidation is limited in [...] Read more.
α-Pinene is a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that significantly contributes to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere due to its high emission rate, reactivity, and SOA yield. However, the SOA yield measured in chamber studies from α-pinene photooxidation is limited in a purified air matrix. Assessing SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation in real urban ambient air based on studies conducted in purified air matrices may be subject to uncertainties. In this study, α-pinene photooxidation and SOA yield were investigated in a smog chamber in the presence of NO and SO2 under purified air and ambient air matrices. With the accumulation of ozone (O3) during the photooxidation, an increasing part of α-pinene was consumed by O3 and finally nearly half of the α-pinene was oxidized by O3, facilitating the production of highly oxidized organic molecules and thereby SOA formation. Although the ambient air we introduced as matrix air was largely clean, with initial organic aerosol mass concentrations of ~1.5 μg m−3, the α-pinene SOA yield in the ambient air matrix was 42.3 ± 5.3%, still higher than that of 32.4 ± 0.4% in the purified air matrix. The chemical characterization of SOA by the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) revealed that CxHy accounted for 53.7 ± 1.1% of the total signal in the ambient air matrix experiments, higher than 48.1 ± 0.3% in the purified air, while CxHyO and CxHyO>1 together constituted 45.0 ± 0.9% in the ambient air matrix, lower than 50.1 ± 1.0% in the purified air. The O:C ratio in the ambient air matrix experiments was 0.41 ± 0.01, lower than 0.46 ± 0.01 in the purified air. The higher SOA yield of α-pinene in the ambient air matrix compared to that in the purified air matrix was partly due to the presence of initial aerosols in the ambient air, which facilitated the low volatile organic compounds produced from photochemical oxidation to enter the aerosol phase through gas-particle partitioning. The in-situ aerosol acidity calculated by the ISORROPIA-II model in the ambient air matrix experiments was approximately six times higher than that in purified air, and the higher SOA yield in the ambient air matrix experiments might also be attributed to acid-catalyzed SOA formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haze and Related Aerosol Air Pollution in Remote and Urban Areas)
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18 pages, 2908 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Particulate Matters, Metals, and PAHs’ Air Pollution in Industrial vs. Animal Husbandry Areas
by Luoana-Florentina Pascu, Valeriu Danciulescu, Simona Mariana Calinescu, Vasile Ion Iancu, Ileana Nicolescu, Alina Roxana Banciu, Mihai Nita-Lazar and Gabriela-Geanina Vasile
Atmosphere 2024, 15(1), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15010141 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1013
Abstract
Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) have been noted to generate a high risk for human health. Their presence and concentration have not been equally distributed in the environment and various anthropic activities favored the environmental presence of specific pollution components. The economic sector of [...] Read more.
Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) have been noted to generate a high risk for human health. Their presence and concentration have not been equally distributed in the environment and various anthropic activities favored the environmental presence of specific pollution components. The economic sector of bakery, as well as intensive animal breeding, are well spread worldwide and they represent a priority economic sector due to their direct link to the food industry. In this study, particulate matter (PM) and PAH pollutant compounds were monitored and their presence and concentration were correlated with specific anthropic activities such as bakery and animal husbandry. For the first time, the data analysis established correlations between PM10 or PM2.5 sizes and concentrations with a specific anthropic activity (bakery vs. animal husbandry). PM10 seemed to be more present at sites of animal husbandry activities than bakery ones. The vast majority of high PAH concentrations were detected in industrial sites such as bakeries. Spearman statistical correlation tests of intensive breeding of animals and bakery fields showed a moderate correlation between dimensional fractions of particulate matters, which indicated several emission sources, with different characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haze and Related Aerosol Air Pollution in Remote and Urban Areas)
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20 pages, 10422 KiB  
Article
Distribution and Meteorological Control of PM2.5 and Its Effect on Visibility in Northern Thailand
by Teerachai Amnuaylojaroen, Phonwilai Kaewkanchanawong and Phatcharamon Panpeng
Atmosphere 2023, 14(3), 538; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14030538 - 11 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3290
Abstract
In the dry season, the north of Thailand always experiences reduced air quality, reduced visibility, and public health exposure from the burning of biomass domestically and in surrounding countries. The purpose of this research was to investigate the distribution and the meteorological control [...] Read more.
In the dry season, the north of Thailand always experiences reduced air quality, reduced visibility, and public health exposure from the burning of biomass domestically and in surrounding countries. The purpose of this research was to investigate the distribution and the meteorological control of PM2.5 accumulation, as well as its effect on visibility in northern Thailand in 2020. The Geographic Information System (GIS) was applied for the analysis of the spatial distribution, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was utilized to examine the association between PM2.5 and meteorological variables. The results showed that the PM2.5 concentrations were in the range of 16–195 μg/m3 in 2020. The high level of PM2.5 in Lampang, Chiang Rai, and Chiang Mai provinces was in the range of 150 to 195 μg/m3 from January to May. Favorable meteorological conditions included low wind and relative humidity, and high temperatures contributed to high PM2.5 concentrations in northern Thailand. Domestic burning and burning in neighboring countries contribute to huge amounts of smoke that cause low visibility in northern Thailand, especially at 1 km above ground level, with a reduced visibility in the range of 70–90% for all provinces in April. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haze and Related Aerosol Air Pollution in Remote and Urban Areas)
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